ATI Features World Class Instructors for Our Short Courses

Washington, DC Tuesday, November 30, 2010 “Even I Could Learn a Thing or Two from ATI” Video Clip: Click to Watch Since 1984 ATI has provided leading-edge public courses and onsite technical training The short technical courses from the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) are designed to help you keep your professional knowledge up-to-date. Our courses provide […]
Washington, DC
Tuesday, November 30, 2010
“Even I Could Learn a Thing or Two from ATI”
“Even I Could Learn a Thing or Two from ATI”
Video Clip: Click to Watch
Since 1984 ATI has provided leading-edge public courses and onsite technical training
The short technical courses from the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) are designed to help you keep your professional knowledge up-to-date. Our courses provide a practical overview of space and defense technologies which provide a strong foundation for understanding the issues that must be confronted in the use, regulation and development such complex systems. The classes are designed for individuals involved in planning, designing, building, launching, and operating space and defense systems. Whether you are a busy engineer, a technical expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of complex systems in a short time. ABOUT ATI AND THE INSTRUCTORS Our mission here at the ATI is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses. ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology. For example: Robert Fry worked from 1979 to 2007 at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory where he was a member of the Principal Professional Staff. He is now working at System Engineering Group (SEG) where he is Corporate Senior Staff and also serves as the company-wide technical advisor. Throughout his career he has been involved in the development of new combat weapon system concepts, development of system requirements, and balancing allocations within the fire control loop between sensing and weapon kinematic capabilities. He has worked on many aspects of the AEGIS combat system including AAW, BMD, AN/SPY-1, and multi-mission requirements development. Missile system development experience includes SM-2, SM-3, SM-6, Patriot, THAAD, HARPOON, AMRAAM, TOMAHAWK, and other missile systems. Robert teaches ATI’s Combat Systems Engineering course Wayne Tustin has been president of Equipment Reliability Institute (ERI), a specialized engineering school and consultancy he founded in Santa Barbara, CA, since 1995. His BSEE degree is from the University of Washington, Seattle. He is a licensed Professional Engineer in the State of California. Wayne’s first encounter with vibration was at Boeing/Seattle, performing what later came to be called modal tests, on the XB-52 prototype of that highly reliable platform. Subsequently he headed field service and technical training for a manufacturer of electrodynamic shakers, before establishing another specialized school on which he left his name. Based on over 50 years of professional experience, Wayne has written several books and literally hundreds of articles dealing with practical aspects of vibration and shock measurement and testing. Wayne teaches ATI’s Fundamentals of Random Vibration & Shock Testing course. Thomas S. Logsdon, M.S For more than 30 years, Thomas S. Logsdon, M. S., has worked on the Navstar GPS and other related technologies at the Naval Ordinance Laboratory, McDonnell Douglas, Lockheed Martin, Boeing Aerospace, and Rockwell International. His research projects and consulting assignments have included the Transit Navigation Satellites, The Tartar and Talos shipboard missiles, and the Navstar GPS. In addition, he has helped put astronauts on the moon and guide their colleagues on rendezvous missions headed toward the Skylab capsule. Some of his more challenging assignments have centered around constellation coverage studies, GPS performance enhancement, military applications, spacecraft survivability, differential navigation, booster rocket guidance using the GPS signals and shipboard attitude determination. Tom Logsdon has taught short courses and lectured in thirty one different countries. He has written and published forty technical papers and journal articles, a dozen of which have dealt with military and civilian radionavigation techniques. He is also the author of twenty nine technical books on various engineering and scientific subjects. These include Understanding the Navstar, Orbital Mechanics: Theory and Applications, Mobile Communication Satellites, and The Navstar Global Positioning System. Courses Mr. Logsdon teaches through ATI include: Understanding Space Fundamentals of Orbital & Launch Mechanics GPS Technology – Solutions for Earth & Space and Strapdown Inertial Navigation Systems COURSE OUTLINE, SAMPLERS, AND NOTES Determine for yourself the value of our courses before you sign up. See our samples (See Slide Samples) on some of our courses. Or check out the new ATI channel on YouTube. After attending the course you will receive a full set of detailed notes from the class for future reference, as well as a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information. DATES, TIMES AND LOCATIONS For the dates and locations of all of our short courses, please access the links below. Sincerely, The ATI Courses Team P.S. Call today for registration at 410-956-8805 or 888-501-2100 or access our website at www.ATIcourses.com. For general questions please email us at ATI@ATIcourses.com.
Mark N. Lewellen
Consultant/Instructor
Washington, DC
240-882-1234

Why Not Give Yourself the Gift of a Short Course this Holiday Season?

Washington, DC Monday, November 29, 2010 Is One of These Yours? Video Clip: Click to Watch When Did You Last do Something for Your Career? Since 1984, the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has provided leading-edge public courses and onsite technical training to DoD and NASA personnel, as well as contractors. Our courses provide a practical overview of space […]
Washington, DC
Monday, November 29, 2010
Is One of These Yours?
Is One of These Yours?
Video Clip: Click to Watch
When Did You Last do Something for Your Career?
Since 1984, the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has provided leading-edge public courses and onsite technical training to DoD and NASA personnel, as well as contractors. Our courses provide a practical overview of space and defense technologies which provide a strong foundation for understanding the issues that must be confronted in the use, regulation and development such complex systems. ATI short courses are designed to help you keep your professional knowledge up-to-date. Our short courses are designed for individuals involved in planning, designing, building, launching, and operating space and defense systems. Whether you are a busy engineer, a technical expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of complex systems in a short time. You will become aware of the basic vocabulary essential to interact meaningfully with your colleagues. Course Outline, Samplers, and Notes Determine for yourself the value of our courses before you sign up. See our samples (See Slide Samples) on some of our courses. Or check out the new ATI channel on YouTube. After attending the course you will receive a full set of detailed notes from the class for future reference, as well as a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information. About ATI and the Instructors Our mission here at the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses. ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology. Dates, Times and Locations For the dates and locations of all of our short courses, please access the links below. Sincerely, The ATI Courses Team P.S Call today for registration at 410-956-8805 or 888-501-2100 or access our website at www.ATIcourses.com. For general questions please email us at ATI@ATIcourses.com.
Mark N. Lewellen
Consultant/Instructor
Washington, DC
240-882-1234

Are You Thinking About Updating Your Technical Skills?

Don’t just think. Do it. Video Clip: Click to Watch It could be as easy as taking a short course or two to stay current in your field Do you when was the last time you updated your current skills or learned new ones? Our mission here at the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) is to provide […]
Don’t just think.  Do it.
Don’t just think. Do it.
Video Clip: Click to Watch
It could be as easy as taking a short course or two to stay current in your field
Do you when was the last time you updated your current skills or learned new ones? Our mission here at the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) is to provide you expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses. ATI short courses are designed to help you keep your professional knowledge up-to-date. Our courses provide a practical overview of space and defense technologies which provide a strong foundation for understanding the issues that must be confronted in the use, regulation and development such complex systems. Whether you are a busy engineer, a technical expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of complex systems in a short time. You will become aware of the basic vocabulary essential to interact meaningfully with your colleagues. Our courses cover the following technical areas: • Acoustic & Sonar Engineering courses • Radar, Missiles and Combat Systems courses • Project Management and Systems Engineering courses • Engineering & Data Analysis courses • Communications & Networking courses • Satellites & Space-Related courses Course Outline, Samplers, and Notes Determine for yourself the value of our courses before you sign up. See our samples (See Slide Samples) on some of our courses. Or check out the new ATI channel on YouTube. After attending the course you will receive a full set of detailed notes from the class for future reference, as well as a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information. About ATI and the Instructors Our mission here at ATI is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses. ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology. Dates, Times and Locations For the dates and locations of all of our short courses, please access the links below. Sincerely, The ATI Courses Team P.S. Call today for registration at 410-956-8805 or 888-501-2100 or access our website at www.ATIcourses.com. For general questions please email us at ATI@ATIcourses.com.

DEALING WITH THE SOUTH ATLANTIC ANOMALY

The South Atlantic Anomaly is a worrisome dip in the donut-shaped Van Allen Radiation Belts off the coast of South America.  It is caused by a more-or-less permanent mismatch between the spin axis of the earth and its magnetic dipole.  An 11-degree angle exists between the two axes and, in addition, there is a 300 […]
  1. The South Atlantic Anomaly is a worrisome dip in the donut-shaped Van Allen Radiation Belts off the coast of South America.  It is caused by a more-or-less permanent mismatch between the spin axis of the earth and its magnetic dipole.  An 11-degree angle exists between the two axes and, in addition, there is a 300 mile distance between the geometric center of the earth and the center of its magnetic dipole.
These relatively small mismatches result in a localized magnetic field strength that is only about half as strong as the worldwide average value of 0.5 Gauss.  The energetic protons in the lower Van Allen Radiation Belt are trapped in the earth’s magnetic field, and, as a result, they are pulled down toward the earth’s surface in the South Atlantic Anomaly.  When low-altitude satellites fly through the South Atlantic Anomaly, they experience dramatically increased levels of radiation. Astronauts, computer chips, and solid-state sensors must be protected from the extra radiation found in the South Atlantic Anomaly.  Mission planners avoid “space walks” over that part of the world, the Hubble Space Telescope is temporarily shut down, and laptop computers carried onboard the space shuttle and in the International Space Station sometimes malfunction.  In addition, some of the Globalstar mobile communication satellites are believed to have died earlier than predicted because of the extra radiation they experienced while gliding through the South Atlantic Anomaly. Strategies designed to cope with this region of enhanced radiation include extra hardening of the onboard electronics, the use of self-annealing gallium-arsenide circuit chips, careful mission planning to avoid the worst radiation-enhanced portions of space, and careful positioning of delicate components inside the spacecraft among other heavy and dense components. 2.  As you suspected, the South Atlantic Anomaly does move, expand, and change in intensity over relatively long periods of time.  Generally, it is expanding and moving predominantly in the southwestern direction.  Its field strength is also gradually weakening (which results in stronger doses of radiation for low-altitude satellites coasting though that region of space). The Van Allen Radiation Belts, which are composed primarily of highly energetic protons, electrons and positive ions, are trapped in the earth’s magnetic field.  They are shaped like gigantic donuts in space.  These enormous belts were first discovered in 1958 by the American physicist, Dr. James Van Allen, a professor at Iowa State University, shortly after the Explorer 1 spacecraft was lofted into space. The lower Van Allen Radiation Belt reaches its peak intensity at an altitude of about 1800 miles above the earth.  It consists primarily of protons and positive ions spiraling in long, lazy loops around the earth’s magnetic lines of flux.  A sphere two feet in diameter positioned at the center of the lower Van Allen Radiation Belt would be penetrated by 20 million of these energetic protons every second of its mission.  The upper Van Allen Radiation Belt reaches its peak intensity at about 10,000 miles above the earth.  It consists primarily of electrons at substantially lower energy levels. Most of the time when the various charged particles hurtling around the magnetic flux lines reach their northernmost or southernmost latitudes, an abrupt mirror-image reflection hurls them back into the opposite direction.  But near each pole a small number of them escape, plunge to lower altitudes, and impact the hydrogen, oxygen, and argon atoms in the Earth’s atmosphere.  These collisions create the Northern and Southern Lights.  Each type of atom is associated with its own characteristic colors. The GPS satellites are, unfortunately, positioned at an altitude of 12,500 miles near the peak intensity of the upper Van Allen Radiation Belt.  The intense radiation found there damages their silicon solar cells.  Consequently, over its 7.5-year design lifetime, a typical GPS satellite loses about 25 percent of its electrical generating capacity.  Near the peak of the sun’s 11-year sunspot cycle, the belts are pumped up by the larger number of charged particles in the solar wind.  Consequently, the GPs satellites’ power levels decline even more rapidly due to these enhanced levels of radiation. A solid metallic sphere 750 miles in radius lies at the center of the earth.  Surrounding it is a liquid metal shell that swirls around due to the Earth’s rotational motion.  This moving dynamo creates the earth’s rather complicated and variable magnetic field. About 90 percent of the earth’s magnetic field comes from its simple dipole that behaves like a bar magnet with a positive pole at one end and a negative pole at the other.  The remaining 10 percent comes from the earth’s various other non-dipole components (monopoles, quadrupoles, etc.). Over the past 150 years, (during which scientific measurements have been available), the dominating dipole component has decreased in magnetic field strength by about 6 percent.  This weaker dipole, in turn, causes a systematic increase in the size of the South Atlantic Anomaly as experienced by low-altitude satellites.  During each decade, on average, the center of the South Atlantic Anomaly moves predominantly in the southwestern direction at an average rate of 0.8 degrees of longitude.  This is equivalent to a movement of 48 statute miles per decade. Over much larger intervals, the earth’s magnetic field reverses polarity, rather abruptly, at unpredictable and irregular intervals:  the North Magnetic Pole becomes the South Pole and vice versa.  On the average, these reversals are 300,000 to 1,000,000 years apart. Unequivocal evidence highlighting these dipole reversals is provided by the large magnetized strips frozen into basalt layers lining the sea floor on opposite sides of the slowly spreading mid-Atlantic ridge. 3.  According to my sources, the best and most readily available information on the status, shape, and location of the South Atlantic Anomaly and related matters, comes from NASA’s Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC).  The World Wide Web address of the center – which is maintained by NASA Goddard in Greenbelt, Maryland is: http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov/modelweb/ The letters “gsfc” in this address stand for the Goddard Space Flight Center.  I have taught short courses at the Goddard Space Flight Center for many years, but I do not know anyone who works at their modeling center.  Goddard’s headcount totals about 3000. If your organization plans to launch, operate or use satellites in space there are six different sources of radiation you may have to plan for and worry about: 1.      The various layers of the ionosphere 2.      The auroras (Northern and Southern Lights) 3.      The two major Van Allen Radiation Belts 4.      Periodic and intense solar proton events 5.      Cosmic rays originating in deep space 6.      Solar wind Fortunately, I often include material on these radiation sources in my “Orbital Mechanics” short courses, especially in the longer 5-day versions.  Discussions of the South Atlantic Anomaly are included in the portion that deals with the Van Allen Radiation Belts, including practical mitigation strategies that can help mission planner alleviate their worse detrimental effects. Tom Logsdon

Top Ten Reasons Why You Should Attend a Short Technical Course from ATI

Washington, DC Monday, November 15, 2010 HOT off the press!!! Video Clip: Click to Watch ATI specializes in short course technical training in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing Here are the top ten reasons why you should attend a short technical course from ATI: 1. Our world class instructors love to teach 2. […]
Washington, DC
Monday, November 15, 2010
HOT off the press!!!
HOT off the press!!!
Video Clip: Click to Watch
ATI specializes in short course technical training in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing
Here are the top ten reasons why you should attend a short technical course from ATI: 1. Our world class instructors love to teach 2. Both fundamental and advanced technical courses are offered 3. Convenient locations all around the country 4. Short courses take less than a week 5. Take only the classes you need 6. Our focus is on space and defense technology, just like yours 7. If there are eight or more people who are interested in a course, you save money if we bring the course to you. 8. If you have fifteen or more students, you save over fifty percent compared to a public course. 9. You will gain an understanding of the basic vocabulary needed in order to interact meaningfully with your colleagues. 10. After attending the course you will receive a full set of detailed notes from the class for future reference, as well as a certificate of completion Since 1984, the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has provided leading-edge public courses and onsite technical training to DoD and NASA personnel, as well as contractors. ATI short courses are designed to help you keep your professional knowledge up-to-date. Our classes provide a practical overview of space and defense technologies which provide a strong foundation for understanding the issues that must be confronted in the use, regulation and development such complex systems. Whether you are a busy engineer, an aviation expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of space-related systems without missing much time from work. Course Outline, Samplers, and Notes Determine for yourself the value of our courses before you sign up. See our samples (See Slide Samples) on some of our courses. Or check out the new ATI channel on YouTube. After attending the course you will receive a full set of detailed notes from the class for future reference, as well as a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information. About ATI and the Instructors Our mission here at the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses. ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology. Dates, Times and Locations For the dates and locations of all of our short courses, please access the links below. Sincerely, The ATI Courses Team P.S. Call today for registration at 410-956-8805 or 888-501-2100 or access our website at ATIcourses. For general questions please email us at ATI@ATIcourses.com.
Mark N. Lewellen
Consultant/Instructor
Washington, DC
240-882-1234

Clearance Sale: Radar, Antennas & Electronic Warfare Textbooks

Best Sellers There’s a reason behind this bit of “peer pressure”…each of these books were perused at length by your peers before purchase. Principles of Modern Radar: Basic Principles Mark Richards, Jim Scheer, Bill Holm Special price: $105 Introduction to Adaptive Arrays, 2nd Ed. Bob Monzingo, Randy Haupt, Tom Miller Special Preliminary Paperback $69 We […]
Best Sellers
POMR CoverThere’s a reason behind this bit of “peer pressure”…each of these books were perused at length by your peers before purchase. Principles of Modern Radar: Basic Principles Mark Richards, Jim Scheer, Bill Holm Special price: $105
Monzingo/Haupt/MillerIntroduction to Adaptive Arrays, 2nd Ed. Bob Monzingo, Randy Haupt, Tom Miller Special Preliminary Paperback $69
We printed a number of paperbacks just in time for the conference and you can get these now for only $69!
Save Now – Radar
Principles of Waveform Diversity and Design Michael Wicks et al, 2010, List: $189, Now $149
Phased Array Radar Design Tom Jeffrey, 2009, List $89, Now $65
Fundamentals of Ground Radar for ATC Engineers and… Ronald Bouwman, 2009, List $129, Now $89
Introduction to Sensors for Ranging and Imaging Graham Brooker, 2009, List $119, Now $75
Understanding Radar: The ABCs of How Radar Systems… Arnold Acker, 2009, List $99, Now $29
Theory of Edge Diffraction in Electromagnetics… Pyotr Ufimtsev, 2009, List $99, Now $69
Advances in Bistatic Radar Willis & Griffiths, 2007, List $149, Now $99
Design of Multi-Frequency CW Radars Mohinder Jankariman, 2007, List $129, Now $89
Radar Cross Section Measurements Eugene F. Knott, 2006, List $115, Now $69
Bistatic Radar, 2nd Edition Nicholas J. Willis, 2005, List $89, Now $39
Radar Foundations for Imaging and Advanced Concepts Roger Sullivan, 2004, List $105, Now $69
Radar Principles for the Non-Specialist, 3rd Ed. Toomay & Hannen, 2004, List $59, Now $39
Airborne Early Warning System Concepts, 3rd Ed. Maurice Long, 2004, List $115, Now $45
Introduction to RF Stealth David Lynch, Jr., 2004, List $139, Now $39
Radar Cross Section, 2nd Ed. Knott et al, 2004, List $109, Now $69
Radar Detection DiFranco & Rubin, 2004, List $115, Now $59
Understanding Synthetic Aperture Radar Images Oliver & Quegan, 2004, List $109, Now $59
Low Angle Radar Land Clutter Billingsley, 2002, List $149, Now $79
Understanding Radar Systems Kingsley & Quegan, List $85, Now $39
Save Now – Antennas

Antennas: Fundamentals, Design, Measurement, 3rd Ed.

Blake & Long, 2009, List $99, Now $79

Antennas: Deluxe Edition with MathCad 14.0 Blake & Long, 2009, List $149, Now $119 This is the same book inside as the above listed title, just with a full featured single-user MathCad included (that’s HUGE savings on this software).

Microstrip and Printed Antennas, 2nd Ed.

Randy Bancroft, 2009, List $99, Now $69

Introduction to Antenna Fundamentals (CD)

Steven Best, 2004, List $129, Now $29

Introduction to Antennas (3 CD Set) Steven Best, 2004, List $297, Now $145

The above CD “Intro to Antenna Fundamentals” is included in this set of 3 CDs. Do not purchase both 🙂

Antenna Design and Visualization Using MATLAB 2.0 Elsherbeni & Inman, 2009, List $89, Now $59

Save Now – Electronic Warfare
Introduction to Electronic Defense Systems, 2nd Ed. Filippo Neri, 2006, List $109, Now $69
James Tsui, 2004, List $109, Now $59
Microwave Passive Direction Finding Stephen Lipsky, 2004, List $95, Now $49
Prices are only good until October 31.  We’ll have more titles to share next week!

‘VIRGINIA’-CLASS SUBMARINE PROGRAM SAILS INTO FULL RATE PRODUCTION

The USN’s ‘Virginia’-class submarine program recently achieved ‘Milestone III’ and full rate production approval with the signing of an acquisition decision memorandum by the under secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics. The achievement of Milestone III coincides with the program transitioning to a schedule involving the construction of two submarines per year, starting […]
The USN’s ‘Virginia’-class submarine program recently achieved ‘Milestone III’ and full rate production approval with the signing of an acquisition decision memorandum by the under secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics. The achievement of Milestone III coincides with the program transitioning to a schedule involving the construction of two submarines per year, starting in fiscal year 2011. Construction of the first two Block III vessels began in March 2009 (SSN-784) and March 2010 (SSN-785). The seventh ship of the class, the ‘Missouri’ (SSN-780) was commissioned on 31 July 2010. There are five additional ‘Virginia’-class submarines under construction, and six more under contract.

LOCKHEED TO PROVIDE AEGIS COMBAT SYSTEM FOR AUSTRALIA

Lockheed has been awarded a cost-plus-fixed-fee performance incentives contract for post-critical design review (CDR) Aegis combat systems engineering to support the Australian Government. The Australian Government has selected the Aegis combat system for its air warfare destroyer (AWD) program.. Under the $197m foreign military sale, Lockheed will provide combat systems engineering, computer program development, technical […]
Lockheed has been awarded a cost-plus-fixed-fee performance incentives contract for post-critical design review (CDR) Aegis combat systems engineering to support the Australian Government. The Australian Government has selected the Aegis combat system for its air warfare destroyer (AWD) program.. Under the $197m foreign military sale, Lockheed will provide combat systems engineering, computer program development, technical manuals, ship integration and test. The company will also design and build an Aegis weapon system (AWS) based on the US Navy AWS Baseline 7 phase I to support the AWD program. The US Naval Sea Systems Command is the prime contractor and work will be carried out at the company’s facilities in US and Australia. The contract also includes options that, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value to $211m. Work is expected to be complete by December 2014.

NASA Hosting Workshop With Technical Information About Space Exploration

The charts provide a basis for engagement with outside organizations, including international entities, industry, academia and other government agencies. Involving outside groups helps NASA make informed decisions as program objectives and expectations are established. To view workshop presentations, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/new_space_enterprise/home/workshop_home.html Day 1 briefings will be made available below in PDF format and Day 1 video […]
The charts provide a basis for engagement with outside organizations, including international entities, industry, academia and other government agencies. Involving outside groups helps NASA make informed decisions as program objectives and expectations are established. To view workshop presentations, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/new_space_enterprise/home/workshop_home.html Day 1 briefings will be made available below in PDF format and Day 1 video will be made available within one week. A New Space Enterprise (PDF, 9.7 MB)Chris Moore (PDF, 2.5 MB) Exploration Technology Development & Demonstration (ETDD); Heavy Lift & Propulsion Technology (HL&PT) > Cris Guidi (PDF, 840 KB) Flagship Technology Demonstrations (FTD) > Mike Conley (PDF, 8.7 MB) Explorations Precursor Robotic Missions (xPRM) > Jay Jenkins (PDF, 2.2 MB) Commercial Crew (CC) > Phil McAlister (PDF, 455 KB) Participatory Exploration (PE) > Kathy Nado (PDF, 500 KB) Panel Q&A/ Wrap-Up > Mike Conley, Douglas Cooke, Cris Guidi, Michael Hecker, Jay Jenkins, Laurie Leshin, Phil McAlister, Chris Moore, Kathy Nado If you enjoyed this information:
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New Course Explores Science of Noise Impacting Marine Mammals

Applied Technology Institute Introduces New Course: Underwater Acoustics for Biologists and Conservation Managers New course explores the science of noise that impacts marine mammals and other ocean life (ANNAPOLIS. Md, May 17, 2010) Technical professional development training company, Applied Technology Institute (ATI), is introducing a new course, Underwater Acoustics for Biologists and Conservation Managers. The […]
The Beluga whale is one of over 120 species of marine mammals impacted by ocean noise.
The Beluga whale is one of over 120 species of marine mammals impacted by ocean noise.
Applied Technology Institute Introduces New Course: Underwater Acoustics for Biologists and Conservation Managers New course explores the science of noise that impacts marine mammals and other ocean life (ANNAPOLIS. Md, May 17, 2010) Technical professional development training company, Applied Technology Institute (ATI), is introducing a new course, Underwater Acoustics for Biologists and Conservation Managers. The three-day course is designed for biologists and conservation managers who wish to enhance their understanding of the underlying principles behind underwater and engineering acoustics. Understanding this science is critical to the success of marine research facilities that are responsible for evaluating the impact of anthropogenic noise on marine life. Target audiences will include marine research facilities like the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Currently the NOAA is overseeing the BP oil spill clean up that occurred in the Gulf of Mexico last week. The NOAA umbrella organization includes divisions responsible not only for environmental clean up emergencies, but also for assessing biological harm to marine life through the NOAA Fisheries Services division. Take this course to make better assessments of the impact of sound on marine life Specific course outline points include learning about key characteristics of man-made sound sources, evaluating sound fields from impulsive coherent and continuous sources, discussing how system characteristics are measured and calibrated, as well as what animal characteristics are important for assessing both impact and requirements for monitoring and mitigation. By the conclusion of the course attendees will have obtained the knowledge to perform basic assessments of the impact of anthropogenic sources on marine life in specific ocean environments, and to understand the uncertainties in their assessments. Together, ATI Instructors, Dr. William T. Ellison and Dr. Orest Diachok, bring more than eighty years of expertise in marine acoustics and biology to share with attendees. The full course outline can be viewed on ATI’s website at: Course Outline: Underwater Acoustics Biologists Conservation Managers Sample materials are available on ATI’s website for prospective attendees interested in seeing the value of the course before registering. Click on the following: Sample Materials: Underwater Acoustics Biologists Conservation Managers Date, Time and Location: The first class will be offered from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm on June 15-17, 2010 in Silver Spring, MD (just outside of Washington, DC). Space is limited. Call today to reserve a seat. Sincerely, The ATI Courses Team P.S. For registration: Call today at 410-956-8805 or 888-501-2100 or go online now at ATIcourses.com About Us The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) specializes in professional development seminars in the technical areas of Space, Communications, Defense, Sonar, Radar, and Signal Processing. For over twenty-five years, ATI has presented leading-edge technical training to defense and NASA facilities, as well as DoD and aerospace contractors. ATI courses provide a clear understanding of the fundamental principles and a working knowledge of current technology and applications. ATI has the unique capability to schedule and deliver courses in a matter of weeks. They offer customized on-site training at your facility anywhere in the United States, as well as internationally and over 100 public courses annually in dozens of locations. World-class design experts lead courses. To register or for an on-site quote, call (888) 501-2100, or visit them on the web at www.ATIcourses.com If you enjoyed this information:
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Who invented the metric system?

Mr. Pat Naughtin (who contacted us recently) read Dr. Robert Nelson’s International System Of Units. He also brought up some interesting information on the history metric system to our attention. The three parts of the decimal metric system were originally developed in 1585, 1668, and 1675. Then the three parts were put together in several […]
Mr. Pat Naughtin (who contacted us recently) read Dr. Robert Nelson’s International System Of Units. He also brought up some interesting information on the history metric system to our attention.

The three parts of the decimal metric system were originally developed in 1585, 1668, and 1675. Then the three parts were put together in several different places at a fourth time. The crucial time in the combination of the various ideas that formed the decimal metric system mostly came together in the year 1790. You can read the full article by Mr. Pat Naughin here: http://www.metricationmatters.com/who-invented-the-metric-system.html

This supporting documents could also be of interest:

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The View from a Training Manager’s Perspective

This week we interviewed the Training Manager of one of our longtime clients, a major Research and Development Company in the DC Metro area.  For more than fifteen years, this R&D company has trusted ATI to deliver the technical training needed for the success of their projects. ATI has worked hand-in-hand with their Training Department […]

This week we interviewed the Training Manager of one of our longtime clients, a major Research and Development Company in the DC Metro area.  For more than fifteen years, this R&D company has trusted ATI to deliver the technical training needed for the success of their projects. ATI has worked hand-in-hand with their Training Department to present customized, and frequently, repeat installments of popular scientific and engineering courses on-site at their facility.  The conversation outlined the following Top Three Training Challenges she currently faces:

 

 

Challenge #1: Red Tape Bureaucracy!

 

In order to get courses scheduled their company faces a lengthy approval process by committee of their Department heads. They have to analyze each proposed course outline to be certain the course meets particular criteria and is relevant to the company’s current projects to justify the cost. 

 

Challenge #2 Reactive Not Proactive

 

Currently their company does not have an annual Training Needs Assessment. The current protocol is to wait until a supervisor or head of a project says they need a particular type of technical training. Only then does the Department Head generate a Training Needs Assessment to determine 1) What training the group has taken in the past and 2) What course would meet their training objectives so they can successfully complete the project.  Ultimately the reactive system does not allow the Training Manager to anticipate what projects are ahead. Therefore, scheduling the appropriate training proves difficult.

 

There is hope for change in sight. Their Director of Training is to meet with the HR teams assigned to each department to determine what training the employees have had in the past and what training they will need in the future. But change is slow to come (see Challenge #1, Red Tape Bureaucracy!)

 

Challenge #3 Budget Cuts

 

Budget cuts are a problem for them as well. Because of this company’s affiliation with the U.S. government, training dollars are down. In an effort to be more fiscally responsible, training has been cut.

 

Now here’s where you come in!

 

We invite you to participate in this conversation and tell us what training challenges you currently face.

 

After we receive your input, we will continue the conversation in a Training Challenges Part 2 post summarizing your responses and exploring solutions to your training challenges, so we encourage you to weigh-in now so your opinion can be counted!

 

 

To Give Us Your Feedback:

 

Click ‘comment’ below. To post anonymously, feel free to use the name “guest” or “anon”. Your email will not be visible on the blog.

 

 

159th meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (April 19-23,2010)

Acoustical Society of America held 159th meeting on on noise and noise control at Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel in Baltimore, MD on April 19-23, 2010. Lister below are just a few of the meeting’s many interesting noise-related talks. 1) Aviation Engineering: STIFLING THE SONIC BOOM 2) City Noise: IDENTIFYING THE SOUNDS OF CRISIS 3) Human […]
Acoustical Society of America held 159th meeting on on noise and noise control at Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel in Baltimore, MD on April 19-23, 2010. Lister below are just a few of the meeting’s many interesting noise-related talks. 1) Aviation Engineering: STIFLING THE SONIC BOOM 2) City Noise: IDENTIFYING THE SOUNDS OF CRISIS 3) Human Noises: SOUND LEVELS IN THE ARCTIC OCEAN 4) Community Noise Mitigation: PUBLIC OUTREACH WORKSHOP 5) Noise Inside a Car: QUIET CONCRETE ROADS 6) Construction Noise: “NO RACKET” JACKET FOR JACK HAMMER 7) Signal Processing: NOISE FILTERING FOR THE HEARING IMPAIRED 8) Noise in Healthcare Settings: NEW LEGAL STANDARDS 9) More Highlights — OTHER INTERESTING SESSIONS 10) More Information for Journalists ———————————————————- 1) Aviation Engineering: Stifling the Sonic Boom SONIC “PUFF” TECHNOLOGY MAY SPEED SUPERSONIC FLIGHT OVER LAND For the last 40 years, commercial aviation has hit a speed barrier in regulations prohibiting supersonic flight over land. These aim to limit the negative impact of loud sonic booms on populated areas, and current regulations permit commercial supersonic flight only over oceans, significantly limiting the speed benefit from supersonic flight. New aircraft configurations are emerging that are shaped to minimize the shock waves associated with sonic booms and may allow supersonic speed over land. Talk #1aNCa1, “Sonic boom: From bang to puff” is at 8:05 a.m. on Monday, April 19. Abstract: http://asa.aip.org/web2/asa/abstracts/search.may10/asa53.html ———————————————————- 2) City Noise: Identifying the Sounds of Crisis ACOUSTIC AND SEISMIC SENSORS IN BALTIMORE HELP SORT COMPLEX CITY SOUNDS Beeping, shouting, construction, the sounds of tires on roads, and other loud noises — all partly masked by mazes of tall buildings — make up the fabric of the modern urban soundscape. To urban sound sleuths such as Donald G. Albert, a scientist with the Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, in Hanover, NH, this complex soundscape is a challenge. He is tasked with developing a way to use sensors to sort out the complex bounce of signals, noise, scattered sounds, echoes, and vibrations in urban environments. Talk #1pNSc1, “Urban acoustic and seismic noise measurements in Baltimore” is at 1:30 p.m. on Monday, April 19. Abstract: http://asa.aip.org/web2/asa/abstracts/search.may10/asa238.html ———————————————————- 3) Human Noises in the Arctic LOSS OF POLAR ICE INCREASES BOAT TRAFFIC AND SOUND LEVELS IN ARCTIC OCEAN With the melting of polar ice, never before in modern life has so much open ocean water been accessible in the Arctic. And where there’s water, there is opportunity for commercial shipping, and where shipping lanes emerge, big boats — and big noise — may follow. Talk #1aAO1, “The accessible Arctic Ocean” is at 9:05 a.m. on Monday, April 19. Abstract: http://asa.aip.org/web2/asa/abstracts/search.may10/asa26.html ———————————————————- 4) Community Noise Mitigation: Public Outreach Workshop NOISE HAS A PROFOUND LOCAL IMPACT — EVEN IF FEDERAL POLICY DOES NOT Community noise is a major social problem that generally decreases the quality of life for many people in the United States, and it is continuing to grow — especially in major urban areas. In cities like Baltimore, community noise causes a variety of problems for local residents — from simple annoyances to profound negative impacts on human health. The workshop will include a panel of prominent national speakers on community noise control who will make presentations on a variety of topics faced by residents of Baltimore, including the noise situation in Baltimore, desired local government responses, the Baltimore noise ordinance, the Maryland noise control regulation, and the role of federal, state and local governments in addressing community noise issues. The Workshop will also give the first brief overview of a forthcoming National Academy of Engineering study titled “Technology for a Quieter America,” which will be published later this year. ———————————————————- 5) Noise Inside a Car QUIET CONCRETE PAVEMENT IS KEY TO MORE QUIET RIDE The stereo test tells all: You’re in the driver’s seat, buckled in, mirrors adjusted, traffic checked, in gear. Rolling. Cue the sound system, crank the volume, and crank it again. And then crank it again. This simple diagnostic is revealing: If you have to keep turning your stereo up as you drive to hear the music, you likely have “noisy pavement” under your tires. April 19. Abstract: http://asa.aip.org/web2/asa/abstracts/search.may10/asa210.html ———————————————————- 6) Construction Noise QUIETING THE SOUNDS OF PROGRESS — THE “NO-RACKET JACKET” New York City is constantly maintaining, repairing, and reinventing itself, ongoing work that creates a lot of construction noise. However, a collaborative team including the New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), consultants, utilities and an equipment vendor are working together to quiet the sounds of progress and improve the quality of life for those who live and work in the city. In furthering the city’s commitment to reducing noise is embodied in a new noise code and new construction rules, the DEP team wanted to look at ways to eliminate jackhammer noise — an annoyance for residents and businesses and an important occupational hazard for construction workers. Talk #2pNCa9, “Proactive regulation engenders creative innovation: Quieting the jack hammer” is at 3:00 p.m. on Tuesday, April 20. Abstract: http://asa.aip.org/web2/asa/abstracts/search.may10/asa478.html ———————————————————- 7) Signal Processing: Noise Filtering for the Hearing Impaired A SOLUTION FOR IMPROVING SPEECH INTELLIGIBILITY FOR THE HEARING IMPAIRED Recall what it is like trying to focus on a conversation in a crowded and noisy bar — and then imagine having to do this even in a relatively quiet room. This is exactly the challenge that faces many people who rely on hearing aids or have cochlear implants. While these technological advances make it possible for many to hear who would not otherwise, they do not allow the individual to filter out background noise. Talk #2aSC1, “Noise-suppression algorithms for improved speech intelligibility by normal-hearing and cochlear implant listeners” is at 8:05 a.m. on Tuesday, April 20. Abstract: http://asa.aip.org/web2/asa/abstracts/search.may10/asa410.html ———————————————————- 8) Noise in Healthcare Settings NEW ACOUSTICAL STANDARDS PRESENT BOTH CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES A pair of new documents on healthcare acoustics, which have just been released after five years of peer review and public comment, are described by one of their authors as both a carrot and a stick. They set measurable minimum acoustical standards for the health care industry, and because these new standards have already been adopted by the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating system, they are the basis for two new Environmental Quality credits. Because of Health Insurance and Portability Act (HIPAA) rules and new conditions imposed last November by Obama’s ARRA HITECH Act, there are serious fines (up to $1.5 million) for non-compliance. Talk #2aNSc11, “Strengthening the healthcare guidelines: About the new online research community” is at 11:40 a.m. on Tuesday, April 20. Abstract: http://asa.aip.org/web2/asa/abstracts/search.may10/asa369.html Talk #2pAAa1, “Speech privacy: The new 2010 architectural guidelines” is at 1:00 p.m. on Tuesday, April 20. Abstract: http://asa.aip.org/web2/asa/abstracts/search.may10/asa438.html ———————————————————- 9) MORE HIGHLIGHTS — OTHER INTERESTING SESSIONS ON NOISE In addition to the highlighted talks above, there are many other interesting noise-related talks and sessions at the meeting — some of which are listed below. For a complete list of abstracts for any of these sessions, go to the searchable index for the 159th Meeting (http://asa.aip.org/asasearch.html) and enter the session number with asterisk (e.g., 1aNSa*).

NASA Is To Use Social Media: Open Government Plan

NASA recently embraced open government plan (see the plan here). This is great news for anyone interested in space exploration! The new plan will enable the public to communicate directly with NASA scientists as well make suggestions and propose solutions to everyday challenges of various projects. Whether NASA is using social networks to allow students […]
NASA recently embraced open government plan (see the plan here). This is great news for anyone interested in space exploration! The new plan will enable the public to communicate directly with NASA scientists as well make suggestions and propose solutions to everyday challenges of various projects. Whether NASA is using social networks to allow students to interact directly with astronauts or creating a Cloud Computing Platform to give unprecedented access to scientific data, NASA has embraced Open Government. Our founding legislation in 1958 instructed NASA to “…provide for the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination of information…” The principles of Open Government have been embedded in NASA operations for 50 plus years. This plan is our start in revisiting these concepts and creating a new level of openness and accountability in our policies, technology, and overall culture. The plan will evolve over time as we continue to see success in these areas and work to replicate it throughout the Agency. The NASA Open Government Plan is divided into two main sections: the “Framework and Leadership” section and 25 fact sheets. The “Framework and Leadership” section describes NASA’s history of openness and outlines our framework for approaching Open Government. This framework is based on: a perspective of continuous learning; integration of policy, technology, and culture; and the rapidly changing external environment. We believe that integrating Open Government Principles into existing systems (e.g., governance councils and performance management system) provides the best framework for success. Through this plan we establish a solid foundation for institutional change based on the five NASA Open Government principles: Increase Agency transparency and accountability to external stakeholders. Enable citizen participation in NASA’s mission. Improve internal NASA collaboration and innovation. Encourage partnerships than can create economic opportunity. Institutionalize Open Government philosophies and practices at NASA. The 25 fact sheets in this plan highlight specific activities at NASA that meet and, in many cases, exceed the requirements Open Government Directive. Three “Flagship” initiatives describe NASA’s most recent efforts and commitment that take Open Government to a new level. Each “Flagship” initiative focuses on one of the interconnected tenets of Open Government: Policy: NASA is working to make open source software development more collaborative at NASA to benefit both the Agency and the public. Technology: NASA Nebula, the U.S. government’s only cloud computing platform, offers an easier way for NASA scientists and researchers to share large, complex data sets with external partners and the public. Culture: The creation of a new NASA Participatory Exploration Office will infuse more public participation into NASA’s mission. In addition to the “Flagship” fact sheets, this plan highlights four other new initiatives that demonstrate how NASA is more open and participatory, such as NASA’s contributions to Data.gov and Open Innovation Pilots. More than half of fact sheets outline ongoing initiatives at NASA that have been in place for some time and our efforts to make them even more open and collaborative. Some fact sheets describe ongoing activities unique to NASA that showcase our history of giving the public open access to our missions such as NASA TV and opportunities for public participation and collaboration such as Education Activities and Centennial Challenges, NASA’s prize program. Other fact sheets describe areas that apply to all Agencies, such FOIA, Congressional outreach, declassification, and records management. All of the initiatives, both new and ongoing, described in this plan outline how these areas will make improvements in the Open Government principles in the short and long term. In addition to the “Flagship” fact sheets, this plan highlights four other new initiatives that demonstrate how NASA is more open and participatory, such as NASA’s contributions to Data.gov and Open Innovation Pilots. More than half of fact sheets outline ongoing initiatives at NASA that have been in place for some time and our efforts to make them even more open and collaborative. Some fact sheets describe ongoing activities unique to NASA that showcase our history of giving the public open access to our missions such as NASA TV and opportunities for public participation and collaboration such as Education Activities and Centennial Challenges, NASA’s prize program. Other fact sheets describe areas that apply to all Agencies, such FOIA, Congressional outreach, declassification, and records management. All of the initiatives, both new and ongoing, described in this plan outline how these areas will make improvements in the Open Government principles in the short and long term. The fact sheets all follow the same structure to enable easier browsing and comprehension. Each one is written by the respective initiative, project, or program giving them the opportunity to communicate what they do, how it fits into Open Government, their goals for the next two years, useful links, and two anecdotes that embody Open Government. The Web site www.nasa.gov/open/plan has the entire plan online, where each fact sheet is its own Web page. The Open Government Directive calls on NASA to do what it does best-innovate. In our history, we have achieved seemingly impossible goals, from reaching the Moon to advancing fundamental knowledge about our place in the universe. In the past we would create the technologies to achieve these goals through internal teams and collaborations. NASA must now innovate how we innovate, focusing on technologies that advance humanity into space while more directly involving citizens and public-private partnerships. The Open Government Directive also calls on us to change the way we do business, and as a result turn us into a twenty-first-century space program for a twenty-first-century democracy.

Comments From Environmental Scientist On Reducing Low-Frequency Home Noise and Vibration

Well, we seemed to have hit a nerve with our series of posts on Reducing Low-Frequency Home Noise and Vibration: https://aticourses.com/wordpress-2.7/weblog1/?p=501 https://aticourses.com/wordpress-2.7/weblog1/?p=508 https://aticourses.com/wordpress-2.7/weblog1/?p=512 https://aticourses.com/wordpress-2.7/weblog1/?p=529 The comment below came from a wonderful gentleman willing to help a fellow human being. I am an environmental scientist, and have been involved in the wind energy industry where this […]
Well, we seemed to have hit a nerve with our series of posts on Reducing Low-Frequency Home Noise and Vibration:

The comment below came from a wonderful gentleman willing to help a fellow human being.

I am an environmental scientist, and have been involved in the wind energy industry where this is also an issue. The problem is uncommon, with less than 1% of the general population able to detect LFS (Low Freq sound – less than 20 Hz) dominated by people over the age of 50, and two thirds are women. So you are not imagining the issue, but keep in mind that it is unlikely that it is your ears that are detecting the sound, and that LFS behaves very differently than audible sound does.

I find your solution to be very innovative, and supported by some excellent work by a retired Univeristy Prof (Dr Barnes) in London, England. He obtained a microphone and laptop datalogger and wandered the city obtaining background readings. One of his more interesting observations was that background LFS declined after heavy trucks passed when near high traffic roads. This suggests that LFS can be neutralized by other LFS sound.

I am no sound expert, but this is the only solution I have ever read about. It is basically the “white noise” approach used for audible sound, but in that case the goal is to increase the individuals toleration for the sound (which is how white noise works, by raising our detection threshold) but rather to distrupt and decrease the level of LFS inside your house, by increasing the levels of LFS generated inside the house.

I know this sounds a bit out there, but read a few of the other accounts given on this page, for example the one where the hum returned after a new water heater was installed. The owner blamed the new water heater as the source, but it may very well have been that the old heater was “noisy” enough to have created the interference with the LFS. Getting the new heater to run better would of course just make the problem worse.

So I put this idea out there. If you can generate a background inaudible “sound” of less than 20 Hz inside your house, using the technique described above, and play it over and over, it could disrupt the LFS being generated by the house. This could require a specialized “woofer” type of a speaker. If anyone tries this, I would be very interested in the result.

Good Luck D

Senators urge President Obama to re-evaluate his proposed cancellation of the Constellation program

U.S. Senators Mark Udall and Michael Bennet met with NASA Administrator, General Charlie Bolden, to urge President Obama to re-evaluate his proposed cancellation of the Constellation program. See some of the earlier posts below, both pro and con, by students and instructors of ATI’s Space and Satellite professional development classes and training seminars. The Senators’ […]
U.S. Senators Mark Udall and Michael Bennet met with NASA Administrator, General Charlie Bolden, to urge President Obama to re-evaluate his proposed cancellation of the Constellation program. See some of the earlier posts below, both pro and con, by students and instructors of ATI’s Space and Satellite professional development classes and training seminars.

The Senators’ letter to President Obama follows:

April 12, 2010 President Barack Obama The White House 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. NW Washington, DC 20500

Dear Mr. President: As you prepare for the April 15th conference on America’s future in space, we want to share our thoughts with you on the proposed budget for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for fiscal year 2011, as well as outline some goals for a shared vision for the future of space exploration. While there is much to like in the proposed FY11 NASA budget – including new investments in science and aeronautics research, extension of the International Space Station (ISS) through 2020, and an additional $6 billion over five years largely for development of new space exploration technology – the cancellation of the Constellation program raises many concerns. For Colorado – where the Orion capsule is being developed – this move would lead directly to the loss of over 1,000 jobs and indirectly to thousands more. More broadly, we are concerned that a reliance on unproven commercial providers for U.S. access to low Earth orbit (LEO) compromises America’s leadership position in space. It is also unclear what, if anything, will become of the significant investment in Constellation to date.

We strongly support development of commercial launch capabilities and space services. Colorado is home to many companies on the cutting edge of aerospace, two of which recently won NASA contracts to further the commercial sector’s capability to support transport of crew to and from LEO. We look forward to the day when the commercial sector can provide these services, freeing NASA to focus on development of new exploration technologies and human missions beyond LEO. However, the proposed NASA budget presumes that day is close at hand even though the commercial sector has yet to prove it can safely put a human into orbit. Should they fail to deliver, America will be reliant on Russian-procured launch services to ISS and LEO for the foreseeable future. This is an unacceptable position for the security of the nation.

The decision to terminate NASA’s development of a follow-on to the Space Shuttle has other important implications for our national security. The Department of Defense (DOD) is currently examining the impact of this decision on the U.S. space launch industrial base. We rely on this industry to sustain our strategic deterrence mission and to assure access to space through launch programs. DOD officials have stated that Constellation’s cancellation could increase the current price of propulsion systems for our launch vehicles. We understand that a DOD assessment of launch program cost impacts will not be completed until summer 2010, but it seems clear that the cancellation of Constellation will result in at least some of the costs of overhead and underutilized industry resources being passed on to DOD. As DOD does not yet fully understand the impacts on its space launch programs of cancelling Constellation, we are concerned the decision to end the Constellation program is premature.

We recognize that there are significant obstacles you must overcome with the Constellation program as it is currently configured, not the least of which is chronic under-funding. The blue-ribbon commission you convened to study options for the future of human spaceflight began its report by saying, “The U.S. human spaceflight program appears to be on an unsustainable trajectory. It is perpetuating the perilous practice of pursuing goals that do not match allocated resources.” However, we believe there is a way forward that balances stimulation of commercial service providers with the proven capabilities of NASA and its industrial partners, a way that responsibly uses limited taxpayer dollars and allows NASA to continue to serve as an inspiration to future generations of scientists, engineers, and explorers. We hope you will use the April 15th forum to describe in more detail how you plan to maintain America’s leading role in space exploration, and look forward to working with you on a NASA budget that reflects that commitment.

ATI’s Space Industry Professionals Weigh-In: Obama’s Decision to End NASA’s Constellation Program (Part 1)

Last week, Applied Technology Institute, a Space & Satellite technical training company for various NASA facilities, DoD and Aerospace contractors, surveyed their Space and Satellite clients and space industry expert instructors to find out how they feel about President Obama’s controversial decision to cut NASA’s Constellation Program. All survey participants are likely to be affected […]
Last week, Applied Technology Institute, a Space & Satellite technical training company for various NASA facilities, DoD and Aerospace contractors, surveyed their Space and Satellite clients and space industry expert instructors to find out how they feel about President Obama’s controversial decision to cut NASA’s Constellation Program. All survey participants are likely to be affected either directly or indirectly, by the shift in direction for the National and Space Administration as outlined in President Obama’s 2011 Fiscal Budget Plan. ATI’s Technical Director, Jim Jenkins says he saw an opportunity to support a healthy debate among space professionals that the public may be interested in hearing. “The Constellation controversy has been covered by varying viewpoints from different news sources, but we think people want to hear the opinions of those actually working in the space industry—those who have the technical knowledge and space industry expertise to understand how this decision may affect the space industry long-term,” he says. ATI’s survey asked the participants to weigh-in, expressing support or opposition to the President’s budget decision to cut the Constellation program in order to, “Build the Foundation for a Bold New Course for Human Space Flight, “ followed by an opportunity for them to explain their opinions as to how this change will affect NASA and manned space flight exploration. ATI’s Constellation Controversy Survey Results Summary A majority of 60% percent opposes the President’s decision to cut NASA’s Constellation Program while 32% percent expressed support. A few of the survey participants, 8% percent, are undecided. Nearly all participants explained their opinions in detail with regard to how the decision will affect NASA and manned space exploration. Explanatory comments in support of how this change will affect NASA and manned space exploration: “It is the only Obama policy I agree with. NASA needs to get out of the space business so that private industry can do something useful in space. NASA is, and has been, the major impediment to the industrialization of space. Why would someone develop a cost effective approach to space access and exploitation, when NASA spends billions to do what should cost millions (hint: look at all the progress)? If NASA made cell phones at least Apple would not be suing Google’s clients. The only thing more foolish than keeping NASA as-is would be creating a socialized health care system…oh wait… You are surveying the wrong folks. You should survey people who are trying to do something useful in space. People like Jeff Bezo, Elon Musk, Paul Allen, Richard Branson… Ask the real space industrialists and entrepreneurs what they think. I am guessing that they will tell you that NASA has held back space exploration and development for 40 years. Time to try another approach.” ______________________________________________________________________________________ “In my view, the new Obama space plan has a great potential to help the manned exploration of space. What the space program has needed all these years is an inexpensive way of handling large, manned and unmanned payloads from the surface of the earth into orbit – and beyond – at affordable rates. In short, we need “the DC-3 of space”. The approach we have been taking has not even come close to producing such a flying machine. Gain cheap access to space, lower the logistics costs, and everything else will fall into place. Come back with me to 1984. A typical GPS receiver of that era, the Texas Instruments 4100, cost $139,000 and we spent about $4000 to send one pound of payload into space using an expendable American booster. Now fast-forward to 2010: GPS receivers are so cheap (about $100 each), we give them away in my classes! And how much does it cost today to send one pound of payload into space with an expendable American booster? Around $6000 per pound! In that same 26 year interval almost every available high-technology product has either become enormously cheaper or far more capable. Why not booster rockets? So, should we just keep doing what we have been doing along the space frontier? Or worse yet, go back to reusing booster rockets that were developed 20 or 30 years ago? Surely we can do better! Maybe more free enterprise is the answer. What should NASA be focusing on? Cheaper ways to put large payloads into space. Are robotics missions a better approach? Sometimes. We keep about 2000 human beings in Antarctica year around and several thousand more in the summer months. Would it be more cost-effective to replace them with robots and teleoperators? Per unit of useful work, would it be cheaper? Maybe. Do we want to make that replacement? I don’t think so. In 1969 in my first book, I wrote about the funerals in which elderly Italian mourners were hired to wail and moan. As I asked at that time: “Wouldn’t it be cheaper to develop spring-wound mechanical mourners? Maybe so. But isn’t human presence somehow, in some cases, more special. If not, why does anyone ever go to a football game now that we have such excellent television coverage? Why do we go on vacation for that matter? Wouldn’t it be cheaper to stay home and watch travelogues?“ _______________________________________________________________________________________ “Yes, but only if something is done to continue manned U. S. presence in space. What he did does nothing but kill the U. S. manned space program and force the U. S. to rely on foreign governments for several years to come.” ________________________________________________________________________________________ “YES, but we should continue flying Shuttle until we have a demonstrated replacement capability operating. We should not look to other countries for our space taxi service. YES, I support decision to terminate Constellation program, but because it is not affordable and sustainable while performing any real exploration, e.g. spending all of our resources on the transportation system like we were in Apollo. This is the reason we terminated the Apollo Lunar program so that we could develop a reusable space transportation system that would bring down the cost of transportation. The Shuttle reduced the cost to ~ 1/3 of the cost using the expendable approach. We need to continue to develop and improve the reusable transportation system architecture to achieve this objective before we start considering a trip back to the moon or to mars. The shuttle cost reduction did not fully achieve the cost goal; however, we did not place any hard requirements on Life Cycle Cost controls during the DDT&E phase with a continuing cost reduction improvement objective.” ________________________________________________________________________________________ “Yes, I support the new plan for NASA. Newer technologies are clearly beneficial and the constellation was unsustainable.” ________________________________________________________________________________________ “The good news for sure is an increase of $6 billion over the next five years. It stresses new technology and innovation (to the tune of over $1.5 billion), which is also good. A lot of NASA’s successes have been from pushing the limits on what can be done. It also stresses Earth science, which isn’t surprising at all; Obama appears to understand the importance of our environmental impact, including global warming. So that’s still good news” ________________________________________________________________________________________ “We need to move beyond the shuttle. Specifically we should invest in a reusable first stage booster build using SOTA technology.” ________________________________________________________________________________________ “It help NASA determine their future course of action. Create jobs and advance our knowledge of Space.” “Yes. Constellation was unsustainable without a major funding increase, which was not going to happen in this economic climate. Success in the new program is better than failure in Constellation.” ________________________________________________________________________________________ “Yes. It was stupid for NASA to have agreed to the previous administration’s request to go to Mars with a hugely expensive detour to the Moon, particularly with inadequate funding. Why not just purchase some Russian Soyuz capsules and rockets? The Russian system is reliable and not that expensive. And whether Constellation is cancelled or not probably won’t matter. I don’t think that many Americans give a crap about the space program anymore, and fewer still are interested in science research. People are too busy with Hollywood celebrities and sports figures, cable TV, etc.” ________________________________________________________________________________________ ATI encourages further participation from both the public and private sectors to continue this important and controversial debate. ATI is planning a follow-up poll after the President’s April 15th conference on NASA’s future where he will outline his strategy for the next step in space exploration. Jenkins says, “It will be interesting to see if any opinions shift after the President details his strategy for the future of space, since those details have yet to be presented beyond his 2011 Fiscal Budget Plan.” The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) specializes in professional development seminars in the technical areas of space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. For over twenty-five years, ATI has presented leading-edge technical training to defense and NASA facilities, as well as DoD and aerospace contractors. ATI courses provide a clear understanding of the fundamental principles and a working knowledge of current technology and applications. ATI has the unique capability to schedule and deliver courses in a matter of weeks. They offer customized on-site training at your facility anywhere in the United States, as well as internationally and over 200 annual public courses in dozens of locations. World-class design experts lead courses. To register or for an on-site quote, call (888) 501-2100, or visit them on the web at www.ATIcourses.com To comment: Scroll to the bottom of the post and click ‘comment’. To post anonymously, use “guest” or “anon” in the name field. Your e-mail will not appear on the blog. Please click here for Part 2 or Part 3 of this post.

“Green” Peace and Quiet: new noise source (the light rail train) in Seattle

Light Rail has arrived in Seattle. The first link, a 14-mile electric railway system, opened in July 2009, making access from South Seattle to the downtown core, easier and more efficient. The ability of a light rail system to run along streets and share space with road traffic makes it an ideal choice for an […]
Light Rail has arrived in Seattle. The first link, a 14-mile electric railway system, opened in July 2009, making access from South Seattle to the downtown core, easier and more efficient. The ability of a light rail system to run along streets and share space with road traffic makes it an ideal choice for an urban setting. Seattle’s new light rail operates on embedded tracks at street level, along elevated structures and through tunnels. This study focused on the street level segment and the potential increase in noise levels for residents along the alignment. In order to accommodate the light rail, an arterial through Seattle’s Rainier Valley neighborhood was widened to allow the trains to travel down the center of the roadway. Not only did this introduce a new noise source (the light rail train) into the community, it also slightly increased existing traffic noise as the widening of the street relocated traffic nearer to the homes. Figure 1 shows the configuration of rail and traffic and the proximity to residences.
Figure 1. The light rail travels down the center of the road Studies were conducted to predict the level of increased noise for homes along the alignment. The metric used to define the light rail noise was the Day-Night Level (Ldn). This metric is based upon a 24-hour average of sound with a penalty added to any sounds occurring between the hours of 10:00 PM and 7:00 AM. The penalty is intended to reflect a higher sensitivity to noise during typical sleeping hours. The traffic noise metric was based upon an hourly Equivalent Level (Leq), which is the average sound in a one-hour period. The loudest hour is used to assess impact. The initial program included 137 residences, with predicted exterior sound levels due to the project, that were high enough to be considered “impacted”. Sound Transit, the local Transit Authority, received a grant from the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) to launch a Residential Sound Insulation Program (RSIP), designed to reduce transportation noise intrusion into homes. Each home received an acoustical audit to measure the level of sound insulation provided by the existing construction. Figures 2 and 3 demonstrate two approaches to measuring the sound insulation properties of window elements.
Masurement approach #1


Masurement approach #2

Read more here

Where Would You Go for a UAS Course in the Washington, DC Area? Washington, DC Monday, March 29, 2010

Where Would You Go for a UAS Course in the Washington, DC Area?
Where Would You Go for a UAS Course in the Washington, DC Area?

New Technology Training so YOU Can Gain Knowledge about this Growing Field. Can you picture yourself as an office stand-out in Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS)? Wouldn’t you like to gain first-hand knowledge of their capabilities? Or be an expert in this exciting field of technology? UAS applications are growing and now include agriculture, communications relays, aerial photography, mapping, emergency management, scientific research, environmental management, and law enforcement. In fact, the Teal Group’s 2009 market study estimates that UAV spending will almost double over the next decade, from current worldwide UAV expenditures of $4.4 billion annually, to $8.7 billion within a decade. They are coming to an airspace near you. Our one day short course is designed for busy engineers, aviation experts and project managers who wish to enhance their understanding of UAS without missing much time from work. You will receive technical training and practical knowledge to recognize the different classes and types of unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAV). You will not only learn to interact meaningfully with your colleagues but also master the terminology of today’s complex systems. Course Outline, Samplers and Notes The complete course includes the following information and more: • History and development of UAS • Characteristics of the Raven, Shadow, Scan Eagle, Predator and Global Hawk • Descriptions of various UAV sensor payloads (EO/IR, Radar and SAR) • UAS Gaining Access to the National Airspace System (NAS) • UAV videos, see them in the air and in action But don’t take our word for it; see for yourself the value of our courses before attending. Check out our samples (See Slide Samples) of the course materials. After attending the course you will receive a full set of detailed notes from the class for future reference, as well as a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more free and valuable information. About ATI The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) specializes in short course technical training in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. Since 1984, ATI has provided leading-edge public courses and on-site technical training to defense and NASA facilities, as well as DOD and aerospace contractors. About the Instructor Mr. Mark N. Lewellen has over twenty-five years of engineering experience and is co-founder of RMT Spectrum Associates, Inc. He has successfully advocated technical and regulatory solutions as a member of formal US delegations at over forty international meetings. More recently, he has added UAS to his field of expertise. Date, Time and Location ATI proudly announces the next presentation of his new UAS class at 8:30am on June 15th, 2009 in Beltsville, MD. Sincerely, The ATI Courses Team P.S. For registration: Call today at 410-956-8805 or 888-501-2100 or go online now at www.aticourses.com

More Information On Reducing Low-Frequency Home Noise and Vibration –

We received a question from a consumer regarding low-frequency home and vibration. After a response from expert staff of Acoustics and Noise instructors and a few additional posts on this general topic of interest, the response below came from the original consumer. Dear Sir, Here is my reply. You asked for it, and it is […]
We received a question from a consumer regarding low-frequency home and vibration. After a response from expert staff of Acoustics and Noise instructors and a few additional posts on this general topic of interest, the response below came from the original consumer.

Dear Sir, Here is my reply. You asked for it, and it is lengthy. I am so grateful that you all are taking your time to give me your suggestions. I think a probable low frequency noise source, in addition to the trains, and obvious manufacturers’ noises, could be an asphalt batch plant that is located just behind our neighborhood. I drove by and listened and it is quite noisy with its clattering conveyer belts, giant blower, and the huge rotating mixing bin. I doubt we could have any influence on quieting such an operation. When we moved into our present house this plant was hidden by trees. Now that the leaves are gone, it is easily seen. Let the renter beware! We have tried all the things that were suggested in your e-mail. White noise machines and fans just added noise to the home and was not the solution I needed. The best brand of ear plugs worked well, but are kind of dangerous when you need to listen to what is going on in the house at night….like when someone might be sick and need help. ( mothers can appreciate this reason), or a tornado siren, etc. My husband must sleep and so I have the “night watch”. .The Bose headphones (thanks Grandma) did not do a thing for the low frequency, but one of my sons is enjoying them tremendously now for listening to music. I hate that she wasted so much money on something that didn’t work. I, too, have wasted lots of money buying several bundles of Fibrex to use as “bass traps” of sorts thinking that it might help. It did not. We did the realtor thing also. We moved from our first house recently. That house has its own story. We had moved to this town from out of state and did not know much about the area. Well, the house we bought was down the street from a gas well compressor. It was hidden in a wooded area and we did not know about it. Who would ever think that such a thing as a gas well compressor would be in a neighborhood…..only in Texas. The days we viewed the house happened to be some of the few days a year that the compressor was down for repairs or maintenance. On closing day when I walked up the stairs to turn the key in the door, I said to my self, “What is that noise.” After searching the neighborhood, we discovered the culprit to be a very old noisy natural gas driven compressor on a gas well. I fought that oil company for a long time and only was successful getting them to put up a wooden fence that did absolutely no good. Oil companies are King around here. They always expressed to me that they were compliant. They were, but this city has wimpy standards and codes that do not measure low frequency. We had spent lots of time, sweat, tears and money fixing up “this old house” and we did not want to move. We had redone the wooden floors ourselves, and I did not want to cover them up with carpet, even though that might have helped with the sound. We couldn’t afford to change out the old windows that were huge and had just been refurbished by me. Our home was built in an L shape facing the compressor. This was perfect for capturing the “waves”. They came right in through our large glass windows. In addition to that, there were metal awnings over each window acting like ears to reflect the sound in through the single pane windows. (I had refurbished those as well) The neighborhood was refreshingly quiet on the few days that “The Beast” was off for one reason or another. After three years of torment, the for sale sign went up. We disclosed the noise ( which probably brought our home value down) to the new buyer. She was not home much of the time anyway so she was not as bothered by it. The search for a quieter place was on. We were scared to think of buying again without knowing if “the sound” would be in that area too. , “ I had gone to look at houses for sale, just to see if I could hear how the house “sounded” and just to “test” a neighborhood. We decided just to rent. Little did we know that rental homes that are large enough for our family of six and that are in our price range are extremely hard to find in our town. We ended up having to grab a house when it became available just to get a decent place to live. As it turns out, we ended up moving from one frying pan to another frying pan so to speak. We have now been living in this rental for ten months and we are still plagued with noise problems. I say we because even though the others of our household are not as sensitive to LFN as I am, they still have to live with someone (the mom) who is and whose daily life is not as efficient as it could be were I able to sufficiently rest and relax. I went with our church on a mission trip to Mexico a couple of years ago. While up in a quiet mountain village, I discovered how wonderful peace and quiet were, and I realized just how much that LFN affected me while living in our bombarded home. Since we now rent, I can’t beef up the windows, but I have heard that double panes do not help with low frequency anyway. I’ll try to make a window plug to see if that helps. I can’t run the TV “off channel” because we need to concentrate and study at home. We are one of those homeschooling families. Also, that noise is annoying to my teenage daughter and me. You asked about whether or not other neighbors have had the same problems as I. I can’t tell you that. We haven’t gotten to know our neighbors very well yet. There are some factors to remember when questioning the neighbors about noise problems. Many in our neighborhood are retired and wearing hearing aids. They, of course, do not have problems with the noise. Second, if they did hear the offending frequency, they would be hesitant to say so in fear that this information might be something that could “go public” and cause their home values to go down. Third, low frequency noise is most often a source of annoyance to those fifty and older (I give away my age). The younger ones in the neighborhood have not yet reached that point. On a side note, there is an old man in the neighborhood who sits out in his attached garage with the garage door up for many hours a day. He will even sit out there when it is 100 degrees outside. I am just curious if he has a problem with LFN and is trying to escape it as I am. By the way, when I am out working in my ten by twelve foot shed (made of that composite siding stuff and sitting on wooden skids) I can’t hear or feel the vibration. This makes me wonder if the noise could be possibly ground borne. The LFN does seem to be worse when it is raining…..hum….saturated soil conducts noise very well doesn’t it. If the LFN was ground borne, would ….putting down a wood or laminate flooring that had a good coating of Green Glue behind it help. Is there any conclusive way to determine if LFN is indeed coming through a concrete slab? (I know this is some of that thousands of dollars of advice coming my way.) As was suggested, I am going to try to decouple the bed from the floor. I’ll order some sheets of sorbothane for that purpose. They are supposed to work better than rubber. What kind of instrument would measure the wall or slab vibrations? My son, who is now an engineering major (ME), once measured the sound with a microphone on his computer. Using music recording software, he measured the frequencies from 30 to 60htz or so. He had fun isolating the sound and turning it way up for all to hear and feel till we yelled at him to shut it off….ah teens. He captured it in the tile shower. So I know it is “out there” and not just “in my head”. It could be that I am one of those “hummers”. Read about them online. They can hear the Kokomo Hum, the Taos Hum, the London Hum, etc. There is even a low frequency sufferer’s society. This is your market for whoever invents a comfortable low frequency blocking head gear that can be worn at night. This wouldn’t block (as ear plugs do) the types of noise that parent’s need to hear at night. I would be interested in any tests like the one that one of the teacher’s mentioned ….measuring the frequency outdoors and comparing it to the indoor reading. I guess I just have to rent a device that measures what I need to measure. We would like to move, but as I said previously, I would not like to buy a home without knowing that I can block the offending noise that this town seems to produce whether from trains, underground gas pipes, well drilling, or chemical and manufacturing industries, etc. If we were to rent, we could not spend lots of money to “treat” the house for LFN. My husband likes his job and would like to stay in the area if possible. Me, I’d rather move to a small mountain village in Mexico. Or until then, I’ll just sleep with a pair of sorbothane shoe insoles smashed over my ears. I am glad you are teaching classes to train engineers in ways of mitigating noise and vibration, because ultimately these problems have a personal side and a personal face. If I have been a “textbook” case for you then so be it, and may you all become the best problem solvers in this area. If any of you have any other suggestions for me, send them my way. If you solve my problem, then my hat is (or should I say ear plugs are) off to you. Please do not share my e-mail address with the masses. My humble thanks, C

ATI To Introduce Custom Mugs and T-Shirts

Here at ATI we have a healthy sense of humor and enjoy a good laugh! This is how we came up with a personalized humor mug/t-shirt idea. Each product will have a work-related cool image, modified to show our students in the image performing the work. Please help us choose the best tag lines or […]

Here at ATI we have a healthy sense of humor and enjoy a good laugh! This is how we came up with a personalized humor mug/t-shirt idea. Each product will have a work-related cool image, modified to show our students in the image performing the work.

Please help us choose the best tag lines or propose some new ones. Here is what we came up with so far.

  • Trained Rocket Scientist ( with face inserted into Astronaut image)
  • In-Depth Expert (with submarine image with face inserted into the Commanding Officer image)
  • I Know What I am Doing ( with face inserted into image of Radar/CIC officer group
  • Satellites are not over my head (artwork of satellite and earthstation)
  • I know how to dish it out (artwork of earthstation)
  • Orbital Mechanic (artwork of a wrench and a satellite
  • What Part of C/N = EIRP+G/T-SL-BW-AL-OL+228.6 don’t you understand (maybe followed by “I do”) (artwork of dish, lightning-like link, satellite)
  • Unmanned Aircraft System Specialist
  • UAS: My Other Vehicle is Unmanned
  • Satellite Saints Fly Higher
  • RF Engineers: Equal to [or Calculate at] the Speed of Light
  • Project Manager Maven
  • Radar Raven
  • Sonar Swami
  • EM Experts: Attract with a Spark
  • SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) Engineers are Illuminating
  • Network Engineers are VERY Connected
  • Systems Engineers: Know Where All the Pieces Go
  • Autopilot Engineers Know Where to Go
  • Earth Station Designers are Very Grounded
  • Submarine Experts: Keeping Their Head Below Water
  • Vibration and Noise Control Experts Shake It In Silence
  • Remote Sensor Expert: Long Distance Voyeurs
  • Fiber Optic Experts Love a Good Piece of Glass
  • Grounding Guru
  • Trained Rocket Scientist (with face inserted into Astronaut image)
  • In-Depth Expert (with submarine image with face inserted into the Commanding Officer image)
  • I Know What I am Doing ( with face inserted into image of Radar/CIC officer group
Please email you suggestions to us!

See more ATI humor here!

Space Shuttle Launch Photo

This picture was taken by James Vernacotola. It was taken in Ponte Vedra from the top of the 210 bridge crossing the intracoastal looking south towards St, Augustine and Cape Canaveral. He got up very early and took this picture of the last nighttime space shuttle launch and was kind enough to share with his […]

    This picture was taken by James Vernacotola. It was taken in Ponte Vedra from the top of the 210 bridge crossing the intracoastal looking south towards St, Augustine and Cape Canaveral. He got up very early and took this picture of the last nighttime space shuttle launch and was kind enough to share with his co-workers and whomever else would appreciate the beauty of the space launch. He took the picture using a tri-pod and the elapsed time for the picture was several minutes in order to get the full fire-trail (this is why the stars are little lines instead of dots).

    Monday, February 8, 2010 @ 4:14 am
    Top of the Intracoastal Waterway Bridge in Ponte Vedra, FL
    115 Miles from the launch
    34 Degrees outside!

ATI Introduces Hyperspectral and Multispectral Imaging Techical White Papers by Dr. Richard Gomez

Dr. Gomez is the presenter of ATI’s Hyperspectral and Multispectral Imaging course scheduled to be presented on March 9-11, 2010 in Beltsville, MD. This three-day class is designed for engineers, scientists and other remote sensing professionals who wish to become familiar with multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing technology. Students in this course will learn the […]
Dr. Gomez is the presenter of ATI’s Hyperspectral and Multispectral Imaging course scheduled to be presented on March 9-11, 2010 in Beltsville, MD. This three-day class is designed for engineers, scientists and other remote sensing professionals who wish to become familiar with multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing technology. Students in this course will learn the basic physics of spectroscopy, the types of spectral sensors currently used by government and industry, and the types of data processing used for various applications. Lectures will beenhanced by computer demonstrations. After taking this course, students should be able to communicate and work productively with other professionals in this field. Each student will receive a complete set of notes and the textbook, Remote Sensing: The Image Chain Approach. View course sampler Dr. Richard Gomez is a Research Professor at George Mason University (GMU) and Principal Research Scientist at the Center for Earth Observing and Space Research (CEOSR). At GMU he teaches and is actively involved in the scientific and technology fields of hyperspectral imaging and high resolution remote sensing. He has also served in industry and government (Texas Instruments and USACE). Dr. Gomez is internationally recognized as a leader and expert in the field of spectral remote sensing (multispectral, hyperspectral and ultraspectral) and has published extensively in scientific journals. He has organized and chaired national and international conferences, symposia and workshops. He earned his doctoral degree in physics from New Mexico State University. He also holds an M.S. and a B.S. in physics. Dr. Gomez currently serves as Director for the ASPRS Potomac Region and as Remote Sensing Chair for the IEEE-USA Committee on Transportation and Aerospace Technology Policy.

Unmanned Aircraft- Pentagon budget Calls For More!

U.S. Defense officials outlined plans to double production of unmanned aircraft, part of an expanded 2011 budget unveiled Monday. The budget will grow 7.1% to $708 billion in 2011. The Pentagon is one of the few U.S. agencies, mostly dealing with national security, that were cleared to receive budget increases under a spending freeze ordered […]
U.S. Defense officials outlined plans to double production of unmanned aircraft, part of an expanded 2011 budget unveiled Monday. The budget will grow 7.1% to $708 billion in 2011. The Pentagon is one of the few U.S. agencies, mostly dealing with national security, that were cleared to receive budget increases under a spending freeze ordered by President Obama. Underscoring the Pentagon’s focus on unmanned aircraft in its 2011 budget, the Air Force for the first time is proposing the acquisition of more unmanned aircraft than combat aircraft. The Air Force will double its production of the MQ-9 Reaper, a bigger, more heavily armed version of the Predator drone, to 48. The Army will also buy 26 extended-range Predators. Overall, spending on the Reapers and Predators, which are built by General Atomics of San Diego, will grow from $877.5 million in 2010 to $1.4 billion in 2011. The expansion will allow the military to increase unmanned patrols — the number of planes in the air at once — to 65, up from its current limit of 37. Besides their use in international hot spots, Gates said, drones are useful for such efforts as countering narcotics trafficking and helping in natural disasters. “We will continue to see significant growth for some years into the future even as the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan eventually wind down,” Gates said. “The more we have used them, the more we have identified their potential in a broader and broader set of circumstances.” Read the full article here.

ATI Courses Humour Page – Laugh With Us!

Here, at ATI, we ejoy a good laugh. That is why we indroduced our ATI Humor Page to cheer our readers up! Here are a few choice jokes you can find on our humor page Why Engineers Don’t Write Recipe Books Chocolate Chip Cookies: Ingredients: 1.) 532.35 cm3 gluten 2.) 4.9 cm3 NaHCO3 3.) 4.9 […]
Here, at ATI, we ejoy a good laugh. That is why we indroduced our ATI Humor Page to cheer our readers up!

Here are a few choice jokes you can find on our humor page

Why Engineers Don’t Write Recipe Books Chocolate Chip Cookies: Ingredients: 1.) 532.35 cm3 gluten 2.) 4.9 cm3 NaHCO3 3.) 4.9 cm3 refined halite 4.) 236.6 cm3 partially hydrogenated tallow triglyceride 5.) 177.45 cm3 crystalline C12H22O11 6.) 177.45 cm3 unrefined C12H22O11 7.) 4.9 cm3 methyl ether of protocatechuic aldehyde 8.) Two calcium carbonate-encapsulated avian albumen-coated protein 9.) 473.2 cm3 theobroma cacao 10.) 236.6 cm3 de-encapsulated legume meats (sieve size #10) To a 2-L jacketed round reactor vessel (reactor #1) with an overall heat transfer coefficient of about 100 Btu/F-ft2-hr, add ingredients one, two and three with constant agitation. In a second 2-L reactor vessel with a radial flow impeller operating at 100 rpm, add ingredients four, five, six, and seven until the mixture is homogenous. To reactor #2, add ingredient eight, followed by three equal volumes of the homogenous mixture in reactor #1. Additionally, add ingredient nine and ten slowly, with constant agitation. Care must be taken at this point in the reaction to control any temperature rise that may be the result of an exothermic reaction. Using a screw extrude attached to a #4 nodulizer, place the mixture piece-meal on a 316SS sheet (300 x 600 mm). Heat in a 460K oven for a period of time that is in agreement with Frank & Johnston’s first order rate expression (see JACOS, 21, 55), or until golden brown. Once the reaction is complete, place the sheet on a 25C heat-transfer table, allowing the product to come to equilibrium.

Human Anatomy Three engineering students were gathered together discussing the possible designers of the human body. One said, “It was a mechanical engineer. Just look at all the joints.” Another said, “No, it was an electrical engineer. The nervous system has many thousands of electrical connections.” The last said, “Actually it was a civil engineer. Who else would run a toxic waste pipeline through a recreational area?”

Five Surgeons Five surgeons were taking a coffee break and were discussing their work. The first said, “I think accountants are the easiest to operate on. You open them up and everything inside is numbered.” The second said, “I think librarians are the easiest to operate on. You open them up and everything inside is in alphabetical order.” The Third said, “I like to operate on electricians. You open them up and everything inside is color-coded.” The fourth one said, “I like to operate on lawyers. They’re heartless, spineless, gutless, and their heads and their butts are interchangeable.” Fifth surgeon said, “I like Engineers…they always understand when you have a few parts left over at the end…”

If you enoyed the above, please read on…