Jim’s Fun At Sea or The Best Fishing Trip Ever!

Jim, our president and supreme ruler, enjoys boating and fishing immensely. We, his faithful minions, enjoy eating the fish he catches even more. We are at absolute awe of his fishing prowess that was proven yet again last Thursday to the unanimous delight of ATI staff. As soon as we heard of his record catch […]
Jim, our president and supreme ruler, enjoys boating and fishing immensely. We, his faithful minions, enjoy eating the fish he catches even more. We are at absolute awe of his fishing prowess that was proven yet again last Thursday to the unanimous delight of ATI staff. As soon as we heard of his record catch in South West Florida the recipes were researched and drooling immediately ensued. Jim aka TeslaJim set off bright and early with Captain Mikey Findictive, his friend Ed McCarthy aka The MarylandCrab and fine group of merry fishermen with creative nicknames as FrontLoaderFrank, Dr. Bill and DoorMat Don. Their epic departure was even capture on Florida television by a mysterious lady in red. Among other prominent fish specimens, Jim’s catch included a 31″ grouper and 30″ amber jack. The cooler of the boat was filling up at record speed! After hours of fun and some hard reeling, these fine gentlemen came into marina elated and victorious. We, back in still cold Maryland cheered! That, and licked our chops… The fish distribution to ATI staff was handled on Monday. I pulled out my best fish taco recipe and we had a glorious family dinner. For those interested the recipe is below.   Grilled Fish Tacos with Chipotle-Lime Dressing
INGREDIENTS:
Marinade
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons distilled white vinegar
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
2 teaspoons lime zest
1 1/2 teaspoons honey
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon cumin
1/2 teaspoon chili powder
1 teaspoon seafood seasoning, such as
Old Bay™
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 teaspoon hot pepper sauce, or to taste
1 pound tilapia fillets, cut into chunks
Dressing
1 (8 ounce) container light sour cream
1/2 cup adobo sauce from chipotle
peppers
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
2 teaspoons lime zest
1/4 teaspoon cumin
1/4 teaspoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon seafood seasoning, such
as Old Bay™
salt and pepper to taste
Toppings
1 (10 ounce) package tortillas
3 ripe tomatoes, seeded and diced
1 bunch cilantro, chopped
1 small head cabbage, cored and
shredded
2 limes, cut in wedges
DIRECTIONS:
1. To make the marinade, whisk together the olive oil, vinegar, lime juice, lime zest, honey, garlic, cumin, chili powder, seafood seasoning, black pepper, and hot sauce in a bowl until blended. Place the tilapia in a shallow dish, and pour the marinade over the fish. Cover, and refrigerate 6 to 8 hours.
2. To make the dressing, combine the sour cream and adobo sauce in a bowl. Stir in the lime juice, lime zest, cumin, chili powder, seafood seasoning. Add salt, and pepper in desired amounts. Cover, and refrigerate until needed.
3. Preheat an outdoor grill for high heat and lightly oil grate. Set grate 4 inches from the heat.
4. Remove fish from marinade, drain off any excess and discard marinade. Grill fish

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USS Normandy Sails On Around-The-World Journey

Applied Technology Institute (ATICourses) offers a variety of courses on Radar, Missiles & Combat Systems.  We thinks the news below will be of interest to our readers. USS Normandy- one of the crown jewels of the Atlantic fleet set off on around-the-world journey out of Norfolk, VA on March 14, 2015.  USS Normandy (CG-60) is a Ticonderoga-class guided-missile […]
Applied Technology Institute (ATICourses) offers a variety of courses on Radar, Missiles & Combat Systems.  We thinks the news below will be of interest to our readers. USS Normandy- one of the crown jewels of the Atlantic fleet set off on around-the-world journey out of Norfolk, VA on March 14, 2015.  USS Normandy (CG-60) is a Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser in the service of the United States Navy. Armed with naval guns and anti-air, anti-surface, and anti-submarine missiles, plus other weapons, she is equipped for surface-to-air, surface-to-surface, and anti-submarine warfare. The cruiser was the first US warship since 1945 to go to war on her maiden cruise and in 1998 she was awarded the title “Most Tomahawks shot by a U.S. Navy Cruiser”. She is named for the World War II Battle of Normandy, France, on and following D-Day. The crew is fairly new and most haven’t been deployed before.  However, they have been put through hundreds of hours of testing and aced UNSURV inspection.  The armament of this ship is truly impressive, including: 2 × 61 cell Mk 41 vertical launch systems containing 8 × RGM-84 Harpoon missiles 2 × Mk 45 Mod 2 5-in/54-callightweight gun 2 × 25 mm Mk 38 gun 2–4 × .50 cal (12.7 mm) gun 2 × Phalanx CIWS Block 1B 2 × Mk 32 12.75-in (324 mm) triple torpedo tubes for lightweight torpedoes The deployment will be hard on the families but we are sure that the crew will fulfill their mission with distinction.  
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Why is March 14, 2015 special to geeks, engineers and scientists? ATI knows. Do you know?

Why is March 14, 2015 special to geeks, engineers and scientists? ATI knows. Do you know? It is PI Day! This holiday celebrates one of the most important numbers in mathematics at 3.14.15 at 9:26:53. The number π is a mathematical constant, the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter, commonly approximated as 3.14159. […]
Why is March 14, 2015 special to geeks, engineers and scientists? ATI knows. Do you know? It is PI Day! This holiday celebrates one of the most important numbers in mathematics at 3.14.15 at 9:26:53. The number π is a mathematical constant, the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter, commonly approximated as 3.14159. It has been represented by the Greek letter “π” since the mid-18th century, though it is also sometimes spelled out as “pi” (/paɪ/). Being an irrational number, π cannot be expressed exactly as a common fraction, although fractions such as 22/7 and other rational numbers are commonly used to approximate π. Consequently its decimal representation never ends and never settles into a permanent repeating pattern. The digits appear to be randomly distributed; however, to date, no proof of this has been discovered. Also, π is a transcendental number – a number that is not the root of any non-zero polynomial having rational coefficients. This transcendence of π implies that it is impossible to solve the ancient challenge of squaring the circle with a compass and straightedge. Because its definition relates to the circle, π is found in many formulae in trigonometry and geometry, especially those concerning circles, ellipses or spheres. It is also found in formulae used in other branches of science such as cosmology, number theory, statistics, fractals, thermodynamics, mechanics and electromagnetism. The ubiquity of π makes it one of the most widely known mathematical constants both inside and outside the scientific community: Several books devoted to it have been published, the number is celebrated on Pi Day and record-setting calculations of the digits of π often result in news headlines. Attempts to memorize the value of π with increasing precision have led to records of over 67,000 digits.


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The Obama administration to sell armed drones to allies

  The United States said Tuesday that it will allow for the first time the export of armed drones to some allied countries. Armed drones are a cornerstone of Washington’s military strategy against armed groups and militants in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Somalia, Syria, Iraq and Yemen. “The United States is the world’s technological leader in the […]
  The United States said Tuesday that it will allow for the first time the export of armed drones to some allied countries. Armed drones are a cornerstone of Washington’s military strategy against armed groups and militants in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Somalia, Syria, Iraq and Yemen. “The United States is the world’s technological leader in the development and deployment of military Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS, or drones),” the State Department said in a statement. “As other nations begin to employ military UAS more regularly and as the nascent commercial UAS market emerges, the United States has a responsibility to ensure that sales, transfers, and subsequent use of all US-origin UAS are responsible and consistent with US national security and foreign policy interests, including economic security, as well as with US values and international standards.” The statement did not say which countries would be customers, but several allies are eager to get their hands on the hardware, with The Washington Post citing Italy, Turkey and the Gulf. So far, the United States has sold its armed drones only to close ally Britain, the newspaper said. “The technology is here to stay,” a senior State Department official told the Post. “It’s to our benefit to have certain allies and partners equipped appropriately.” Drones are hugely controversial with many campainging against their use, pointing to the devastating impact these weapons have on civilians.


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NASA New Horizons spacecraft on the way to rendezvous with planet Pluto

Applied Technology Institute (ATICourses) offers Planetary Science for Aerospace Professionals course.  The news below could be of interest to our readers. The craft has officially begun its six month approach to the planet Pluto. This is the first time a human shuttle will flyby the icy dwarf planet. Pluto, the former planet, currently considered a dwarf […]
Applied Technology Institute (ATICourses) offers Planetary Science for Aerospace Professionals course.  The news below could be of interest to our readers. The craft has officially begun its six month approach to the planet Pluto. This is the first time a human shuttle will flyby the icy dwarf planet. Pluto, the former planet, currently considered a dwarf planet (a plutoid) is still interesting for astronomers, but its distance from the Earth makes it difficult to study and analyze. The main theory is that Pluto’s structure is differentiated, with the rocky material having settled into a dense core surrounded by a mantle of ice; it’s very possible that Pluto actually harbors a liquid ocean of water between the rock and the ice. The New Horizons shuttle is a NASA space probe launched to study the dwarf planet Pluto, its moons and anything else in the vicinity. Following a 3 billion mile trip, New Horizons has awaken from its hibernation and is now ready to start gathering data about Pluto.
“We’ve completed the longest journey any craft has flown from Earth to reach its primary target, and we are ready to begin exploring!” Alan Stern, New Horizons principal investigator from Southwest Research Institute, said in a NASA statement.
Indeed, the name New Horizons is a very fitting name. The mission will reveal information about a class of planets we have no direct observations of, and of which we know very little. “New Horizons is on a journey to a new class of planets we’ve never seen, in a place we’ve never been before. For decades we thought Pluto was this odd little body on the planetary outskirts; now we know it’s really a gateway to an entire region of new worlds in the Kuiper Belt, and New Horizons is going to provide the first close-up look at them”, project leader Hal Weaver said. New Horizons is well equipped for this mission – its scientific instruments include spectrometers (a Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera with a near-infrared imaging spectrometer, an ultraviolet imaging spectrometer and Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation), direct imagers, a dust analyzer and a radio science experiment. These instruments will gather continuous data on the interplanetary environment where the planetary system orbits, We’ll keep you posted with developments and information as New Horizons sends it in.


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Think you can hide in that building? Think again, micro drones will find you!

Applied Technology Institute (ATIcourses) offers the courses below on UAV technology . Unmanned Aircraft Systems-Sensing, Payloads & Products Jan 26-29, 2015 Boston, MA Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Guidance & Control On Site Your Facility Unmanned Air Vehicle Design Feb 17-19, 2015 Columbia, MD Unmanned Aircraft System Fundamentals Feb 24-26, 2015 Columbia, MD We think the news […]
A Black Hornet nano helicopter unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).
Applied Technology Institute (ATIcourses) offers the courses below on UAV technology .
Unmanned Aircraft Systems-Sensing, Payloads & Products Jan 26-29, 2015 Boston, MA
Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Guidance & Control On Site Your Facility
Unmanned Air Vehicle Design Feb 17-19, 2015 Columbia, MD
Unmanned Aircraft System Fundamentals Feb 24-26, 2015 Columbia, MD
We think the news below could be of interest to our readers. The U.S. Army’s Natick Soldier Research Center has come up with a program known as CP-ISR or Cargo Pocket Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance program. Their effort is to develop, build and field a pocket sized drone that can be carried by the individual soldier and that can fly into those buildings and around those walls to see what lurks there to do bodily harm to the soldiers. Currently there are several defense R&D firms working toward this goal but Prox Dynamics’ PD-100 Black Hornet is the one closest to being a fieldable reality: The palm sized Prox Dynamics’ PD-100 Black Hornet only weighs in at 16 grams. With a flight time of nearly a half an hour, it can venture out both vertically and horizontally, into villages and buildings, to provide real time intelligence via streaming video from any of its three cameras. Because of its quiet electronic motors and small size, the little spy drone is almost completely undetectable. We knew it was only a matter of time till this type of tech was a reality on the battle field. We know hobbyists have been dabbling into mini helo’s before but I think the leap from hobby to war fighter is in the miniaturization of quality optics and batteries that last a usable amount of time. We can see eventually these things given lethal abilities, which will make the battle field even that much more scary for anyone coming up against a unit that possesses this tech.


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Are We At The Brink Of Space War? Russian Object 2014-28E could be a satellite-killer.

Applied Technology Institute (ATICourses) offers a variety of courses on Space, Satellite & Aerospace Engineering and Radar, Missiles & Combat Systems.  We think the news on mysterious Object 2014-28E launched by Russian military could be of interest to our readers. A strange vehicle floating above our atmosphere could be Russia’s first piece of space weaponry launched since […]
Space debris populations seen from outside geosynchronous orbit (GEO). Note the two primary debris fields, the ring of objects in GEO, and the cloud of objects in low earth orbit (LEO).
Applied Technology Institute (ATICourses) offers a variety of courses on Space, Satellite & Aerospace Engineering and Radar, Missiles & Combat Systems.  We think the news on mysterious Object 2014-28E launched by Russian military could be of interest to our readers.
A strange vehicle floating above our atmosphere could be Russia’s first piece of space weaponry launched since the end of the Cold War.
Called Object 2014-28E, it has been making unusual movements towards other Russian space vehicles over the past few weeks, and last night it was spotted moving over Guatemala.
It is now being monitored by Norad, the US Military space defence command, since no one can work out for certain what it is.
On the one hand it could be nothing more than a civilian project to help clean up space junk, or a craft for refuelling Russian satellites already in space.
But another, more sinister theory, is that it has been designed to damage satellites belonging to other nations, such as those of the US. In other words, it could be a “satellite killer”.
Patricia Lewis, research director at think-tank Chatham House, told the FT: “It could have a number of functions, some civilian and some military. One possibility is for some kind of grabber bar.
“Another would be kinetic pellets which shoot out at another satellite. Or possibly there could be a satellite-to-satellite cyber attack or jamming.
She added that as long as countries are adopting military methods of attack on the ground, there is no reason why this shouldn’t extend to space. “It would be odd if space were to remain the one area that [militaries] don’t get their hands on,” she said.
It was only last week, after all, that hackers linked to the Chinese government infiltrated US federal weather satellites.
The fact that Russia has not declared the launch of this mysterious object has exacerbated fears of a revival of the Kremlin’s former project to destroy satellites. During the Cold War, Stalin introduced a project called Istrebitel Sputnikov for just this purpose, and sent military vehicles into space to damage US satellites.
The project came to an end in 1989 when the iron curtain fell – a time when many of the clandestine research projects Soviet and US engineers were working on were closed down.
But Russian military officials publicly stated that they would restart research if their relations with the US over anti-missile defence treaties deteriorated.
Given the many sanctions the West is currently placing on Russia due to its involvement in the Ukraine crisis, it seems like the time is ripe for Moscow to take up its space weapons once more.

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Family affair in hunt for MH370

A 20-year-old “genius” electronic engineer and his father are among the crew searching for the missing Malaysian flight MH370.   Applied Technology Institute (ATIcourses) offers a variety of courses on Acoustic, Noise & Sonar Engineering.  The news below will be of interest to our readers. When Jay Larsen, the chief engineer on MH370 search vessel GO Phoenix, […]
A 20-year-old “genius” electronic engineer and his father are among the crew searching for the missing Malaysian flight MH370.   Applied Technology Institute (ATIcourses) offers a variety of courses on Acoustic, Noise & Sonar Engineering.  The news below will be of interest to our readers. When Jay Larsen, the chief engineer on MH370 search vessel GO Phoenix, needed a new technician, his 20-year-old son Kolter sprang to mind. “He’s an electrical engineer genius and we asked him to come along,” he said. “He’s been a very solid member. I’m proud of him. “I don’t know that we can understand the weight of what we’re doing honestly. “We’ve all experienced losses close to us and we’re out here trying our hardest.” Jay and Kolter are key members of a search crew on board the GO Phoenix, a vessel scouring the Indian Ocean for the missing Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 (MH370), which disappeared March 8 while ferrying 239 passengers and crewmembers from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to Beijing, China.
And while the Flathead Valley natives long to be home tracking elk sign through the wet November snow, the significance of their contribution to the search expedition isn’t lost on either of them. For seven months, family members of the missing passengers and flight crew have been waiting for answers buried in a watery abyss, and Larsen hopes his highly specialized sonar technology can help bring them to light. Jay Larsen owns the Whitefish-based deep-sea survey company Hydrospheric Solutions LLC (HSI), and, as chief engineer of the sonar kit that the ship is towing miles beneath the ocean surface, he has spent the last month mapping the undulating mountains and crevasses of the ocean floor, working round-the-clock to locate the missing flight in the remote southern Indian Ocean. His son, Kolter, an engineering student at Montana State University – Jay’s alma mater – joined the crew somewhat serendipitously as an electrical technician while taking a semester off college. The sonar that HSI is towing 3.2 miles beneath the ship is called the SLH ProSAS-60, owned by SL Hydrospheric LLC, a company that Larsen still co-manages and co-founded in 2008 with the purpose of bringing the rarefied device to the deep-sea surveying market. Read more here.


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NAVY’s Stealth Ship of the future: Zumwalt

Applied Technology Institute (ATI Courses) offers a variety of courses on Radar, Missiles & Combat Systems and  Acoustic, Noise & Sonar Engineering. The news about new NAVY’s stealth destroyer would be of great interest to our readers. The US Navy’s newest and biggest toy is the imposing Zumwalt-class guided-missile destroyer, a svelte, stealthy entry designed to […]
Applied Technology Institute (ATI Courses) offers a variety of courses on Radar, Missiles & Combat Systems and  Acoustic, Noise & Sonar Engineering. The news about new NAVY’s stealth destroyer would be of great interest to our readers. The US Navy’s newest and biggest toy is the imposing Zumwalt-class guided-missile destroyer, a svelte, stealthy entry designed to complement the Navy’s large fleet of Arleigh Burke-class DDGs. Considering everything from its stealthy figure – which allows it to appear on radar as the same size as a fishing boat – to its 155-millimeter (six-inch) Advanced Gun System represents a significant leap forward in naval technology, it’d be impossible for us to recap all the significant features on this new ship. Thankfully, Defense News has a really thorough and feature-laden story on the lead ship of the class, theUSS Zumwalt. Covering the ship from bow to stern, anything you might want to know (and that’s been released to the public) about this new destroyer can be found there. Head over and have a look!


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Space Taxis by 2017-Compliments of Boeing & SpaceX

Applied Technology Institute (ATICorses) offers a variety of courses on Space, Satellite & Aerospace Engineering. We think the news below would be of interest to our readers. NASA has selected Boeing and SpaceX to resume U.S. human spaceflight. The two companies are newly contracted to become NASA’s space taxis, flying American astronauts to and from the […]
Applied Technology Institute (ATICorses) offers a variety of courses on Space, Satellite & Aerospace Engineering. We think the news below would be of interest to our readers. NASA has selected Boeing and SpaceX to resume U.S. human spaceflight. The two companies are newly contracted to become NASA’s space taxis, flying American astronauts to and from the International Space Station, and eventually ending the county’s reliance on Russia for transport. Since the shuttle program was retired [in 2011], NASA crew members have been hitching rides on Russian Soyuz spacecraft, at a cost of $70 million per seat.  The agency typically purchases six seats per year. NASA’s partnership with the companies is part of the Commercial Crew Program. The program is intended to help private companies develop spacecraft to carry astronauts into low Earth orbit by 2017. Once built, the seven passenger shuttle capsules will be owned by the private companies, not NASA. Both companies will design crafts and undergo safety testing before manned flights are booked. Once certified, each company will launched an estimated two to six missions. Boeing is set to build three of its CST-100 — seven passenger — crafts at Florida’s Kennedy Space Center. Space X will build its first passenger craft, since its existing SpaceX Dragon delivers only cargo to the space station currently. Space X Dragon became the first commercial spacecraft for cargo in 2012. The contracts with NASA are worth $6.8 billion. Boeing has the larger share with $4.2 billion, and Space X receives $2.6 billion.


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The Invisible Machine: Electromagnetic Warfare

Applied Technology Institute (ATI Courses) offers the courses below on EMI/EMC technology. Design for Electomagentic Compatibility & Signal Integrity Feb 10-11, 2015 San Diego, CA Design for Electomagentic Compatibility & Signal Integrity Feb 17-18, 2015 Orlando, FL EMI/EMC in Military Systems Sep 23-25, 2014 Columbia, MD EMI/EMC in Military Systems Nov 18-20, 2014 Newport, RI […]
A right front view of a USAF Boeing E-4 advanced airborne command post (AABNCP) on the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) simulator (HAGII-C) for testing.
Applied Technology Institute (ATI Courses)
offers the courses below on EMI/EMC technology.
Design for Electomagentic Compatibility & Signal Integrity Feb 10-11, 2015 San Diego, CA
Design for Electomagentic Compatibility & Signal Integrity Feb 17-18, 2015 Orlando, FL
EMI/EMC in Military Systems Sep 23-25, 2014 Columbia, MD
EMI/EMC in Military Systems Nov 18-20, 2014 Newport, RI
We thought the news below could be of interest to our readers. Imagine the future – a strange new weapon is detonated high over a large city. There is no explosion, no visible destruction, but everything electronic within the range of this weapon will go out…permanently. Every electronic gadget in every home and office – disabled. No computers, no T.V., no life support systems in hospitals, no water supply, no heat, no lights – truly, a return to the dark ages. Imagine a full range of new weapons; one can take out the electricity in your city, another can destroy you. If you haven’t heard about these weapons, it’s no surprise. Their development has been secretive and they sound more like science fiction than reality. When did this reality really begin and how far advanced is it now? The fact is  Electromagnetic Warfare Is Here.
Read more here.


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hitchBot: Not The Hitchhiker Your Mother Warned You About!

“My name is hitchBot.” Your mother might have warned you about picking up hitchhikers, but clearly she never met hitchBOT. The brainchild of Ryerson’s Frauke Zeller and McMaster’s David Smith, hitchBOT was raised by a family of researchers, and described itself as “a free-spirited robot who wanted to explore Canada and meet new friends along […]
“My name is hitchBot.” Your mother might have warned you about picking up hitchhikers, but clearly she never met hitchBOT. The brainchild of Ryerson’s Frauke Zeller and McMaster’s David Smith, hitchBOT was raised by a family of researchers, and described itself as “a free-spirited robot who wanted to explore Canada and meet new friends along the way.” HitchBot has a bucket body, pool noodles for arms and legs, wears rubber boots and has rubber gloves for hands, complete with the ever important hitching thumb. HitchBOT was created by a team of Ontario-based communications researchers studying the relationship between people and technology. It’s not every day you see a robot at the side of the road, and hitchBOT quickly became a media darling. Pretty soon, hitchBOT was fielding interview requests and rubbing shoulders with celebrities. Somebody would be curious, stop and pick her up. She would say, ‘Hi, I’m hitchBot, I’m going to Victoria. Would you like to give me a ride?’ Usually they would say, ‘Sure.’ She would hop in, plug into the cigarette lighter and they drive along. The driver would drop her on the highway because they had to turn off and they would just leave her on the highway. Just like some human hitchhikers, hitchBot was good road company. She would ask what you think about the creation of the universe or if you believe in God. She was able to talk about that she was going to Victoria. She explained who her creators are by name. So she’s very intelligent. Over the course of its cross-country adventure hitchBOT chilled with the Kelowna-based band The Wild!, met the groundhog known as Wiarton Willie, and crashed a wedding, where it adorably interrupted the bride and groom’s toasts to proclaim, “I like to make friends.” That level of cute should really be illegal, but hitchBOT pulled it off in style. After travelling more than 6,000 kilometres from coast to coast, hitchBOT arrived in Victoria, B.C. on Saturday. Throughout the three-week journey, a popular Twitter account, @hitchBOT, kept followers informed of the robot’s progress and adventures. The account currently has more than 34,000 followers. Robotics are definitely becoming increasingly larger part of our lives. Scientists from Japan and France, working together, announced last month that they had developed an algorithm that can recognize emotions from a human gait. What is your opinion on this? Please comment below…
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A Malaysian naval vessel is heading to the Indian Ocean to join the search for MH370.

A Malaysian navy vessel fitted with specialised sonar equipment has set sail for the Indian Ocean to join in the search for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 that went missing nearly five months ago. Defence Minister Hishammuddin Hussein said the KD Mutiara vessel left a navy base on Monday in the north-eastern state of Perak. The […]
A Malaysian navy vessel fitted with specialised sonar equipment has set sail for the Indian Ocean to join in the search for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 that went missing nearly five months ago. Defence Minister Hishammuddin Hussein said the KD Mutiara vessel left a navy base on Monday in the north-eastern state of Perak. The vessel has sonar equipment that can detect objects down to 7,000 meters from the sea surface, he said. A Chinese ship and an Australian-contracted private vessel are conducting a survey of the Indian Ocean floor where the aircraft was believed to have crashed off the coast of Western Australia. It vanished without a trace on March 8 about an hour after takeoff from Kuala Lumpur. Malaysia has vowed to continue the search for the missing flight until the aircraft is found. The plane was carrying 239 people aboard the flight to Beijing when it radically changed course and the tracking instruments were shut off. Aviation specialists have surmised that it flew south over the ocean, and would have run out of fuel.


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UNMANNED EXPERTS TEAMS WITH TRANSPORT RISK MANAGEMENT TO TRAIN & INSURE SAFE SUAS OPERATORS

  Applied Technology Institute (ATI Courses) offers a variety of courses on Unmanned Aircraft Vehicles & Systems.  The dates of the open enrollment courses are below. Unmanned Air Vehicle Design Nov 11-13, 2014 Columbia, MD Unmanned Air Vehicle Design Feb 17-19, 2015 Columbia, MD Unmanned Aircraft System Fundamentals Feb 24-26, 2015 Columbia, MD We also […]
  Applied Technology Institute (ATI Courses) offers a variety of courses on Unmanned Aircraft Vehicles & Systems.  The dates of the open enrollment courses are below.
Unmanned Air Vehicle Design Nov 11-13, 2014 Columbia, MD
Unmanned Air Vehicle Design Feb 17-19, 2015 Columbia, MD
Unmanned Aircraft System Fundamentals Feb 24-26, 2015 Columbia, MD
We also offer Unmanned Aircraft Systems-Sensing, Payloads & Products and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Guidance & Control as on-site courses. The news below would be of interest to our visitors.
Accidents happen, BUT the inset photo shows what happens when an uninsured and untrained civil UAS pilot in Australia drops an octo-copter on someone’s head, and nothing about this incident was pretty! To try to prevent this happening elsewhere Transport Risk Management (http://www.transportrisk.com/uavrcfilm.html), a world-leader in aviation insurance provision, has teamed with Unmanned Experts LLC to provide ‘Initial Qualification Training’ (IQT) to Small UAS operators. The initial courseware is online in an e-learning format and includes the following:   The 8 Module IQT Short Course (http://www.unmannedexperts.com/initial-qualification-training-iqt1/) has been built from ‘best practices’ in both manned, radio-controlled and UAS/RPAS international communities and is designed to provide essential aeronautical information for serious amateurs and professionals operating Small UAS in National Airspaces. Topics include all applicable regulations and guidance documents; aeronautical background information such as charts, NOTAMS and Aircraft Circulars; Radio Communications Procedures; Human Factors and Crew Resource Management; Basic Small UAS Aerodynamics; Weather factors; Airmanship and Decision-making and Safe Operating Procedures. No prior knowledge is required for entry onto the course, which is accessed from the UMEX Learning Management System (https://unmannedexperts.talentlms.com/catalog). Contact TRM to discuss a substantial discount (currently a further 50% off sale price)!   Individual Course Lectures include:  
 
SR1.    Small UAS Regulations & Guidance F5.       Basic Aeronautical Data SF1.    Small UAS Aerodynamics F6.       Radio Communications Procedures SW1.   Small UAS Weather O1.      Human Factors & CRM SO1.    Small UAS Operational Art SO2.    Small UAS Safe Operations SQ1.    IQT Qualifying Quiz
    Successful completion of the course leads to a Certificate which is qualification for liability and hull flight insurance coverage with Transport Risk Management as well as for professional credits with George Mason University (http://ocpe.gmu.edu/student/ceus.htm)   UMEX runs a number of Small UAS flying instruction courses as well, which also qualify for TRM coverage, and come highly recommended for those wishing to improve their flight skills as well as their professional knowledge. More information here http://www.unmannedexperts.com/suas-sf-ap-cse/   Hope to meet on a SUAS shoot somewhere soon!
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U.S. Brings First-of-Its Kind Cyber-Espionage Charges Against Chinese Military Officials

Applied Technology Institute (ATIcourses) offers Cyber Warfare – Global Trends course taught by Albert Kinney  who has 20 years of experience in research and operational cyberspace mission areas including the initial development and first operational employment of the Naval Cyber Attack Team.  We thought the news below would be of interest to our readers. The United […]

Applied Technology Institute (ATIcourses) offers Cyber Warfare – Global Trends course taught by Albert Kinney  who has 20 years of experience in research and operational cyberspace mission areas including the initial development and first operational employment of the Naval Cyber Attack Team.  We thought the news below would be of interest to our readers. The United States has brought first-of-its kind cyber-espionage charges against five Chinese military officials accused of hacking into U.S. companies to gain trade secrets. The indictment accuses the hackers of targeting the U.S. nuclear power, metals and solar products industries. The alleged victims are brand-name companies including Alcoa and Westinghouse. he indictment includes allegations of trade secret theft and economic espionage. Attorney General Eric Holder and other federal law enforcement officials were announcing the indictments later Monday. Holder says in a statement that the U.S. will not tolerate foreign government efforts to sabotage American companies. THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP’s earlier story is below. The United States is preparing to announce first-of-its-kind criminal charges Monday against Chinese military officials in an international cyberspying case, a government official said. Attorney General Eric Holder and other federal law enforcement officials were expected to reveal the new indictments later Monday, the official told The Associated Press. The indictments will accuse individuals of participating in cyber-espionage on behalf of a foreign government, said the official, who revealed this information only on grounds of anonymity because this person wasn’t authorized to publicly discuss the case in advance of the official announcement. The official described the prosecution as unprecedented. The official said Chinese government officials are being charged in the United States with hacking into private-sector companies to gain trade secrets, adding that Holder and other top-level law enforcement officials were poised to announce charges that include economic espionage and trade-secret theft. Read more here.


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Black Knight Transformer — A Military Octorotor You Can Ride In

Applied Technology Institute (ATICourses) offers multiple courses on unmanned aerial vehicle technology. Unmanned Aircraft Systems- Sensing, Payloads & Products Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Guidance & Control Unmanned Air Vehicle Design Unmanned Aircraft System Fundamentals We saw this pop up a few times before and to be honest, we weren’t sure if it was actually real or […]
Applied Technology Institute (ATICourses) offers multiple courses on unmanned aerial vehicle technology.
Unmanned Aircraft Systems- Sensing, Payloads & Products
Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Guidance & Control
Unmanned Air Vehicle Design
Unmanned Aircraft System Fundamentals
We saw this pop up a few times before and to be honest, we weren’t sure if it was actually real or not. This is the Advanced Tactics Black Knight Transformer — the world’s first VTOL (vertical take off and landing) aircraft that also doubles as an off-road vehicle. Designed and built in California, it just received government approval and Advanced Tactics has released the first driving and flight test video. It was apparently designed as a rapid-response evacuation vehicle for wounded soldiers in war affected zones. It features a whopping eight individually driven rotors that swing out on “transforming” arms during flight. It also has a removable ground drive-train which can be swapped out for an amphibious boat hull, or even a cargo pod! At the forefront of large-scale multicopter design and manufacturing, we looked around Advanced Tactic’s website a bit and found another one of their projects, the Transformer Panthers UAS — a miniature version of the Black Knight, designed as a small unmanned aircraft system that is also capable of land and sea use. Let us know what you think!

 


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U.S. deep-sea sub “Nereus” lost in Kermadec Trench

A deep-sea research sub has been lost in Kermadec Trench, one of the ocean’s deepest spots, which lies northeast of New Zealand, media reports said Tuesday. The unmanned robotic vessel, called Nereus, went missing on Saturday while exploring the Kermadec Trench. It was a flagship ocean explorer for the U.S. science community. Surface debris was […]
A deep-sea research sub has been lost in Kermadec Trench, one of the ocean’s deepest spots, which lies northeast of New Zealand, media reports said Tuesday. The unmanned robotic vessel, called Nereus, went missing on Saturday while exploring the Kermadec Trench. It was a flagship ocean explorer for the U.S. science community. Surface debris was found, suggesting the 8 million dollar sub suffered a catastrophic implosion as a result of the immense pressures when it was operating some 10km down. The deep trench has pressures of about 16,000 pounds per square inch(psi). “Nereus helped us explore places we have never seen before and ask questions we never thought to ask,” said biologist Timothy Shank from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, which managed the sub. The robot was built in 2008 and could operate in an autonomous mode or remotely controlled via a tether to a support ship to explore the Earth’s deepest oceanic trenches. The team is now collecting surface debris in hopes of revealing more about the implosion. Read more here
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Heartbleed Used by Identity Thieves in Phishing Scam

As many security experts predicated, scammers are exploiting the news of the Heartbleed Internet-security bug, sending unsuspecting citizens email messages asking them to log into sensitive accounts. Researchers at security giant Symantec noticed one such message, which purported to come from a well-known insurance company that caters to U.S. military veterans and their families. The message is […]
As many security experts predicated, scammers are exploiting the news of the Heartbleed Internet-security bug, sending unsuspecting citizens email messages asking them to log into sensitive accounts. Researchers at security giant Symantec noticed one such message, which purported to come from a well-known insurance company that caters to U.S. military veterans and their families. The message is part of a phishing scam trying to steal website login credentials in order to gain access to sensitive personal information. MORE: Heartbleed Bug: Information, Advice and Resources “We wanted to make you aware of ‘Heartbleed’ Internet bug affecting many servers,” reads the Heartbleed phishing message in official-sounding but somewhat stilted English. “A security patch was implemented for [the company website] earlier this week, and although we have no indication that our security certificates have been compromised, we have obtained new certificates for [the website].” So far, so good. Heartbleed did indeed affect millions of Web and email servers, and in order to properly patch them, administrators would have to reissue security certificates that may have been compromised. But then the email goes off the rails.
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Will passenger remains from missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 ever be found?

As the search for the missing Malaysia jet continues, the likelihood that remains of the plane’s 239 passengers will be found dwindles, according to aviation experts. David Learmont, operations and safety editor at Flight International magazine, told NBC News while it’s not out of the realm of possibility, each passing day makes it more unlikely that […]
Navy personnel on board a P-8I aircraft during a search operation for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 aircraft in the southern Indian Ocean.
As the search for the missing Malaysia jet continues, the likelihood that remains of the plane’s 239 passengers will be found dwindles, according to aviation experts. David Learmont, operations and safety editor at Flight International magazine, told NBC News while it’s not out of the realm of possibility, each passing day makes it more unlikely that remains or even personal effects from those on Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 will be found. The plane disappeared March 8 and, despite several promising leads, no wreckage or debris has been found. Among the problems, Learmont said, is the vast search area and the unknowns related to where the plane went down, things that are different than the 2009 crash of Air France 447. In that crash, searchers were able to find remains two years after the plane went down in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Brazil. “MH370 is a different ball game,” Learmont said. “We know nothing.” A robotic submarine searching for the wreckage completed its first full 16-hour mission Wednesday after two previous aborted missions. The Bluefin-21 autonomous underwater vehicle has searched about 35 square miles in its three trips. So far, the data shows no sign of the plane, officials said, adding it could take up to two months for the submarine to scour the 250-plus mile search area. DNA could be used to identify remains   The ocean floor where the jetliner is believed to have gone down is silty, Learmont said, making recovery even more difficult but keeping some animals away from the area. “Anything heavy — engine parts, wing spars — may sink in, in which case … we may not be able to ‘see’ anything,” Learmont said. If even fragments of remains are ever found, experts will be able to use DNA and forensics to determine whom they belong to. First, however, an unmanned vehicle would have to haul the wreckage and any remains to the surface.


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Malaysia Airlines Flight 370: The result of Bluefin-21’s first foray? Nothing of interest.

Time to try this again. The first deployment of an underwater vehicle to hunt for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 was aborted early, sending the drone back to the surface 10 hours before expected. Search officials analyzed data from the Bluefin-21’s six hours underwater, and found no objects of interest, the U.S. Navy said Tuesday. Read […]

Time to try this again. The first deployment of an underwater vehicle to hunt for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 was aborted early, sending the drone back to the surface 10 hours before expected. Search officials analyzed data from the Bluefin-21’s six hours underwater, and found no objects of interest, the U.S. Navy said Tuesday. Read more here.


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Malaysia Air Flight 370: Two More Pings Received Yesterday

ATIcourses offers a variety of courses on technology currently employed in search for Malaysia Air Flight 370. The search teams looking for the wreckage of Malaysia Air Flight 370 believe they have heard a total of four pings from the “black boxes” in the last few days — two of which were received yesterday. The signals […]
ATIcourses offers a variety of courses on technology currently employed in search for Malaysia Air Flight 370. The search teams looking for the wreckage of Malaysia Air Flight 370 believe they have heard a total of four pings from the “black boxes” in the last few days — two of which were received yesterday. The signals came from the narrowing search area off of Australia’s northwest coast, on frequencies consistent with those of commercial-aircraft flight recorders. After more than a month, though, time is running out on locating them through their beacon transmissions. Read more here.


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Robert Bell’s View on Satellite Technology

Applied Technology Institute (ATI Courses) offers plenty of courses on satellite technology.  We thought the view expressed by Executive Director of SSPI and WTA; Senior Consultant, Alan/Anthony, Inc., Robert Bell would be of interest to our readers. The satellite business is a technology business with enormous impact on business, government and human welfare. So what do […]
Applied Technology Institute (ATI Courses) offers plenty of courses on satellite technology.  We thought the view expressed by Executive Director of SSPI and WTA; Senior Consultant, Alan/Anthony, Inc., Robert Bell would be of interest to our readers.
The satellite business is a technology business with enormous impact on business, government and human welfare. So what do all of us inside the industry spend all our time talking about? Bit rates and look angles. Ephemeris data and electric propulsion. How HTS will affect FSS and the enticing attractions of DVB-S2 extensions. It’s enough to make ad man Don Draper start crying into his Canadian Club. Over the past few years, the industry has woken up to the risk that we will get our clocks cleaned by a terrestrial wireless industry that is hungry for spectrum. Waking is up is good, and SSPI is putting its shoulder to the wheel with other industry associations in the run-up to the World Radiocommunications Conference of 2015. But it is worth taking a moment to think about why our clocks are available for cleaning. If you were looking for an example of a technology business with enormous impact on the world, the mobile industry would be top of the list. Take just the example of Safaricom in Kenya. Safaricom created a money transfer service called M-PESA, which lets users load money onto their cell phones just as they would load prepaid air time. The service made Safaricom a lot of money last year. It also let Kenyans make US$19.6 billion in payments and money transfers– a total that exceeded Kenya’s national budget. With 70 percent of adult Kenyans – and 50% of the poor – using it, The Economist estimates that M-Pesa has boosted national GDP by as much as 25 percent. So popular has the service been that it drove an overall increase in mobile penetration from 49% in 2008 to 77% in 2012 – and greater phone penetration alone has generated $2.4 trillion in economic growth, according to a report by Deloitte (Mobile Telephone and Taxation in Kenya 2011). That’s an appealing story, right? But our industry accomplishes miracles like this on a regular basis. It’s just that we prefer to keep it a secret from the world because…because – well, raise your hand if you can think of a reason. At SSPI, we are determined to start telling secrets. We are inviting our members, sponsors, academic researchers and other industry trade groups to submit case studies of satellite changing the world. We want to create a set of powerful, emotive stories that dramatically illustrate how much our planet relies on the faint radio signals that travel between earth and space, from supporting free elections to improving education, providing news and entertainment to raising crop yields, saving lives to maintaining security in a dangerous world. We will publish those stories for the use of our partner associations, from ESOA and GVF to SIA, whose job it is to lobby for our industry. While they present the rational case for protecting C-Band, we will make the human case: why business, government, health, safety and welfare rely on interference-free access to space. In the end, spectrum decisions are political decisions, and powerful stories can have a major impact.
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Saved By NASA: Nightmarish Sinkholes Can Be Predicted By Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar

ATIcourses offers Synthetic Aperture Radar – Fundamentals May 5-6, 2014 Denver, CO Synthetic Aperture Radar – Advanced May 7-8, 2014 Denver, CO We thought the news below could be of interest to our readers. The idea of the ground opening without warning and swallowing you up is nightmare fuel. As populations grow and humans invent […]
ATIcourses offers
Synthetic Aperture Radar – Fundamentals May 5-6, 2014 Denver, CO
Synthetic Aperture Radar – Advanced May 7-8, 2014 Denver, CO
We thought the news below could be of interest to our readers. The idea of the ground opening without warning and swallowing you up is nightmare fuel. As populations grow and humans invent new ways to plunder underground resources, sinkholes are only becoming more common—just look at the US sinkhole capital, Florida. But America’s space agency, NASA, said it may have developed a way to predict sinkholes up to a month before the ground collapses, saving lives and money. The early warning is provided by interferometric synthetic aperture radar (iSAR), which could be mounted on planes or satellites to scan sinkhole prone areas. iSAR scans the ground multiple times in multiple wavelengths to put together interferograms, which can show tiny movements of the earth, including the ripples of earthquakes, the effects of flooding on riverbanks, or where the ground is sinking.This interferogram shows the ground sinking near oil wells in California: Researchers at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory have been monitoring changing ground conditions along the US Gulf Coast as part of research into iSAR. When a nasty sinkhole formed at Bayou Corne, Louisiana, in 2012, researchers went back and examined radar scans in the same area a month and a year before the cave-in. They found that the ground surface layer had moved as much as 10 inches (26 cm) toward the sinkhole’s center.  The sinkhole was caused by a company owned by Occidental Petroleum mining too closely to a geological feature called a salt dome. The researchers say this data, published in last month’s issue of the scientific journal Geology, shows that once the technology is more widely used and deployed on satellite platforms, not just airplanes, it can be used to tell when the earth is about to transform into a gaping maw. The US and India are collaborating to launch an iSAR-equipped satellite sometime in the next seven years.
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UKRAINE CRISIS: There is At Least One Place the U.S. and Russia Are Still Getting Along. It’s Not on Earth

International Space Station (ISS)  is jointly operated by the U.S., Russia, Europe, Canada and Japan. Currently, there are three Russians, two Americans, and one Japanese astronaut on board the station currently orbiting earth. Roughly 250 miles below, however, the relationship between the two superpowers is a good deal different, with Vladimir Putin refusing to rule […]
Expedition 38 crew members proudly sport their national flags in this March 2014 picture from the International Space Station. Pictured (clockwise from top center) are Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, commander; Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Koichi Wakata, Russian cosmonaut Sergey Ryazanskiy, NASA astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Mike Hopkins, and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Tyurin, all flight engineers. Credit: NASA Read more: http://www.universetoday.com/110010/budget-2015-ukraine-crisis-not-disrupting-russian-soyuz-flights-nasa-admin-says/#ixzz2vCxFYTDY
International Space Station (ISS)  is jointly operated by the U.S., Russia, Europe, Canada and Japan. Currently, there are three Russians, two Americans, and one Japanese astronaut on board the station currently orbiting earth. Roughly 250 miles below, however, the relationship between the two superpowers is a good deal different, with Vladimir Putin refusing to rule out using military force in Ukraine and the Obama administration accusing the Russians of creating a “pretext to invade.” The ever-increasing tension between the United States and Russia does not, according to NASA, extend to outer space, via the Washington Post:
“Everything is nominal right now with our relationship with the Russians,” said NASA administrator Charles Bolden during a teleconference Tuesday. With the space shuttle retired, the U.S. relies on Russia’s Soyuz spacecraft to get to and from the space station. Russia charges about $71 million per seat. There is no other way for American astronauts to get back to Earth.
Tuesday’s teleconference was set up to allow Bolden to discuss the White House’s Fiscal Year 2015 budget request, but he wound up fielding numerous inquiries from reporters about whether the Ukraine crisis has affected NASA’s strategic planning. No, Bolden said repeatedly. He noted that past flare-ups between the U.S. and Russia have not affected operations in space. “We have weathered the storm through lots of contingencies here,” Bolden said.


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25 years on we overwhelmingly embrace World Wide Web

I don’t take the Web for granted. In my 34 years, we’ve gone from just having TV and land lines to handheld devices that basically make the collected knowledge of the world available any time, any place. The Web allows people to communicate and mobilize around ideas. It informs and amuses us. You wouldn’t be […]
I don’t take the Web for granted. In my 34 years, we’ve gone from just having TV and land lines to handheld devices that basically make the collected knowledge of the world available any time, any place. The Web allows people to communicate and mobilize around ideas. It informs and amuses us. You wouldn’t be reading this without it. Here are some interesting facts that could be of interest to our readers. In March 1989, Tim Berners-Lee proposed a system that would allow the Internet to be used by regular people. He called it the World Wide Web. Though the Web and the Internet often are used interchangeably, the Internet was already in existence as a collection of computer networks used almost exclusively by government and university scientists.
What Berners-Lee created was called “distributed hypertext,” and it provided a means for computers to access files and images stored on other computers. In other words, Berners-Lee made lolcats possible.
The Pew Internet Project has marked this anniversary with a fascinating look at the World Wide Web and how it’s affected our lives.
  • 87 percent of American adults use the Web; 71 percent use it every day
  • More than half regularly go online using a cell phone
  • 90 percent of Web users say it’s had a positive impact on their lives
  • 53 percent of Web users say it would be “very hard” to give up. That compares to 35 percent who say television would be very hard to give up
I’m firmly in the 90 percent that believes the Web has made their lives better.
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