Advances in Satellite Antenna Technology

Most people know what Origami is.  In case you don’t, the goal of Origami is to transform a flat square sheet of paper into a finished sculpture through folding and sculpting techniques.  Modern origami practitioners generally discourage the use of cuts, glue, or markings on the paper.  So, you ask, how could Origami possibly be […]

Most people know what Origami is.  In case you don’t, the goal of Origami is to transform a flat square sheet of paper into a finished sculpture through folding and sculpting techniques.  Modern origami practitioners generally discourage the use of cuts, glue, or markings on the paper.  So, you ask, how could Origami possibly be related to anything of interest to rocket scientists?  As you will see, there most certainly is a connection between Origami and Antenna technology.

CubeSat is a miniaturized satellite, or nanosatellite, intended for space research.  Due to their small size, large numbers of CubeSats generally perform their unique tasks by working together in large constellations.  To date, there are about 1500 CubeSat satellites in orbit.

Although technology advances have allowed satellites to be effectively miniaturized, the antenna associated with each CubeSat can not be miniaturized; the laws of physics simply do not permit the antenna to be any smaller than it is.  And, since the antenna must remain large, it would not fit in the small area inside the miniature satellite.   Since the antenna is necessary to allow the satellite to communicate with other satellites, and with earth stations, there needed to be a way to get the large antenna into the small satellite. 

As explained here, Dr. Kim and his colleagues at Pusan National University and the University of Alabama, USA, developed a new deployable antenna for CubeSats.  Inspired by the mathematics which are the root of Origami, the team designed an antenna which could be folded and stored inside the Cubesat.  Once in orbit, the antenna would be deployed, and unfolded to its full and functional size.  This new advance in Antenna design now allows nanosatellites to be part of our satellite fleet.

So, although many may have thought that antenna design could not be pushed any further, Dr. Kim proved them wrong.  What other previously unimagined advances in antenna technology are yet to be imagined?

To learn more about Antennas, consider taking the upcoming ATI course entitled Antenna and Array Fundamentals.  You can learn more about this offering, and register, here.

Lastly, as always, a full listing of ATI’s courses can be found here.

Clearance Sale: Radar, Antennas & Electronic Warfare Textbooks

Best Sellers There’s a reason behind this bit of “peer pressure”…each of these books were perused at length by your peers before purchase. Principles of Modern Radar: Basic Principles Mark Richards, Jim Scheer, Bill Holm Special price: $105 Introduction to Adaptive Arrays, 2nd Ed. Bob Monzingo, Randy Haupt, Tom Miller Special Preliminary Paperback $69 We […]
Best Sellers
POMR CoverThere’s a reason behind this bit of “peer pressure”…each of these books were perused at length by your peers before purchase. Principles of Modern Radar: Basic Principles Mark Richards, Jim Scheer, Bill Holm Special price: $105
Monzingo/Haupt/MillerIntroduction to Adaptive Arrays, 2nd Ed. Bob Monzingo, Randy Haupt, Tom Miller Special Preliminary Paperback $69
We printed a number of paperbacks just in time for the conference and you can get these now for only $69!
Save Now – Radar
Principles of Waveform Diversity and Design Michael Wicks et al, 2010, List: $189, Now $149
Phased Array Radar Design Tom Jeffrey, 2009, List $89, Now $65
Fundamentals of Ground Radar for ATC Engineers and… Ronald Bouwman, 2009, List $129, Now $89
Introduction to Sensors for Ranging and Imaging Graham Brooker, 2009, List $119, Now $75
Understanding Radar: The ABCs of How Radar Systems… Arnold Acker, 2009, List $99, Now $29
Theory of Edge Diffraction in Electromagnetics… Pyotr Ufimtsev, 2009, List $99, Now $69
Advances in Bistatic Radar Willis & Griffiths, 2007, List $149, Now $99
Design of Multi-Frequency CW Radars Mohinder Jankariman, 2007, List $129, Now $89
Radar Cross Section Measurements Eugene F. Knott, 2006, List $115, Now $69
Bistatic Radar, 2nd Edition Nicholas J. Willis, 2005, List $89, Now $39
Radar Foundations for Imaging and Advanced Concepts Roger Sullivan, 2004, List $105, Now $69
Radar Principles for the Non-Specialist, 3rd Ed. Toomay & Hannen, 2004, List $59, Now $39
Airborne Early Warning System Concepts, 3rd Ed. Maurice Long, 2004, List $115, Now $45
Introduction to RF Stealth David Lynch, Jr., 2004, List $139, Now $39
Radar Cross Section, 2nd Ed. Knott et al, 2004, List $109, Now $69
Radar Detection DiFranco & Rubin, 2004, List $115, Now $59
Understanding Synthetic Aperture Radar Images Oliver & Quegan, 2004, List $109, Now $59
Low Angle Radar Land Clutter Billingsley, 2002, List $149, Now $79
Understanding Radar Systems Kingsley & Quegan, List $85, Now $39
Save Now – Antennas

Antennas: Fundamentals, Design, Measurement, 3rd Ed.

Blake & Long, 2009, List $99, Now $79

Antennas: Deluxe Edition with MathCad 14.0 Blake & Long, 2009, List $149, Now $119 This is the same book inside as the above listed title, just with a full featured single-user MathCad included (that’s HUGE savings on this software).

Microstrip and Printed Antennas, 2nd Ed.

Randy Bancroft, 2009, List $99, Now $69

Introduction to Antenna Fundamentals (CD)

Steven Best, 2004, List $129, Now $29

Introduction to Antennas (3 CD Set) Steven Best, 2004, List $297, Now $145

The above CD “Intro to Antenna Fundamentals” is included in this set of 3 CDs. Do not purchase both 🙂

Antenna Design and Visualization Using MATLAB 2.0 Elsherbeni & Inman, 2009, List $89, Now $59

Save Now – Electronic Warfare
Introduction to Electronic Defense Systems, 2nd Ed. Filippo Neri, 2006, List $109, Now $69
James Tsui, 2004, List $109, Now $59
Microwave Passive Direction Finding Stephen Lipsky, 2004, List $95, Now $49
Prices are only good until October 31.  We’ll have more titles to share next week!