ATI’s GPS Technology – Solutions for Earth & Space Course is to be presented in Laurel, MD on March 14-17, 2011

ATI is scheduled to present GPS Technology – Solutions for Earth & Space Course is to be presented in Laurel, MD on March 14-17, 2011.  This course will be taught by legendary instructor, Mr. Tom Logsdon, who taught short courses and lectured in 31 different countries. He has written and published 40 technical papers and […]
ATI is scheduled to present GPS Technology – Solutions for Earth & Space Course is to be presented in Laurel, MD on March 14-17, 2011.  This course will be taught by legendary instructor, Mr. Tom Logsdon, who taught short courses and lectured in 31 different countries. He has written and published 40 technical papers and journal articles, a dozen of which have dealt with military and civilian radionavigation techniques. He is also the author of 29 technical books on various engineering and scientific subjects.

In this popular four-day short course, GPS expert Tom Logsdon will describe in detail how those precise radionavigation systems work and review the many practical benefits they provide to military and civilian users in space and around the globe.

Each student will receive a new personal GPS Navigator with a multi-channel capability.

Through practical demonstration you will learn how the receiver works, how to operate it in various situations, and how to interpret the positioning solutions it provides.

View course sampler

Why Not a Short Technical Course for Your New Years Resolution?

ATI Short Courses Rock! Video Clip: Click to Watch Why Not Make Yourself a New Year’s Resolution which is Easy to Keep? Making New Year’s resolutions is easy. Keeping New Year’s resolutions is hard. It doesn’t have to be hard. While we can’t help you take those holiday pounds off, or reduce your holi-“daze” bills, we […]
ATI Short Courses Rock!
ATI Short Courses Rock!
Video Clip: Click to Watch
Why Not Make Yourself a New Year’s Resolution which is Easy to Keep?
Making New Year’s resolutions is easy. Keeping New Year’s resolutions is hard. It doesn’t have to be hard. While we can’t help you take those holiday pounds off, or reduce your holi-“daze” bills, we can help improve your career by keeping your professional knowledge up-to-date. Our short courses provide a clear understanding of fundamental principles and give you a better working knowledge of current technology and applications. Since 1984, Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has provided leading-edge public courses and onsite technical training to DoD and NASA personnel, as well as contractors. ATI is the leading technical training organization specializing in short courses in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. Any ATI course can be customized and presented On Site at your location. To make it easy to keep this New Year’s resolution, you can contact ATI in any one of five easy ways: • Call toll free at 1-888-501-2100 • Visit us on the web at aticourses.com • Send an email to ati@ATIcourses.com • See the exclusive ATI channel on YouTube at ATI on YouTube • Fax us your completed registration at 410-956-5785 ATI short courses are designed to help you keep your professional knowledge up-to-date. Our courses provide a practical overview of space and defense technologies which provide a strong foundation for understanding the issues that must be confronted in the use, regulation and development such complex systems. Our short courses are designed for individuals involved in planning, designing, building, launching, and operating space and defense systems. Whether you are a busy engineer, a technical expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of complex systems in a short time. You will become aware of the basic vocabulary essential to interact meaningfully with your colleagues. Course Outline, Samplers, and Notes Determine for yourself the value of our courses before you sign up. See our samples (See Slide Samples) on some of our courses. Or check out the new ATI channel on YouTube. After attending the course you will receive a full set of detailed notes from the class for future reference, as well as a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information. About ATI and Our Instructors Our mission here at the ATI is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses. ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology. Times, Dates and Locations For the times, dates and locations of all of our technical short courses, please access the links below. Sincerely, The ATI Courses Team P.S Call today for registration at 410-956-8805 or 888-501-2100 or access our website at www.ATIcourses.com. For general questions please email us at ATI@ATIcourses.com.
Mark N. Lewellen
Consultant/Instructor
Washington, DC
240-882-1234

Don’t be a S.H.E.E.P in 2011

Are you part of the herd? Video Clip: Click to Watch ATI short technical courses provide concise, practical answers to put you ahead of the pack Do you want your profession to stagnate next year? Or would a short technical course advance your career? Instead of doing the same thing, why not try something new? Technical […]
Are you part of the herd?
Are you part of the herd?
Video Clip: Click to Watch
ATI short technical courses provide concise, practical answers to put you ahead of the pack
Do you want your profession to stagnate next year? Or would a short technical course advance your career? Instead of doing the same thing, why not try something new? Technical training: Could it be just the thing for you? Since 1984, from the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has provided leading-edge public courses and onsite technical training to DoD and NASA personnel, as well as contractors. ATI short courses are designed to help you keep your professional knowledge up-to-date. Our courses provide a practical overview of space and defense technologies which provide a strong foundation for understanding the issues that must be confronted in the use, regulation and development such complex systems. Whether you are a busy engineer, a technical expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of complex systems in a short time. You will become aware of the basic vocabulary essential to interact meaningfully with your colleagues. Course Outline, Samplers, and Notes Determine for yourself the value of our courses before you sign up. Check out the new ATI channel on YouTube. Or see our samples (See Slide Samples) on some of our courses. After attending the course you will receive a full set of detailed notes from the class for future reference, as well as a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information. About ATI and the Instructors Our mission here at ATI is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses. ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology. Dates, Times and Locations For the dates and locations of all of our short courses, please access the links below. Sincerely, The ATI Courses Team P.S. Call today for registration at 410-956-8805 or 888-501-2100 or access our website at www.ATIcourses.com. For general questions please email us at ATI@ATIcourses.com.
Mark N. Lewellen
Consultant/Instructor
Washington, DC
240-882-1234

Can You Pass the Certified Systems Engineers Professional (CSEP) Exam?

Will YOU be part of the supply? Video Clip: Click to Watch Certified Systems Engineers Are In Demand Just as you would not attempt a state bar exam without studying, you should not attempt the CSEP (Certified Systems Engineer Professional) exam without preparation. By taking a preparatory course, you can yield great benefits in performance, stress […]
Will YOU be part of the supply?
Will YOU be part of the supply?
Video Clip: Click to Watch
Certified Systems Engineers Are In Demand
Just as you would not attempt a state bar exam without studying, you should not attempt the CSEP (Certified Systems Engineer Professional) exam without preparation. By taking a preparatory course, you can yield great benefits in performance, stress reduction and overall, greatly improve your chances of passing the exam. While the economy is down, the demand for systems engineers is still growing — but supply is low. To assist you in your career, the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has added a CSEP preparation course to its curriculum. Systems engineering is a profession, practice and way of doing business that concentrates on the design and application of the whole system to produce a successful product or system. The International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) has established a Professional Certification Program to provide a formal method for recognizing the knowledge and experience of systems engineers. The INCOSE CSEP rating is a coveted milestone in the career of a systems engineer, demonstrating knowledge, education and experience and is of high value to systems organizations. Course Outline, Samplers, and Notes Determine for yourself the value of our course before you sign up. For example click here to see our CSEP slide samples or click here to see ATI CSEP on YouTube. After attending the course you will receive a full set of detailed notes from the class for future reference, as well as a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information. About ATI and the Instructors The instructor for this class is Eric Honour, an international consultant and lecturer, who has nearly forty year career of complex systems development & operation. He was Founder and former President of INCOSE. He has led the development of eighteen major systems, including the Air Combat Maneuvering Instrumentation systems and the Battle Group Passive Horizon Extension System. Dates, Times and Locations The dates and locations for our CSEP courses in 2011 are listed here: February 11-12, 2011, Orlando, FL March 30-31, 2011, Minneapolis, MN September 16, 2011, Chantilly, VA For a complete ATI course list, please access the links below. Sincerely, The ATI Courses Team P.S. Call today for registration at 410-956-8805 or 888-501-2100 or access our website at www.ATIcourses.com. For general questions please email us at ATI@ATIcourses.com.
Mark N. Lewellen
Consultant/Instructor
Washington, DC
240-882-1234

DEALING WITH THE SOUTH ATLANTIC ANOMALY

The South Atlantic Anomaly is a worrisome dip in the donut-shaped Van Allen Radiation Belts off the coast of South America.  It is caused by a more-or-less permanent mismatch between the spin axis of the earth and its magnetic dipole.  An 11-degree angle exists between the two axes and, in addition, there is a 300 […]
  1. The South Atlantic Anomaly is a worrisome dip in the donut-shaped Van Allen Radiation Belts off the coast of South America.  It is caused by a more-or-less permanent mismatch between the spin axis of the earth and its magnetic dipole.  An 11-degree angle exists between the two axes and, in addition, there is a 300 mile distance between the geometric center of the earth and the center of its magnetic dipole.
These relatively small mismatches result in a localized magnetic field strength that is only about half as strong as the worldwide average value of 0.5 Gauss.  The energetic protons in the lower Van Allen Radiation Belt are trapped in the earth’s magnetic field, and, as a result, they are pulled down toward the earth’s surface in the South Atlantic Anomaly.  When low-altitude satellites fly through the South Atlantic Anomaly, they experience dramatically increased levels of radiation. Astronauts, computer chips, and solid-state sensors must be protected from the extra radiation found in the South Atlantic Anomaly.  Mission planners avoid “space walks” over that part of the world, the Hubble Space Telescope is temporarily shut down, and laptop computers carried onboard the space shuttle and in the International Space Station sometimes malfunction.  In addition, some of the Globalstar mobile communication satellites are believed to have died earlier than predicted because of the extra radiation they experienced while gliding through the South Atlantic Anomaly. Strategies designed to cope with this region of enhanced radiation include extra hardening of the onboard electronics, the use of self-annealing gallium-arsenide circuit chips, careful mission planning to avoid the worst radiation-enhanced portions of space, and careful positioning of delicate components inside the spacecraft among other heavy and dense components. 2.  As you suspected, the South Atlantic Anomaly does move, expand, and change in intensity over relatively long periods of time.  Generally, it is expanding and moving predominantly in the southwestern direction.  Its field strength is also gradually weakening (which results in stronger doses of radiation for low-altitude satellites coasting though that region of space). The Van Allen Radiation Belts, which are composed primarily of highly energetic protons, electrons and positive ions, are trapped in the earth’s magnetic field.  They are shaped like gigantic donuts in space.  These enormous belts were first discovered in 1958 by the American physicist, Dr. James Van Allen, a professor at Iowa State University, shortly after the Explorer 1 spacecraft was lofted into space. The lower Van Allen Radiation Belt reaches its peak intensity at an altitude of about 1800 miles above the earth.  It consists primarily of protons and positive ions spiraling in long, lazy loops around the earth’s magnetic lines of flux.  A sphere two feet in diameter positioned at the center of the lower Van Allen Radiation Belt would be penetrated by 20 million of these energetic protons every second of its mission.  The upper Van Allen Radiation Belt reaches its peak intensity at about 10,000 miles above the earth.  It consists primarily of electrons at substantially lower energy levels. Most of the time when the various charged particles hurtling around the magnetic flux lines reach their northernmost or southernmost latitudes, an abrupt mirror-image reflection hurls them back into the opposite direction.  But near each pole a small number of them escape, plunge to lower altitudes, and impact the hydrogen, oxygen, and argon atoms in the Earth’s atmosphere.  These collisions create the Northern and Southern Lights.  Each type of atom is associated with its own characteristic colors. The GPS satellites are, unfortunately, positioned at an altitude of 12,500 miles near the peak intensity of the upper Van Allen Radiation Belt.  The intense radiation found there damages their silicon solar cells.  Consequently, over its 7.5-year design lifetime, a typical GPS satellite loses about 25 percent of its electrical generating capacity.  Near the peak of the sun’s 11-year sunspot cycle, the belts are pumped up by the larger number of charged particles in the solar wind.  Consequently, the GPs satellites’ power levels decline even more rapidly due to these enhanced levels of radiation. A solid metallic sphere 750 miles in radius lies at the center of the earth.  Surrounding it is a liquid metal shell that swirls around due to the Earth’s rotational motion.  This moving dynamo creates the earth’s rather complicated and variable magnetic field. About 90 percent of the earth’s magnetic field comes from its simple dipole that behaves like a bar magnet with a positive pole at one end and a negative pole at the other.  The remaining 10 percent comes from the earth’s various other non-dipole components (monopoles, quadrupoles, etc.). Over the past 150 years, (during which scientific measurements have been available), the dominating dipole component has decreased in magnetic field strength by about 6 percent.  This weaker dipole, in turn, causes a systematic increase in the size of the South Atlantic Anomaly as experienced by low-altitude satellites.  During each decade, on average, the center of the South Atlantic Anomaly moves predominantly in the southwestern direction at an average rate of 0.8 degrees of longitude.  This is equivalent to a movement of 48 statute miles per decade. Over much larger intervals, the earth’s magnetic field reverses polarity, rather abruptly, at unpredictable and irregular intervals:  the North Magnetic Pole becomes the South Pole and vice versa.  On the average, these reversals are 300,000 to 1,000,000 years apart. Unequivocal evidence highlighting these dipole reversals is provided by the large magnetized strips frozen into basalt layers lining the sea floor on opposite sides of the slowly spreading mid-Atlantic ridge. 3.  According to my sources, the best and most readily available information on the status, shape, and location of the South Atlantic Anomaly and related matters, comes from NASA’s Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC).  The World Wide Web address of the center – which is maintained by NASA Goddard in Greenbelt, Maryland is: http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov/modelweb/ The letters “gsfc” in this address stand for the Goddard Space Flight Center.  I have taught short courses at the Goddard Space Flight Center for many years, but I do not know anyone who works at their modeling center.  Goddard’s headcount totals about 3000. If your organization plans to launch, operate or use satellites in space there are six different sources of radiation you may have to plan for and worry about: 1.      The various layers of the ionosphere 2.      The auroras (Northern and Southern Lights) 3.      The two major Van Allen Radiation Belts 4.      Periodic and intense solar proton events 5.      Cosmic rays originating in deep space 6.      Solar wind Fortunately, I often include material on these radiation sources in my “Orbital Mechanics” short courses, especially in the longer 5-day versions.  Discussions of the South Atlantic Anomaly are included in the portion that deals with the Van Allen Radiation Belts, including practical mitigation strategies that can help mission planner alleviate their worse detrimental effects. Tom Logsdon