Spread The News

In radio communications, spread spectrum techniques are methods by which a signal generated with a particular bandwidth is spread in the frequency domain, resulting in a signal with a wider bandwidth.  So, why would a radio communications engineer want to do this?  There are actually many advantages to employing spread spectrum in your design.  I […]

In radio communications, spread spectrum techniques are methods by which a signal generated with a particular bandwidth is spread in the frequency domain, resulting in a signal with a wider bandwidth.  So, why would a radio communications engineer want to do this?  There are actually many advantages to employing spread spectrum in your design.  I will not even attempt to explain spread spectrum techniques in this blog, but if you want to learn more about these techniques, ATI can help.  So, what are the advantages, you ask?

Crosstalk interference is greatly attenuated due to the processing gain of the spread spectrum system.

Voice quality is improved due to less static noise.

Lower susceptibility to multipath fading.

Increased security since a PN sequence is used to either modulate the signal in the time domain, or select the carrier frequency.

More users can Coexist in the same frequency band

Longer operating distances since higher transmit power is allowed.

Signal is harder to detect by those who are not supposed to be detecting it.

Signal is harder to jam.

If these advantages sound like something you would like to achieve, consider learning more about Spread Spectrum techniques in radio communications by taking the ATI short course titled Wireless Communications and Spread Spectrum Design.  You can learn more about this course, and register for it here on the ATI Web Page. 

And as always, a complete list of ATI courses, and a schedule of upcoming offerings can be found here on the ATI home page.

ATI Will Be Giving You The Business in 2022

Historically, Applied Technology Institute has delivered technical courses to scientists and engineers to help them keep current in their fields.  As stated in our mission statement, we have offered courses in satellite communications, space, defense, radar, sonar and acoustics, signal processing, and systems engineering.  Although we plan to continue doing exactly that in 2022, we […]

Historically, Applied Technology Institute has delivered technical courses to scientists and engineers to help them keep current in their fields.  As stated in our mission statement, we have offered courses in satellite communications, space, defense, radar, sonar and acoustics, signal processing, and systems engineering.  Although we plan to continue doing exactly that in 2022, we are also going to be offering some new courses that will be unlike what we have offered before. 

As reported in the Harvard Business School’s Business Insights Blog, “To stay competitive in the job market, aspiring engineers and those who want to advance need a strong, diverse set of skills.”  The article continues saying “To meet job demand, it’s important they round out their experience and add important business basics to their skill set.”  And, “As engineers advance to senior positions, they acquire responsibilities like managing teams, projects, and budgets. To reach those positions and perform their duties effectively, they need to have a strong set of business skills.”  This article states precisely why ATI has decided to start offering courses to help scientists and engineers supplement the technical skills in their toolbox with other critical skills for success in today’s world.

The HBS Blog identifies seven areas that should be addressed in an engineer’s business training; Communication, Management, Creativity, Finance, Observation, Negotiation, and Ethics.  ATI will begin by offering two courses related to this discussion in 2022. 

The first course introduces many of the topics mentioned by the HBS Blog.  The course will be “Business Management for Engineers” taught by Dr. Alan Tribble, author of the book by the same title.  As stated by Dr. Tribble, “This two-day course is intended to accelerate professional growth by helping individuals with a technical background develop an appreciation for, and understanding of, the types of business knowledge used by senior leadership.”  A full description, as well as the schedule for upcoming offerings of this course can be found here on the ATI web page.

The second course will be more focused on one of the skills highlighted in the HBS blog.  The course will be “Technical Presentation Skills for STEM Professionals”, taught by Lt Col, USAF (Ret) Frank DiBartolomeo, Jr, author of the book “Speak Well and Prosper”.  As stated by Frank, This two-day course for scientists, technologists, engineers and mathematicians (STEM) covers all the basics of sound technical presentation preparation and delivery.”  A full description, as well as the schedule for upcoming offerings of this course can be found here on the ATI web page.  This course will also be the subject of a free short session overview which is scheduled to occur in the lead up to the class.

Again, ATI will continue to offer the technical courses you have come to expect from us, but we are excited about these new courses that will give scientists and engineers the ability to broaden their horizons even more.  Please check back soon for additional business-related courses, and as always, please let us know if there are business topics you would like us to focus on next.

These Probes are Out of This World

As I stare into the night sky, I sometimes find myself thinking about how vast the universe is.  Sometimes, while thinking about where space ends, or the fact that space never ends, I start to feel very uneasy.  Regardless, I will blog about it, but I am not happy about it. There are currently only […]

As I stare into the night sky, I sometimes find myself thinking about how vast the universe is.  Sometimes, while thinking about where space ends, or the fact that space never ends, I start to feel very uneasy.  Regardless, I will blog about it, but I am not happy about it.

There are currently only 5 Planetary Probes which have left the solar system, and are continuing on their path to the infinite unknown.  Each of these probes were launched into interstellar space by a multistage rocket, and the final stage of each rocket is also on a similar path to the unknown, but these rocket parts are merely space junk now, and we will not discuss those here.

Pioneer 10 was the first Planetary Probe launched in 1972.  We have not had contact with Pioneer 10 since 2003, but before loosing contact, we saw it pass Jupiter, and it is now presumably heading toward a star in the constellation of Taurus.

Pioneer 11 was launched the following year in 1973.  We have not had contact with Pioneer 11 since 1995, but before loosing contact, we saw it pass Jupiter, and Saturn.  Pioneer 11 will arrive at its target in the constellation of Sagittarius in 4 million years.

Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 were both launched in 1977.  They both remain active and send data to earth.  They left the solar system in 2012 and 2018, respectively. 

The last Planetary Probe to leave the Solar System was New Horizons, launched in 2006.  New Horizons remained active as it passed Pluto and returned imagery in 2015.  New Horizons still remains active and is continues sending scientific data to earth.

It is truly remarkable that mankind has sent probes so far into space, and even more amazing that some of these probes are still returning data to earth. 

These feats would not have been possible without exceptional rockets, and exceptional rocket scientists.

To learn more about Rocket Propulsion, or to sharpen your skills as a Rocket Scientist, consider taking one of ATI’s upcoming courses on the topic.

Both Rocket Propulsion 101 and Rockets and Launch Vehicles – Selection and Design will be offered in February, 2022.

As always, a full listing of ATI courses can be found here.

Real Life Sometimes Imitates Fiction

Although 2021 has not been such a bad year so far, after a year like 2020, we sometimes ask ourselves … “what else could possibly go wrong?”  Thanks to movies like Armageddon, Don’t Look Up, Deep Impact, Ice Age, and others, we can again sleep restlessly knowing that Earth could be annihilated at any moment […]

Although 2021 has not been such a bad year so far, after a year like 2020, we sometimes ask ourselves … “what else could possibly go wrong?”  Thanks to movies like Armageddon, Don’t Look Up, Deep Impact, Ice Age, and others, we can again sleep restlessly knowing that Earth could be annihilated at any moment by an asteroid impact.  Although an asteroid impact is often thought of as science fiction, it is something that can actually happen.  In fact, many believe that the extinction of dinosaurs was the result of an ancient asteroid impact.  Although it is not something that we ever expect to see in our lifetime, the possibility of an impact in the distant future cannot be ruled out.  Consequently, scientists are already thinking about what we would do if we were ever faced with that scenario for real.     

So, what’s the first step?

The Double Asteroid Redirection Test ( DART ) Mission is being developed and lead for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.  A full description of the Mission can be found here.  The DART mission is NASA’s demonstration of kinetic impactor technology impacting an asteroid to adjust its speed and path.  Mission literature goes to extreme lengths to assure the public that this particular asteroid is NOT on a path to earth, and that this impact will not cause the asteroid to take aim on earth.  It is simply a demonstration of our ability to take action in the event that earth is ever threatened.     

DART arrives at the asteroid in October of 2022.  I am sure we will hear more about the Mission at that time, and we will devote another blog to DART at that time also.

A mission like this involves so many of the skills that are taught in ATI’s courses related to Space and Systems Engineering.  Please take a look at our courses here, and see what courses may be helpful to you and your team, so that you can be a contributor in future space missions that have such a huge impact, no pun intended.

Tis The Season

Although most ATI blogs are written for the benefit of students or prospective students, this one is written for the benefit of instructors or prospective instructors.  It should be of interest to students as well as instructors though, as students want to know about their instructors, and even more importantly, today’s student may become tomorrow’s […]

Although most ATI blogs are written for the benefit of students or prospective students, this one is written for the benefit of instructors or prospective instructors.  It should be of interest to students as well as instructors though, as students want to know about their instructors, and even more importantly, today’s student may become tomorrow’s instructor.

As anyone who reads the news knows, many companies are having trouble finding qualified and motivated people to work for them.  Although ATI is blessed with a large cadre of great instructors, we are always looking for new blood, and it can be difficult at times to find new instructors, particularly during holiday seasons when people have more important things to worry about.

So, I was meditating last night, thinking about the attributes that I normally associate with a good instructor, or that I normally look for in a person that we may want to hire as an instructor.  If we can come up with list of those attributes, then we simply need to find a person that has all of those attributes, and hire that person.  Sounds simple.  So, let’s talk about attributes.

First, the person needs to be a Subject Matter Expert on Rocket Science.  Based on one of our current needs, SMEs in Aerodynamic Propulsion and GPS would be very desirable.

Second, the person needs to be highly organized and a very hard worker, for obvious reasons.  The instructor should realize that the demand for classes is not always the same, so there may be very busy times of the year, and there may be slow times.

Third, the person has to like students, and he must enjoy working with students.

Fourth, the person should be mature, with lots of experience, and a demonstrated ability to do his job year after year.

Fifth, the person has to be willing to do some marketing, and help ATI talk to prospective students during the run-up to the course, and maybe even talk to students during our free sessions.

Sixth, the person might live locally in the Baltimore/Washington area, but that is not a hard requirement.  The person can live in very remote location and he can travel as required to meet with students.

With this list in mind, I went to our Data base of a three zillion prospective instructors, and I found a single person that has every one of our desired attributes.  So, let me describe this person named Nick.  For confidentiality reasons, I will not share his last name.  I will talk a little about how he demonstrates each of the attributes.

Nick is an expert in Aerial Ship Design and Operations, in fact, he drives his Ship around annually, and relies on GPS to make a huge number of stops.  Nick is very organized and a hard worker, as demonstrated by the huge number of stops associated with the annual trip that he makes in his Air Ship.  Nick loves working with kids and students and enjoys making them happy.  Nick usually spends the month leading up to his annual trip meeting with kids that he plans to visit on the night of his trip.  At these pre-trip meetings, he and the kids often discuss goals and expectations, so Nick can be better prepared for the start of his trip.  Lastly, although Nick lives in a very remote place, he is very willing to travel great distances, and he has demonstrated that year after year, for so many years.

I tried to contact Nick and see if we can get him to teach for us, but his voice mail indicated that he was too busy to talk to me, but that I should call him back after Christmas when his schedule will be much lighter.  I did not want to wait that long to talk to him, so I decided to visit him, but was unable to find any good deals on flights to his home at the North Pole.

Please take a look at our schedule of upcoming classes here.  Although you will not see Nick’s classes listed yet, please check back often after the holidays to see if we were successful hiring him.

On a serious note, ATI really is always looking for new instructors.  If you think you would like to teach for us, please let us know, so we can talk more about it.

ATI wishes everyone a very happy upcoming holiday season.  We are always here to help you, even during this very busy holiday season.  

Field Testing Can Be A Blast

As discussed in a recent ATI Blog, Model Based Systems Engineering is a great way to accomplish goals cheaper, faster, and better.  MBSE alleviates the need to verify your design and construction with frequent and expensive field testing.  Unfortunately, however, there is still a need to occasionally conduct field testing.  Field testing may be required […]

As discussed in a recent ATI Blog, Model Based Systems Engineering is a great way to accomplish goals cheaper, faster, and better.  MBSE alleviates the need to verify your design and construction with frequent and expensive field testing.  Unfortunately, however, there is still a need to occasionally conduct field testing.  Field testing may be required to verify the validity of models which feed your MBSE. Additionally, it is sometimes critically important to conduct field tests, even though Models suggest that the system will work as designed.  One example of this would be when human lives are at stake, and the designer is unwilling to put full trust in the MBSE.

The design of the US’s newest Aircraft Carrier, The Gerald Ford Class Carrier, is an excellent example of how Field Testing may be used in conjunction with MBSE.

The US Navy explains that “The Navy designed the Ford-class carrier using advanced computer modeling methods, testing, and analysis to ensure the ships are hardened to withstand harsh battle conditions.” Although MBSE assured engineers that the ship would be safe in battle conditions, field testing was ordered in order to verify the MBSE.  Such verification is not performed for every design.  In fact, the last time field testing was used by the Navy to verify MBSE was in 2016 for Littoral Combat Ships.

Pyrotechnic Shock Testing on August 8, 2021 in water off the coast of Florida validated the ship’s ability to sustain operations in a simulated combat environment.  Forty Thousand pound (40,000 lb) underwater explosions were released at distances progressively closer to the Carrier, which was heavily instrumented to record the amount of shock that was experienced onboard.

The Navy explains that “These shock trials have tested the resiliency of Ford and her crew and provided extensive data used in the process of validating the shock hardness of the ship.”

Engineers should always use MBSE, but must also be familiar with Pyrotechnic Shock Testing which is sometimes required in addition to MBSE.

To read the US Navy’s reporting of this Pyrotechnic Shock Testing, and to see pictures and videos of the testing, you can go here.

To read about and register for ATI’s upcoming Pyrotechnic Shock Testing course, you can go here.

And, as always, to see a full listing of all ATI courses, you can go here

Tireless Wireless

Although the concept of Wireless Communications is pretty simple, the method by which it happens is anything but simple.   It’s like the old joke, we all love to eat sausage, but we really would rather not think about how it is made.  We all take wireless communications for granted when we use our cell phone, […]

Although the concept of Wireless Communications is pretty simple, the method by which it happens is anything but simple.   It’s like the old joke, we all love to eat sausage, but we really would rather not think about how it is made.  We all take wireless communications for granted when we use our cell phone, but there are a lot of things happening behind the scenes.

Wireless networks have a lot of advantages over wired networks.   To name a few, wireless networks are cheaper and easier to install and maintain.  They can be accessed at almost any time from almost any place.  And, wireless networks can transmit more data, and transmit it more quickly than a wired network.  The biggest disadvantage of a wireless network is that it can be more susceptible to security threats and data exploitation.

For years, wireless networks have been considered the norm in communication systems, but in the last two years, the importance of wireless networks has increased dramatically due to the pandemic.  As astutely observed by Ahmadi, Katzis, Shakir, Arvaneh, and Gatherer in their April 2020 paper titled  Wireless Communication and the Pandemic: The Story So Far ,  the role of telecommunications in keeping people connected and working has been phenomenal.

The authors point out that the three most significant contributions of wireless networks have been connectivity for healthcare, connectivity for education, and connectivity for retail and supply chain.  The ability to maintain healthcare, education, and retail has been critical to keeping the world up and running with some sense of normalcy during the pandemic.  

For healthcare, 5G mobile technology can reliably connect hospitals, ambulances, and homes to make healthcare service more efficient.  For education, wireless communications allow students of all ages to remain connected with their teachers, whether they are in the local school, or in a college or university half way around the globe.  For Retail, wireless communications allowed people to purchase necessities, and have them delivered to their homes, without undue exposure to the pathogens.  For companies, wireless communications allowed businesses to order and receive things that allowed them to stay open for business, and keep their workforce working.

There will always be a need for wireless communication networks, but that need will be particularly great during the remainder of this pandemic, and whenever the next pandemic comes about.  It is critical that our wireless communications infrastructure be in place now and in the future to meet the ever-increasing demand for bandwidth.

To learn more about wireless communications, consider taking the upcoming ATI Wireless Communications course.  You can read more about this course, and register for it here

And, as always, a complete list of the ATI courses which may interest you can be found here.

MBSE Is The Answer

Sponsors and customers want their products delivered more quickly, more cheaply, and better than ever.  Those demands are often unreasonable, but we must remain responsive to our customers, and try our best to deliver better, faster and cheaper.  I know you and your staff are already working harder than ever, and this is a lot […]

Sponsors and customers want their products delivered more quickly, more cheaply, and better than ever.  Those demands are often unreasonable, but we must remain responsive to our customers, and try our best to deliver better, faster and cheaper.  I know you and your staff are already working harder than ever, and this is a lot to ask.  Perhaps the answer lies not in how hard you work, but in how smart you work.  As astutely reported by Accenture, “The solution lies in an end-to-end model-based systems engineering strategy.”  Yes, that is the answer.

Accenture tells us that model-based systems engineering (MBSE) applies digital modeling techniques throughout the product development life cycle to evaluate system requirements, design, analysis and verification and validation.  Said differently, it involves more digital modeling on computers, which is relatively cheap, and less field testing which can be quite expensive.  Although some field testing may still be prudent, the vast majority of field testing could be done more cheaply, and perhaps even more effectively, using MBSE.

Accenture also tells us the implementing MBSE can help aerospace and defense companies to increase customer and supplier collaboration, improve engineering efficiency, allow for more rapid product development iterations and drive down in-service support costs. 

Clearly, MBSE is good thing, that all industries should strive to adopt.  So, if you are not using MBSE yet, what are you waiting for.  If you need training, ATI is here to help.

To read Accenture’s full report, you can go here.

To read about and register for ATI’s upcoming MBSE course, you can go here.

And, as always, to see a full listing of all ATI courses, you can go here.

Game Changer

For decades, the state of the art in missile technology has been Ballistic Missiles.   A Ballistic missile follows a ballistic trajectory to deliver its warhead, or warheads, onto a predetermined target.  The missile is put into orbit by a rocket, and the remainder of its flight is unpowered.  The missile simply falls like a rock […]

For decades, the state of the art in missile technology has been Ballistic Missiles.   A Ballistic missile follows a ballistic trajectory to deliver its warhead, or warheads, onto a predetermined target.  The missile is put into orbit by a rocket, and the remainder of its flight is unpowered.  The missile simply falls like a rock on a highly predictable approach.  Due to the nature of its flight, Ballistic Missiles can easily be countered by Anti-Ballistic Missiles.  The ABM can intercept and destroy the Ballistic Missile at any point during its flight.  Many countries have mastered the technology of Ballistic Missiles, and Anti-Ballistic Missile Defense.  It is what drove the Cold War.

In recent years, however, we have been introduced to a new missile technology.  Hypersonic Missiles have changed the art of war as we know it.  Hypersonic missiles travel at least five times the speed of sound, and they can fly much lower to the ground than conventional Ballistic Missiles.  These hypersonic missiles are more of a threat because they are highly maneuverable.  Due to their speed and their maneuverability, they are difficult, if not impossible, to detect by traditional anti-ballistic missile defense systems.  And, due to their immense kinetic energy, they are even more destructive to the target that they are directed toward.  Hypersonic missiles are a game changer. 

Russia, China, North Korea, and the US have all tested hypersonic missiles.  When they become operational and get incorporated into military arsenals, it will be truly significant for both aggressors and target countries. 

This is truly the way of the future in Rocket and Missile technology.  Scientists and engineers need to be familiar with this new type of missile.

If you would like to learn more about Rocket and Missile Fundamentals including the Hypersonic Missile technology, consider enrolling in ATI’s upcoming course Rocket and Missile Fundamentals.  The instructor has recently added a unit discussing Hypersonic Missiles.

As always, a complete listing of ATI’s courses can be found here.

What The Heck Is TMA?

Sonar and Target Motion Analysis Fundamentals is a course being offered by ATI starting on October 19.  Typically, the purpose of this blog is to share the real-world relevance of the material being taught in the class, and typically, there is a lot of real-world relevance to talk about.  Unfortunately, in this case, there is […]

Sonar and Target Motion Analysis Fundamentals is a course being offered by ATI starting on October 19. 

Typically, the purpose of this blog is to share the real-world relevance of the material being taught in the class, and typically, there is a lot of real-world relevance to talk about.  Unfortunately, in this case, there is not much real-world relevance to discuss. 

So, if you are a submarine sonarman, or if you are an engineer developing tools for use by submarine sonarmen, then this is the course for you!  You surely already understand the meaning and importance of Target Motion Analysis, and this class will offer insights that you may not have been exposed to in your Navy or workplace training.

For the rest of the world, since I can’t offer any real-world relevance, I will at least explain what Target Motion Analysis is, and why it is so critical to sonarmen.

Surface Ships use Radar in much the same way that Submarines use Sonar.  One major difference between Surface Ships and Submarines is that stealth is critical to the submarine, and less important to the surface ship.  So, submarines typically do not want to emit any energy from their ship, as that would be detectable by the adversary.  As a result, while Surface Ship Radar actively emits energy, submarine sonar does not.  Submarine Sonars act passively; it only listens to naturally occurring noise, it does not transmit any energy.

When a Surface Ship Radar emits a pulse and listens for a return, the radarman is able to pinpoint the precise location of the contact.  Over time, he can examine the track of his contact, and use this information for tactical purposes.  The process is fairly simple compared to what happens on a submarine.

When a submarine sonarman hears a contact using his passive sonar, he knows nothing more than the direction it is coming from.  Over time, he can develop a time history of the direction to the contact, but that is not the same as a Target Track.  The time history of target direction is of little use for tactical planners; they need to know the track of the contact, which includes the contacts range and direction of travel.  In order to convert the time history of target direction into a usable contact track, the sonarman, or the sonarman’s computer programs, must execute “Target Motion Analysis”.

If you find this explanation interesting, or if it sounds like something that you may be able to apply to your work, please consider joining us for this class.  You can learn more about the class, and register for it here.

A complete listing of our upcoming classes can be found here.

Lastly, a complete listing of all of the courses that ATI can offer upon request can be found here.

SPACEX

On September 15, a SPACEX rocket ship launched four people into earth’s orbit.  The purpose of this blog is not to share all the amazing facts; if you want to read them, you can do it here.  Yes, there has been a lot of space trips going on lately, but I think this one is […]

On September 15, a SPACEX rocket ship launched four people into earth’s orbit.  The purpose of this blog is not to share all the amazing facts; if you want to read them, you can do it here.  Yes, there has been a lot of space trips going on lately, but I think this one is different for a number of reasons.

First of all, the crew of this mission are all amateur astronauts.  Each of the astronauts have a reason for wanting to fly this mission, but the reasons seem to be more philanthropic than with recent space trips.  In fact, the financier for this mission was Jared Isaacman, founder and CEO of a financial services firm.  He financed this mission to raise awareness and donations for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

Secondly, these astronauts are going to be spending days in orbit, not minutes.  The mission will last three days, from launch to splashdown.  For other missions, the goal for the astronauts was to simply check a box that said they entered space, for however brief a period.  For SPACEX, there was actually work done while in space.

Lastly, this mission will orbit at 363 miles above the earth, far higher than previous space trips.  In fact, for one of the previous space trips, it has been questioned whether or not the capsule even reached what is accepted as “space.”

This mission, still in progress at the time of this writing, is shaping up to be really spectacular.

ATI offers many courses related to Space exploration.  You can see our course list here.

And, as always, a full listing of ATI’s courses can be found here.

Advances in Satellite Antenna Technology

Most people know what Origami is.  In case you don’t, the goal of Origami is to transform a flat square sheet of paper into a finished sculpture through folding and sculpting techniques.  Modern origami practitioners generally discourage the use of cuts, glue, or markings on the paper.  So, you ask, how could Origami possibly be […]

Most people know what Origami is.  In case you don’t, the goal of Origami is to transform a flat square sheet of paper into a finished sculpture through folding and sculpting techniques.  Modern origami practitioners generally discourage the use of cuts, glue, or markings on the paper.  So, you ask, how could Origami possibly be related to anything of interest to rocket scientists?  As you will see, there most certainly is a connection between Origami and Antenna technology.

CubeSat is a miniaturized satellite, or nanosatellite, intended for space research.  Due to their small size, large numbers of CubeSats generally perform their unique tasks by working together in large constellations.  To date, there are about 1500 CubeSat satellites in orbit.

Although technology advances have allowed satellites to be effectively miniaturized, the antenna associated with each CubeSat can not be miniaturized; the laws of physics simply do not permit the antenna to be any smaller than it is.  And, since the antenna must remain large, it would not fit in the small area inside the miniature satellite.   Since the antenna is necessary to allow the satellite to communicate with other satellites, and with earth stations, there needed to be a way to get the large antenna into the small satellite. 

As explained here, Dr. Kim and his colleagues at Pusan National University and the University of Alabama, USA, developed a new deployable antenna for CubeSats.  Inspired by the mathematics which are the root of Origami, the team designed an antenna which could be folded and stored inside the Cubesat.  Once in orbit, the antenna would be deployed, and unfolded to its full and functional size.  This new advance in Antenna design now allows nanosatellites to be part of our satellite fleet.

So, although many may have thought that antenna design could not be pushed any further, Dr. Kim proved them wrong.  What other previously unimagined advances in antenna technology are yet to be imagined?

To learn more about Antennas, consider taking the upcoming ATI course entitled Antenna and Array Fundamentals.  You can learn more about this offering, and register, here.

Lastly, as always, a full listing of ATI’s courses can be found here.

Submarine Movie Chat

Although I work for Applied Technology Institute now, I spent 40 years working in a career that had me riding nuclear submarines frequently, often for weeks at a time, doing tests and working closely with sailors in the US Navy.  Suffice it to say, I know a little about Submarines and Submariners.  Admittedly, I do […]

Although I work for Applied Technology Institute now, I spent 40 years working in a career that had me riding nuclear submarines frequently, often for weeks at a time, doing tests and working closely with sailors in the US Navy.  Suffice it to say, I know a little about Submarines and Submariners.  Admittedly, I do not know one one-hundredth of what is known by our many brave Submarine Sailors, past and present, but I but probably know more than most civilians.

So, what is the most realistic, and best Submarine movie ever made?  I am asked this question often, and although I have a quick and definitive response whenever I am asked this question, I decided to do a little research before writing this blog post.  I will reveal my top choice and my bottom choice, later.

When I googled the topic, I had hundreds of hits, so I decided I needed a systematic way to choose which sites I would visit.  I picked three sites.  First, I choose the Number 1 google hit, as google would want me to do.  Second, I chose the US Naval Institute, as I belong to this fine organization, and I trust what they say.  Lastly, I chose IMDB, the greatest movie site on the internet, which everyone should check out if they don’t already know about it. 

Here is what I found.

The two movies that appear on most top ten lists are Das Boat and Hunt for Red October.  These movies are not always Number one and two, but they are almost always on the list.

Many of the movies of the movies on top ten lists are foreign films.  Many are also older films from the WW2 era starring famous actors who are no longer with us.  There are many films in this category ( foreign and older ) which I have never seen before. In fact, based on the recommendation by a Navy Captain on the USNI site, before writing this blog, I decided to watch the 2019 UK-French film called “The Wolf’s Call”; more on that to follow. 

 Most of the movies on these lists make sense.  Even if I have never seen the movie before, the title and the picture on the box look like they would be submarine movie.  The one notable exception was a top- choice chosen by an officer in the US Navy on the US Naval Institute Site.  He chose “Office Space” as his top choice.  He justified his choice by saying “TPS reports, multiple bosses, a defective printer, coming in on Saturday, the oversight team of The Bobs that are There to Help, and the engineers are not allowed to talk to the normal people.”    A rather bizarre choice, but humorous and understandable to anyone who has served on a sub.

Some of the movies that people put on their top pick list were terrible movies.  My bottom choice actually appears on some of the lists.

So, after reviewing these sites, and after watching a new movie which piqued my interest, I will reveal my top choice and my bottom choice.  Top choice was, and remains, Das Boat.  (Honorable Mention goes to Hunt for Red October.)  Bottom Choice was, and remains, Crimson Tide.  My latest movie, The Wolf’s Call, did not impress me, in fact, it would be fairly low on my list.  I look forward to watching a few more of the submarine movies that I have not seen.  Who knows, I may find one that beats Das Boat.  Please feel free to leave recommendations in the comments section.

From IMDB, the tag line for 1981 film Das Boat is “The claustrophobic world of a WWII German U-Boat; boredom, filth, and sheer terror.”  I have seen this film many times, and I still enjoy watching it each time I see it.  This film is ranked as IMDBs second best Submarine Movie, and as IMDB’s 77th best overall movie.

 ATI has a submarine related course coming up in late September called SONAR Signal Processing.  You can learn more about this course, and register, here.

Another fun course offered by ATI is Submarines and Submariners.  Although this course is not being offered in the near future, you can read about it here.  If this course interests you, and you would like us to run it, or bring it your location for your staff, please let us know, and we can work with you.

Lastly, as always, a full listing of ATI’s courses can be found here.

International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE)

How many of you know about the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) or the various INCOSE Certifications including Associate Systems Engineering Professional ( ASEP ), Certified Systems Engineering Professional (CSEP), or Expert Systems Engineering Professional ( ESEP )? The purpose of this Blog post is to enlighten those who are not aware of the […]

How many of you know about the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) or the various INCOSE Certifications including Associate Systems Engineering Professional ( ASEP ), Certified Systems Engineering Professional (CSEP), or Expert Systems Engineering Professional ( ESEP )?

The purpose of this Blog post is to enlighten those who are not aware of the INCOSE organization, or the INCOSE certifications.  Both of these are things that most Systems Engineers should already know about, and if you don’t, you may find this informative.

INCOSE is comprised of nearly 20,000 Systems Engineering Professionals.  Their mission, as stated on their web page, is “to address complex societal and technical challenges by enabling, promoting, and advancing Systems Engineering and systems approaches.”  Also from their web page, the goals of INCOSE are to 1) be a focal point for dissemination of systems engineering knowledge, 2) promote international collaboration 3) Assure the establishment of professional standards in systems engineering, 4) improve the professional status of all systems engineers, and 5) encourage governmental and industrial support for Systems Engineering.  There is a wealth of other information on their web page, so anyone interested in INCOSE should visit the INCOSE Web site.

One of the services that INCOSE has provided is a mechanism for Systems Engineers to be certified at some level as a Systems Engineering Professional ( ASEP, CSEP or ESEP ), indicating that they have met all of the standards defined by INCOSE, indicating that the individual is a qualified Systems Engineer.   Earning an INCOSE certification is not easy, but it is something that over 3000 individuals have accomplished to date.

Mark Wilson, from Strategy Bridge and INCOSE recently published a fascinating article where he pontificates on whether or not the INCOSE CSEP certification is worthwhile.   Warning, spoilers coming, leave this page immediately if you don’t want to know how the story ends …….  He concludes that the INCOSE SE certifications ARE worthwhile, both for the individual who earns the certification, and for the organization that employs that individual.

Earning the ASEP certification requires that the individual pass a rigorous exam demonstrating knowledge of Systems Engineering concepts.  CSEP certification also requires that the individual have a demonstrated track record of having worked successfully in a Systems Engineering role.  ESEP certification simply raises the bar and requires more experience.    To prepare for the exam, candidates often take a short-course which reviews many of the concepts that are tested.

Applied Technology Institute offers a 3-day short course called CSEP Preparation which will prepare students for the INCOSE SE exam, applicable to any of the three certification levels.  This course walks through the CSEP requirements and the INCOSE Handbook to cover all topics that might be on the INCOSE exam. Interactive work, study plans, and three sets of sample examination questions help you to prepare effectively for the exam. Participants leave the course with solid knowledge, a hard copy of the INCOSE Handbook, study plans, and a sample examination.

ATI will be offering the next CSEP Prep ( live virtual ) class starting on September 27.  Students may register for this class using the link above.  If you would like to learn more about the CSEP certification prior to registering for the course, ATI will be offering a free short session ( live virtual ) on September 10 where the instructor will provide information about CSEP and CSEP Prep class.  Additional information on this free short session, and link to register, can be found here.

We hope to see you at the CSEP short session, or the CSEP Prep course, in September. 

Radar Keeping Your Car Safe

How many of us actually think about automation and safety when we drive our cars? Rest assured, the Department of Transportation has a well thought-out plan which has been documented in a series of reports.  In 2017, DOT issued Automated Driving Systems, A Vision for Safety 2.0.  In 2018, the DOT expanded the scope of […]

How many of us actually think about automation and safety when we drive our cars? Rest assured, the Department of Transportation has a well thought-out plan which has been documented in a series of reports.  In 2017, DOT issued Automated Driving Systems, A Vision for Safety 2.0.  In 2018, the DOT expanded the scope of their guidance to all surface on-road transportation systems when they issued Preparing for the Future of Transportation: Automated Vehicles 3.0.  Most recently, in 2020, DOT again expanded the scope of their guidance when they issued Ensuring American Leadership in Automated Vehicle Technologies: Automated Vehicles 4.0.  

The concepts described in this series of reports date back to second half of the twentieth century (1950 -2000) when engineers concentrated on the most rudimentary safety and convenience features such as seat belts, cruise control, and anti-lock brakes.  During the next 10 years ( 2000 – 2010 ), engineers worked on advanced safety features like blind spot detection, and warnings for lane departure and forward collisions.  These advances simply alerted the driver to a potential safety issue, but still did nothing to remedy the situation.  From 2010 to 2016, engineers came up with driver assistance features like automatic emergency braking and lane centering assist.  These features were the start of the path toward fully automated vehicles.  From 2016 to 2025, we will become acquainted with partially automated safety features like adaptive cruise control and self-park.  All of this should lead us to a fully automated vehicle capable of driving on highways using autopilot in the years following 2025.  It has been a relatively short span of time, and there have been many advances in automated vehicle technology.

As automobile drivers, we are not really sure how these automated systems work.  We simply know that they work, and we are glad that they are there to help us out.  Behind the scenes, however, engineers and scientist are thinking about the requirements and designs and continuously developing ways to advance the state of the art. 

While radars were once only associated with complex military systems, they are becoming more common today in cars that require them for many of the automated features that have been developed over the years.  Simple radar technology is behind many of the collision avoidance features in today’s cars, and it was instrumental in turning simple cruise control into adaptive cruise control.   In order for automated features in cars to advance, however, so to must the state of the art in radar.  One such advance in radar technology is its ability to not only detect a target, but to track it too.  And then, another advance is its ability to track multiple targets at the same time.  Advances in this technology will truly advance our ability to move closer to the goal a fully automated vehicle.

To learn more about advances in multi target tracking, consider enrolling in the upcoming offering of ATI’s Multi Target Tracking and Multi Sensor Data Fusion.  Also, take a look at the schedule of upcoming ATI courses here

Yeah, But What If?

Submarine accidents which result in the submarine careening to the sea bottom are spectacular in Hollywood movies and video games, but they do not happen often in real life.  In fact, for the U.S., we have not lost a submarine to the depths since 1968 when USS Scorpion was lost with 99 souls due ( […]

Submarine accidents which result in the submarine careening to the sea bottom are spectacular in Hollywood movies and video games, but they do not happen often in real life.  In fact, for the U.S., we have not lost a submarine to the depths since 1968 when USS Scorpion was lost with 99 souls due ( most likely) to an inadvertent activation of a battery or a torpedo.  Prior to that, in 1963, USS Thresher was lost with 129 souls due to ( most likely ) a piping failure during a deep dive.  Due to actions taken as a result of lessons learned from those two mishaps, the U.S. has not had a major submarine loss since then.  The safety record for U.S. Submarines since 1968 has been remarkable, and the envy of other countries.

Yeah, but what if?

To be prudent, the U.S. must assume that there will be submarine accidents in the future, even if they are not U.S. submarines.  For this reason, the U.S. continues to maintain a force dedicated to the rescue of downed submarines.  Undersea Rescue Command (URC) is the U.S. Navy’s official command for the rescue of sailors during a submarine casualty anywhere in the world.   If you would like to learn more about this command, you can read about it here.

The blog author has had some personal experience working with the Undersea Rescue Command, and all comments that follow are the authors personal opinions, and not an official opinion of the U.S. Navy or Applied Technology Institute.  In case you missed that, please go back and read it again.

Two significant issues that confront the Undersea Rescue Command are funding and localization. 

The funding issue arises from the fact that our submarines are so safe, and our safety record is so good, there is a hesitance to pay too much attention ( and funding ) to an organization which may not ever be called into service.  Unfortunately, there is not much the technical community can do about that; it will have to fall upon the Public Relations Office at U.S. Navy. 

Localization, however, is a problem which the technical community can help solve.  When a submarine goes to the bottom, the Undersea Rescue Command jumps into action, and reports to the vicinity of the accident very quickly.  Unfortunately, the Undersea Rescue Command cannot start their rescue mission until the precise location of the sunken submarine is known, and that is often a difficult problem.  Until the submarine is located, the rescue can not actually begin.  Often, in exercises, or in other countries, by the time the submarine is located, it has become a recovery mission rather than a rescue mission. 

So, how can we simplify the task of locating a downed submarine?  Some of the answer lies in the concept of operations, or things that a distressed submarine can do to facilitate the search for them.  Some of the answer lies in advances in sonars and sonar signal processing.  And the rest of the answer lies in innovative new ideas, for example, using AUVs or UUVs to find distressed submarines ( cool idea ). 

Applied Technology Institute is offering several courses in the coming months that will help you brush up on your skills, so that you can apply them to this problem.  You can find information about our Sonar Signal Processing course, and register for the course here.  Additionally, you can find information about our Passive and Active Acoustics Fundamentals course, and register for the course here.  Lastly, a full listing of ATI’s Acoustics and Sonar Engineering Courses ( including AUV and UUV courses ) can be found here.  If you are interested in a course which is not currently on the schedule, please let us know, so we can try to schedule an offering soon.

As I said earlier, the author has had the pleasure of working with the Undersea Rescue Command several years ago, and was very impressed with the hard work and dedication exhibited by all members of their team.  The following picture shows me and the rest of the JHU/APL Team that worked with the URC.  We are posing inside of the Pressurized Rescue Module which travels to the distressed submarine to perform the rescue.  Although no one would ever want to experience being on a submarine in distress, they should feel encouraged that a team as dedicated and qualified as URC is on the job.

UAVs at the 2020 Olympics

I am so excited that the Tokyo Olympics are finally here, and things seem to be going well for USA so far. I really wanted this week’s blog to be related to the Olympics, so I searched for some aspect of the Olympics that could be related to Science and Technology.  I had to look […]

I am so excited that the Tokyo Olympics are finally here, and things seem to be going well for USA so far.

I really wanted this week’s blog to be related to the Olympics, so I searched for some aspect of the Olympics that could be related to Science and Technology.  I had to look no further than the Opening Ceremonies.  The Intel Drone Light Show was absolutely spectacular, and it reminded me of the power of UAVs.  If you missed it, you can watch it here.

In the early days of UAVs, scientists seemed to concentrate on the military aspects of UAVs, and UAVs were used mostly as instruments of war.  Now, however, UAVs are being used for so much more.

CBInsights published an article, 38 Ways Drones Will Impact Society: From Fighting War to Forecasting Weather, UAVs Change Everything.  This article reminds us that UAVs have applications in Defense, Emergency Response, Disaster Relief, Conservation, Disease Relief, Healthcare, Agriculture, Weather, Maritime, Waste Management, Energy, Mining, Construction, Infrastructure, Insurance, Realty, Urban Planning, Personal Transportation,  Airlines, Telecommunications, Internet, Outdoors, tourism, Entertainments, Sports, Hollywood, advertising, retail, manufacturing, fighting crime, fitness, food services, journalism, air travel, gaming, space, education, and security.   In fact, there are even other applications which are not even discussed in the article.  The possibilities are endless.

The Intel Drone Light Show at the Olympics was amazing.  In the future, using Drones for aerial displays may well replace Fireworks for large venues.  Although Drones may be more a more expensive option at this time, they are more versatile, and they may get cheaper, and they are certainly safer.  Think of how many fingers and limbs will be saved, as long as people steer clear of propellers.

Since UAVs are gaining in popularity, now might be a good time to brush up on your UAV Design skills.  ATI is offering a course that can help you with that.  You can read about the ATI UAV Design course, and you can register for our upcoming offering here.  

A full listing of all the courses offered by ATI can be found here.

Leading The Way, To Diversity

Leading by example, that is one of the things that I admire most. Leading people on, that is something I do not like at all. So, you may be asking, where am I going with this blog?  I am glad you asked. I have been active in STEM recruiting for many years.  I have always […]

Leading by example, that is one of the things that I admire most.

Leading people on, that is something I do not like at all.

So, you may be asking, where am I going with this blog?  I am glad you asked.

I have been active in STEM recruiting for many years.  I have always been of the belief that Science and Engineering stands to benefit immensely by having a diverse work force.  For that reason, I believe that it is important that smart and enthusiastic people be attracted to, and recruited by, the STEM workforce.  This should include males and females, young and old, minorities and non-minorities, democrats and republicans, straight and gay, I could go on and on.  But we must find people who are joining the STEM workforce for the right reasons.  I do not believe that anyone, regardless of their demographics, should be encouraged to enter the STEM workforce solely because jobs are plentiful or salaries are high.  To recruit someone using only these enticements would simply be “leading them on.”  It would set those individuals up for unhappiness and failure, and that would be wrong.  STEM workers need to love STEM, and find a job which allows them to love working in STEM.  A better way for recruiting a diverse STEM workforce would be for a STEM professional from one of the underrepresented groups “leading by example”, thus showing other members of that underrepresented group that STEM careers can be fun and rewarding as well as profitable.

I recently learned about Abagail Harrison, also known as Astronaut Abby.  She is a young  STEM professional from an underrepresented group, and she is effectively leading by example.  She generally does not call attention to the fact that she is a well-paid woman in STEM, but rather, she simply shows her excitement and her achievements in STEM, and thus becomes a role model that similar underrepresented people can aspire to, if, and only if, they are attracted to work in the STEM field.    Take a look at her Mars Generation Page, and you will see what I mean. 

Abagail does occasionally use her blog to salute certain underrepresented groups.  In one blog post, she identifies “11 Women Who Broke Barriers in the Space Industry”.  In another recent blog post, she identified “10 Black Americans Who Made Extraordinary Contributions to Space Exploration.”  In both these cases, she is providing a list of role models who our future STEM workforce can look up to.

So, what can a Technical Training company do to increase diversity in the STEM workforce?  We can continue to track our statistics, and watch to see if the situation is improving.  We look forward to a day in the future when the efforts of people like Abagail Harrison will result in a more diverse STEM workforce, a more diverse set of potential Instructors, and a more diverse Student pool.  When that day comes, ATI will be blessed with the opportunity to have more underrepresented Instructors, and more underrepresented students. 

In the meantime, please support businesses like ours that are making every effort to see more diversity in the STEM workforce.  To learn more about Applied Technology Institute, or to register for one of our courses, or to register for one of our free short courses, please visit us at www.ATIcourses.com.

You’re Going To The Moon, Alice

Mankind has always been fascinated with exploring the Moon, and that will probably always be the case.  At first, in the time leading up to the famous first moon landing in 1969, the goal was simply to reach the moon, and spend a short time looking around, and return to earth safely.  Now, 50 years […]

Mankind has always been fascinated with exploring the Moon, and that will probably always be the case.  At first, in the time leading up to the famous first moon landing in 1969, the goal was simply to reach the moon, and spend a short time looking around, and return to earth safely.  Now, 50 years later, the goal is more ambitious since technology can support so much more.  The first objective today is to reach the moon, and stay there.  The next goal would be to use the moon as a landing pad to support exploration of things beyond the moon, most notably Mars.  The NASA Artemis Missions will be the way these objectives are accomplished.  I am not sure about you, but this mission snuck up on me, and I am learning about it now. 

The Artemis Mission is comprised of six projects which together will allow NASA to accomplish its goals of reaching the moon, staying on the moon for long term exploration, and getting closer to ultimate goal of being able to send men (and women) beyond the moon.  The six projects include:

Ground Systems – Upgrading Earth ground systems to support the larger rockets which will be needed

Space Launch System – The new and more powerful rocket that will launch man toward the moon and beyond

Orion – The spacecraft that will bring astronauts to the moon’s orbit, and return them to earth from the moon’s orbit

Gateway – The outpost spacecraft which will orbit the moon and be living quarters for the astronauts when they are not on the moon surface

Lunar Landers – The spacecraft which will transfer astronauts between the Gateway and the moon Surface, and

Space Suits – The new and improved suits that the astronauts will need to carry out their mission.

The timeline for this mission has three major milestones, namely, the three Artemis missions, Artemis I, Artemis II, and Artemis III.

Artemis I – an unmanned flight to test the Space Launch System and Orion, scheduled for 2021

Artemis II – a manned flight to test the Space Launch System and Orion, scheduled for 2022

Artemis III – A manned flight to the moon that will return man to the moon.

This is a truly ambitious mission, and an even more ambitious schedule.

ATI offers a plethora of courses which relate to Space exploration.  Check out our list of Space related courses here.    If you are interested in the legal aspects of Space exploration, you can register for our upcoming Astropolitics class here

Although the author thinks Space Exploration is exciting and important, and I fully endorse all of the goals of the Artemis Mission, I can’t help but wonder why the Government is not spending at least as much money on exploration of the deep oceans.  I would challenge the US to start investing more money in Ocean Exploration, but not at the expense of Space Exploration.  Both of these are important.  I am curious what readers think about this issue, please leave your comments below.

And, if you are interested in Ocean Exploration, ATI has a few courses which may be of interest to you too.  Please check out our full list of offerings here.

And if you simply want to learn more about the Artemis Mission, you can go to the NASA Artemis site that describes the mission in more detail. 

SPACEX Is At It Again

There is a new record for the most spacecraft launched by a single rocket at one time.  In January, The Transporter-1 mission, part of  SpaceX’s SmallSat Rideshare Program, lifted off atop a Falcon 9 booster from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida with 143 satellites aboard.  Among the satellites […]

There is a new record for the most spacecraft launched by a single rocket at one time.  In January, The Transporter-1 mission, part of  SpaceX’s SmallSat Rideshare Program, lifted off atop a Falcon 9 booster from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida with 143 satellites aboard.  Among the satellites in the payload, 10 SpaceX STARLINK satellites, which will be added to a constellation which will provide a global internet system.

Many more details on this amazing accomplishment can be found at the SPACEX website, SpaceX Falcon 9 Transporter 1 Rocket Launch – January 2021 – Space Coast Launches

Additional details on upcoming SPACEX Launches can also be found at this site.

To learn more about Space Missions like these, please consider taking one of the many Space Courses offered virtually at this time by Applied Technology Institute. 

A complete list of ATI Space Courses can be found at  https://aticourses.com/events/cat-5-space-satellite-and-aerospace/

ATI Announces NEW FREE short course sessions

ATI is pleased to announce a new series of free virtual short courses starting in January 2021, led by industry leaders and some of your favorite instructors.  These 1-hour sessions, from 12:30pm to 1:30pm ET, will be delivered live and you will have an opportunity to ask the instructors questions at the end of the […]

ATI is pleased to announce a new series of free virtual short courses starting in January 2021, led by industry leaders and some of your favorite instructors.  These 1-hour sessions, from 12:30pm to 1:30pm ET, will be delivered live and you will have an opportunity to ask the instructors questions at the end of the session.  Each short session includes an important take way from one of our full courses that can be implemented on your project.  Keep visiting aticourses.com as we schedule more.

January 8th

CSEP preparation – January 8, 2021 – FREE short session – Virtual Live Webinar

Instructor: William “Bill” Fournier

Full course January 26 – 28

Certified Systems Engineering Professional

_______________________________________________________________________________

January 25

Fix EMI Problems in Cables & Connectors – January 25, 2021 FREE short session

Instructor: Daryl Gerke

Full course February 23-26

EMI/EMC in Military Systems

_______________________________________________________________________________

February 1

Combat EW Operations in Southeast Asia, a Focused Retrospective on EW – February 1, 2021 FREE short session

Instructor: Dr. Clayton Stewart

Full curse March 9-11

21st Century EW

______________________________________________________________________________

March 12, 2021

Anti-Radiation Missiles – March 12, 2021 FREE short session

Instructor: Dr. Clayton Stewart

Full course May 4-6

Electronic Protection and Electronic Attack

Hand-Held Radar Detects Jet?

An ATI Staff Member who has not taken any ATI Radar Courses yet found a story in her Inbox about a highway officer in Texas who was operating a hand-held radar to catch speeders.  As you can read in the following copy of the letter, the officer purportedly locked onto a USMC F/A-18 Hornet Jet.  […]

An ATI Staff Member who has not taken any ATI Radar Courses yet found a story in her Inbox about a highway officer in Texas who was operating a hand-held radar to catch speeders.  As you can read in the following copy of the letter, the officer purportedly locked onto a USMC F/A-18 Hornet Jet.  The story purports that the Jet detected energy from the hand held radar, and automatic tactical systems on the Jet nearly fired on the radar/officer, but the pilot overrode those automatic systems preventing a catastrophic mishap.

Although this story is humorous, it also demonstrates that the writer, and some readers, are not familiar with how hand-held radars work, and how the Tactical Systems on the USMC Jet work.  In fact, a Snopes article gives an excellent explanation of why this story, although humorous and entertaining, is not factual, and could not have actually occurred.  A fascinating explanation of the fallacies associated with this story can be found at   https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/police-radar-missile/

So, in order to better recognize articles like this for what they are, please consider learning more about Radar Systems.  ATI offers 78 courses dealing with Radar, Missiles, and Defense, but our most popular Radar courses are Radar 101, Radar 201, and Radar Principles.  More information on all of these courses can be found on the ATI web page at the following links.

https://aticourses.com/training_classes/radar-101/
https://aticourses.com/training_classes/radar-201-d223/
https://aticourses.com/training_classes/radar-principles/

In Memory of Thomas Stanley Logsdon

Thomas Stanley Logsdon, 82, of Seal Beach, California, passed away on May 1, 2020. Tom was an internationally recognized rocket scientist, author, expert witness, keynote lecturer, and short course instructor. He used his extraordinary knowledge of mathematics and physics to help put a dozen astronauts on the moon and played an integral role in the […]

Thomas Stanley Logsdon, 82, of Seal Beach, California, passed away on May 1, 2020. Tom was an internationally recognized rocket scientist, author, expert witness, keynote lecturer, and short course instructor. He used his extraordinary knowledge of mathematics and physics to help put a dozen astronauts on the moon and played an integral role in the invention of the Global Positioning System (GPS), which is so vital to our modern world.

Tom was a well-recognized and praised Applied Technology Instructor for more than 30 years. Tom would typically come teach his courses in Columbia two or three times yearly, enjoying a long friendship during dinners with ATI’s President Jim Jenkins. A great friendship also developed between Lisa Badart and Tom, with over 13 years of working together to schedule and facilitate his courses. He loved to share with Lisa his adventures and stories. ATI Staff old and new loved working with him. He will be missed by all. See some links to his popular courses below.

Tom was born on September 27th, 1937 to George Stanley Logsdon and Margaret Buckman Logsdon, in Springfield Kentucky. After graduating from Springfield High School in 1955, he went on to earn a Bachelor’s degree in Math & Physics at Eastern Kentucky University and a Master’s degree in Point-Set Topology (Mathematics) from the University of Kentucky. He had many wonderful teachers, but always fondly recalled Prof. Robertson from Springfield High School, and his college mentor, Dr. Smith Park, a beloved Mathematics professor at EKU. In 1984, he was awarded an honorary PhD from EKU and was the Alumni of the year for EKU’s 100th anniversary.

After graduation, Tom landed his first job as an Aero-ballistics Engineer for McDonnell Douglas Aircraft in Santa Monica, CA, kicking off a 32-year career in the aerospace industry. He was recruited by Rockwell International to become a Trajectory Mathematician on the Apollo Space program. When asked about his job on a television interview, he said, with his usual clever sense of humor, “before the flight, we predict where the rocket will go, and after the flight we try to explain why it didn’t go there!”

He went on to work on the Shuttle Spacecraft program and in the mid-1970s Tom employed his mathematical genius to determine the placement of 24 satellites (satellite constellation) which make up our worldwide GPS. He was recently recognized as one of 28 original Inventors of GPS. While at Rockwell, he also worked on the Saturn V moon rocket, Skylab flight maneuvers, and unmanned Mars missions. He was also awarded the Rockwell Presidential Award and held a patent centered around navigation of jetliners.

In addition, Tom was a well-respected author, writing over 30 books, from his first book about space travel, “A Rush Toward the Stars”, to some of the first computer programming books, to his best-selling “Six Simple Solutions that Shook the World.”  He also taught computer science at USC for many years.

After retiring from Rockwell, Tom ran a full-time business up until his death, producing books, magazine articles, and technical papers; teaching GPS & Orbital Mechanics short courses for NASA & JPL, lecturing around the world, being a guest speaker for Crystal Cruises (averaging 8 cruises a year), and appearing on radio and TV.

He was passionate about playing tennis and did so until just prior to his death. His career and pleasure travel took him to over 100 countries, all seven continents, and around the globe several times over. In 2016, Tom was inducted into the Kentucky Aviation Museum Hall of Fame.

Tom wed Cynda (Cyndi) Hedrick in Newport Beach, CA and became stepfather to Chad Stephen Logsdon.  Cyndi Logsdon actively supported Tom’s business by designing his charts & course materials; giving him feedback on his courses, books, and presentations; keeping him organized; and accompanying him to many exotic places to coordinate his appearances.

Tom was preceded in death by his parents, Stanley and Margaret Logsdon, his wife Cynda, his sister, Ann Logsdon Sims of Bardstown, KY, and two sisters who died in infancy, Molly and Rose Mary. He is survived by daughter, Donna (Drew) Schilder, along with his stepson Chad, his brother, Pat (Patsy) Logsdon of Loretto, KY, seven nieces and nephews, and numerous great-nieces and nephews.

Tom’s ATI courses offered over 30 years        

Global Navigation Satellite Systems

If You Want to BE a Rocket Scientist, Maybe You should LISTEN to one

GPS Solutions on Earth and in Space

Applied Technology Institute Instructor, Tom Logsdon, Helps International Surveyors Master Their Craft

GPS/GNSS Operation for Engineers and Technical Professionals – Virtual Webinar Live

 Please join us for a virtual/Zoommeeting for:

Tom Logsdon’s Virtual “Celebration of Life”

May 30 at 10 AM PST

Zoom Video Conference Info:

Join from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android: 

https://zoom.us/j/2014287217

 US: +16699006833,,2014287217#

Or Telephone Dial-In: 

US: +1 669 900 6833 or +1 646 876 9923

International numbers link

 Meeting ID: 201 428 7217

NOTE: If you have not used Zoom before, to see the video, you will need to download the App on your smartphone, Mac, or PC prior to joining the meeting.  You can go here and choose the appropriate platform: https://zoom.us/download or when you click on the meeting link above, it will ask you to download the App. Or You can call in to the Telephone Dial-In number and just listen.                         

The World Is Changing, So Maybe ATI Should Too.

The world is changing, so maybe ATI should too. Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has conducted specialized training in satellite communications, space, defense, radar, sonar and acoustics, signal processing, and specialized engineering and systems engineering since 1984.  Our clients include DOD, government agencies, military, government and military contractors, technical industries, NASA facilities, and aerospace contractors. A […]

The world is changing, so maybe ATI should too.

Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has conducted specialized training in satellite communications, space, defense, radar, sonar and acoustics, signal processing, and specialized engineering and systems engineering since 1984.  Our clients include DOD, government agencies, military, government and military contractors, technical industries, NASA facilities, and aerospace contractors.

A complete list of ATI’s offerings can be found at https://aticourses.com/courses/   .  At a glance, it appears to be a comprehensive list of courses that would be of interest to any Rocket Scientist, who, as the ATI tagline suggests, we believe to be our core students.

The year is now 2020 and a lot of things have changed since Applied Technology Institute was founded in 1984.  Technology has advanced in ways that could never have been anticipated, wars are no longer being fought in the same way, and relationships between countries are no longer as stable as they had once been.  The world is changing, so maybe ATI should too.

Perhaps, employees of our core customers ( DOD, government agencies, military, government and military contractors, technical industries, NASA facilities, and aerospace contractors ) need to be more than just Rocket Scientists today.  In addition to understanding Rocket Science, they may also need to be familiar with the world in which the Rockets will be deployed, and the geo political conditions under which they will be deployed.  With this additional background, the Rocket Scientist will be better able to understand the requirements of his Rockets, and the needs of the soldiers who will be using those Rockets.  Said differently, perhaps the Rocket needs to be considered as a part of a larger system which includes the organizations that use the Rocket, and the goals of those organizations. 

So, through this blog, ATI is asking our readers for their opinion.  Should ATI expand our course offerings to include more courses which will show Rocket Scientists how and why their Rockets will be used?

One example of a possible new ATI course deals with Peacekeeping and Stability Operations.  The following Course Description is from the syllabus of “Peacekeeping and Stability Operations”. The instructor for this course would be Mr. Stephen Phillips from JHU/APL.

 Course Description ( Peacekeeping and Stability Operations )  Intelligence plays a pivotal role in the identification, preparation, and execution of peacekeeping and stability operations performed in a multinational context. Stability and peace operations are designed to prevent, contain, or resolve regional conflicts. These operations are increasingly becoming a core mission in supporting the overall goals and objectives of the current global conflict. This course examines the concepts of nation building, stabilization, reconstruction, and transition across the spectrum of peace operations and analyzes the role of various actors, including nongovernmental organizations, intergovernmental organizations, private military companies, and government organizations, and how they interact in the stabilization mission and environment.

One example of an American intervention to stabilize and reduce the expansion of conflict occurred in the Persian Gulf in the 1980s.  Operation Earnest Will was the American Military protection of Kuwaiti-owned tankers from Iranian attacks in 1987/1988, three years into the Tanker War phase of the Iran-Iraq War.   Steve recently presented an excellent summary of Operation Earnest Will.  This presentation can be viewed at   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FZUQiKDmhE8

ATI looks forward to growing our course list, and growing our student body, through collaborations such as this.  Again, we would love to hear what you think.

What we have here is a failure to communicate ( Systems Engineering )

Although the term “Systems Engineering” dates back to the 1940s, and the concept was practiced even earlier than that, there seems to be a growing emphasis on System Engineering, perhaps because Systems have become more complex in recent times.  During my early years of training and practice as an electrical engineer decades ago, I do […]

Although the term “Systems Engineering” dates back to the 1940s, and the concept was practiced even earlier than that, there seems to be a growing emphasis on System Engineering, perhaps because Systems have become more complex in recent times.  During my early years of training and practice as an electrical engineer decades ago, I do not recall hearing or learning much about Systems Engineering, but it seems to have gotten much more well-deserved attention since then.  Feel free to argue these points if you wish, but this has been my observation.

So, what can go wrong if Systems Engineering principles are ignored?  What could possibly go wrong if you have multiple engineers concentrating on their own aspect of the overall design, and no one paying attention to the overall system?    Take a look at this humorous video and see what can happen…

But seriously, though…..

One of the best descriptions of Systems Engineering that I have seen is from INCOSE ( International Council on Systems Engineering ).  It says “Systems engineers are at the heart of creating successful new systems. They are responsible for the system concept, architecture, and design. They analyze and manage complexity and risk. They decide how to measure whether the deployed system actually works as intended. They are responsible for a myriad of other facets of system creation. Systems engineering is the discipline that makes their success possible – their tools, techniques, methods, knowledge, standards, principles, and concepts. The launch of successful systems can invariably be traced to innovative and effective systems engineering.”

So, how can today’s busy and overworked engineer learn more about Systems Engineering?  Or, even if you think you already know everything about Systems Engineering, how can you refresh your knowledge so it is more relevant to the workplace of 2019? 

Applied Technology Institute may have exactly what you are looking for.  ATI recently merged with Honourcode, Inc., and now offers a full line of Systems Engineering courses being taught by original Honourcode instructors, including Eric Honour.

 There is still time to register for our next offering of Applied Systems Engineering, being offered in Columbia, Md starting on September 23, 2019.  This course includes a  hands-on class exercise conducted in small groups. Part A analyzes a system concept and requirements, developing specific test requirements,. Part B creates an effective test program and test procedures for the product system. Part C builds the robotic systems per assembly instructions. Part D implements the test program to evaluate the final robots.  It is a really fun and informative in-class exercise.   Here is a cool video of the System Product built in this class.

Please read more about this opportunity at the following link.

https://aticourses.com/training_classes/applied-systems-engineering-m120/