Apollo 11- Remembering the “Great Leap for Mankind” 50 Years Later.

In May 1961, President John F. Kennedy issued a challenge to the nation to have a U.S. manned mission land on the moon within a decade. With the Cold War ongoing and the Soviets leading in space efforts, Kennedy’s call served to unite America’s best and brightest scientists and engineers and to invigorate the space […]

In May 1961, President John F. Kennedy issued a challenge to the nation to have a U.S. manned mission land on the moon within a decade. With the Cold War ongoing and the Soviets leading in space efforts, Kennedy’s call served to unite America’s best and brightest scientists and engineers and to invigorate the space dreams of the American people. The challenges in this endeavor meant that thousands of engineers, scientists and technicians would have to develop, create and test concepts and equipment that did not yet exist.

While mankind will always remember Neal Armstrong’s famous words and the names of the three Apollo 11 astronauts, what should not be forgotten is the remarkable achievements of the thousands of those who remained behind the scenes working and creating to bring about the ultimate success of the mission. All of NASA’s great achievements are and will continue to be the result of NASA employees and their dedicated and tireless work.

The Apollo 11 mission was the “proof of concept” mission that proved that NASA, with a dedicated country behind it, could achieve the “impossible”. The mission not only expanded our hopes, dreams and expectations but demonstrated our need for more NASA personnel engaged in all aspects of aerospace pursuits.

What must be remembered is that the moon landing was the culmination of many years of space efforts by NASA, building on the advances of prior space programs and achievements. Thousands of NASA pioneers worked on space programs such as Project Mercury, the first of NASA’s man-in-space programs and the Gemini Mission.

Fifty years ago, space technology was still in its infancy. The Apollo spacecraft computers that enabled men to walk on the moon had less processing power than that of a modern cellphone. So much progress has been made since that time, largely as a result of NASA’s commitment and the brilliant work of its dedicated personnel, that space exploration opportunities are now endless. Only imagination, training and funding are needed to reach new goals.

Apollo 11 launched from Cape Kennedy on July 16, 1969, carrying Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin into history. Millions of people were glued to television sets as Armstrong’s first step on the moon was televised live on July 20, 1969. “One small step for (a) man, one giant leap for mankind” became one of space histories most famous quotations even though there is confusion as to the actual quote. Armstrong states that he said, “one small step for a man, while most heard “for man”. Either way, it was most certainly a great leap forward for mankind.

Space exploration is still the realm of unbounded opportunities. Space News provides several articles in their July 15, 2019 issue.
https://www.sciencenews.org/article/apollo-moon-landing-anniversary-books

A list of all the Space Related Courses offered by ATI can be found at
https://aticourses.com/catalog_of_all_ATI_courses.htm#space

The current schedule is at
https://aticourses.com/schedule.html#spaceSatellite

If you remember the Apollo landings, What effect did they have on your life and career choices? Please add your comments.

Continue reading “Apollo 11- Remembering the “Great Leap for Mankind” 50 Years Later.”

New Horizons’ Best-Yet Detailed View of Ultima Thule

The best-yet image of Ultima Thule taken by the wide-angle Multicolor Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) is now online. The image shows a large circular depression, and many smaller depressions. These were not visible in the earlier, lower resolution image. Ultima Thule measures approximately 30 kilometers (18 miles) in diameter, and is irregularly shaped. Even better […]

The best-yet image of Ultima Thule taken by the wide-angle Multicolor Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) is now online. The image shows a large circular depression, and many smaller depressions. These were not visible in the earlier, lower resolution image. Ultima Thule measures approximately 30 kilometers (18 miles) in diameter, and is irregularly shaped. Even better future images are expected.

The principal investigator, Alan Stern, as well as eight other systems designers, teach Spacecraft Design courses for the Applied Technology Institute (ATI or ATIcourses). If you are working in Space and Spacecraft it is good to take classes and learn from real-world experts who have designed and operated successful spacecraft. Why not learn from the best? Click on this blog post to see the New Horizons designers and the specific classes that they teach.

https://aticourses.com/blog/index.php/2018/12/19/new-horizons-spacecraft-approaches-ultima-thule/

Applied Technology Institute has been following the New Horizons Mission to Pluto for years (since launch in 2006). Now New Horizons continued to the Kuiper Belt object (KBO) nicknamed MU69 Ultima Thule. New Horizons fly past and imaged the Ultima Thule on January 1, 2019. High-resolution images are only now being transmitted back and released to the public.

The best source for these images is http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/News-Article.php
This link provides an ongoing source of featured images.

http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/Galleries/Featured-Images/index.php

New Horizons is approximately 4.13 billion miles (6.64 billion kilometers) from Earth, operating normally and speeding away from the Sun (and Ultima Thule) at more than 31,500 miles (50,700 kilometers) per hour. At that distance, a radio signal reaches Earth six hours and nine minutes after leaving the spacecraft.

Recall That Curiosity Rover Was Delivered to Mars by an ATLAS Rocket in 2011

There are so many Space Exploration Missions that are on the front page of the papers now, New Horizons for example.  Let us not forget about ongoing missions that are no longer getting as much publicity at they may deserve, JPL Mars Science Lab Curiosity Rover Mission for example.The Curiosity Rover Mission was launched in […]

There are so many Space Exploration Missions that are on the front page of the papers now, New Horizons for example.  Let us not forget about ongoing missions that are no longer getting as much publicity at they may deserve, JPL Mars Science Lab Curiosity Rover Mission for example.

The Curiosity Rover Mission was launched in November 2011 for an 8-month trip to Mars.  Once on Mars, the Curiosity Mission was expected to last 2 years.  Amazingly, the Curiosity Rover Mission is still in progress, and periodic updates on the status of that mission are still being posted at https://mars.nasa.gov/msl/mission/mars-rover-curiosity-mission-updates/

The success of that mission did not start when the Rover started sending back amazing pictures from Mars.  The success of that mission started when the Rocket and Launch Vehicle propelled Rover into Space.    The Atlas V-541 Rocket selected for this mission and built by Boeing Corp and Lockheed Martin Corp.  performed as designed.  If it had not performed as well as it did, the entire mission could have been in jeopardy.  Rockets and Launch Vehicles are truly acritical component of every mission.

ATI is offering a Course on Rocket and Launch Vehicles in Columbia, Maryland from February 11 to 14, 2019.  The course is being taught by Edward Keith, a multi-discipline Launch Vehicle System Engineer, specializing in integration of launch vehicle technology, design, modeling and business strategies.  There is still time to enroll in this class, and you will be finished in time to get home for dinner on Valentine’s day! 

Please consider learning more about this ATI offering, and enroll in the ATI class, by going to https://aticourses.com/rockets_launch_vehicles.html

 

New Horizons: Watch the Ultima Thule Flyby —- In-Depth Coverage Starts Dec 31

On New Year’s Day, the New Horizons spacecraft, which flew past Pluto in 2015, will be making another flyby. NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft has been whizzing toward Ultima Thule ever since it completed its primary mission: the historic Pluto flyby of July 2015. The overall trip was 13 years and 4 Billion miles. NASA estimates […]

On New Year’s Day, the New Horizons spacecraft, which flew past Pluto in 2015, will be making another flyby. NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft has been whizzing toward Ultima Thule ever since it completed its primary mission: the historic Pluto flyby of July 2015.

The overall trip was 13 years and 4 Billion miles. NASA estimates that the probe will arrive at its new destination at 12:33 A.M. Eastern time on New Year’s Day (01/01/2019) and engineers have devised a carefully-calculated trajectory to ensure it gets to Thule safely. This will be the most distant flyby ever conducted.

Follow the news at http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/Where-to-Watch.php

I have been personally inspired by the success of the New Horizons’ mission. I was present at JHU/APL for the July 2015 Pluto flyby and briefings. Many of the New Horizons engineers continue to teach ATI engineering and science training courses based on their first-hand real-world experience. This has been a high success, 13-year project that may continue to other new objects as the spacecraft is healthy and still performing well. I hope so.

See their information at
https://aticourses.com/blog/index.php/2018/12/19/new-horizons-spacecraft-approaches-ultima-thule/

Information Timeline ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Date Time Event
31 Monday December, 2018
2:00-3:00 pm EST Press briefing: Ultima Thule flyby science and operations preview. Panelists include Alan Stern, New Horizons principal investigator, Southwest Research Institute; Helene Winters, New Horizons project manager, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory; John Spencer, New Horizons deputy project scientist, Southwest Research Institute; Frederic Pelletier, navigation team lead, KinetX, Inc.

3:00-4:00 pm EST Q&A: Ask the New Horizons Team. Questions from social media (#askNewHorizons) answered by Alex Parker, New Horizons co-investigator, Southwest Research Institute; Kelsi Singer, co-investigator, Southwest Research Institute; Gabe Rogers, New Horizons deputy mission systems engineer, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory

8:00-11:00 pm EST Panel discussion on the exploration of small worlds (8-9 pm); Ultima Thule flyby countdown events; mission updates

1 Tuesday January, 2019
12:02 am EST Global song release: Brian May, New Horizons contributing scientist and Queen guitarist, “New Horizons (Ultima Thule Mix)”

12:15-12:45 am EST Live coverage of countdown to closest approach (12:33 am); real-time flyby simulations

10:15 – 10:45 am EST Live coverage of New Horizons signal-acquisition activities in the Mission Operations Center, confirming spacecraft status and flyby success

11:30 am– 12:30 pm EST Press briefing: Spacecraft status, latest images and data download schedule. Panelists include Alan Stern, New Horizons principal investigator, Southwest Research Institute; Alice Bowman, New Horizons mission operations manager, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory; Hal Weaver, New Horizons project scientist, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory; Chris Hersman, New Horizons mission systems engineer, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory.

2 Wednesday January, 2019
2:00-3:00 pm EST Press briefing: Science results from Ultima Thule.Panelists include Alan Stern, New Horizons principal investigator, Southwest Research Institute; Jeff Moore, New Horizons co-investigator, NASA Ames Research Center; Cathy Olkin, New Horizons deputy project scientist, Southwest Research Institute; Will Grundy, New Horizons co-investigator, Lowell Observatory.

3 Thursday January, 2019
2:00-3:00 pm EST Press briefing: Science results from Ultima Thule.Panelists TBD.

Previous articles about New Horizons on ATI’s website.

Related blog post:
1. https://aticourses.com/blog/index.php/2018/12/19/new-horizons-spacecraft-approaches-ultima-thule/
2. NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft is 15.96 astronomical units (about 2.39 billion kilometers, or 1.48 billion miles) from the Sun
3. NASA New Horizons spacecraft on the way to rendezvous with planet Pluto
4. The New Horizons Mission to Pluto–Ten Experts Who Worked Behind-the-Scenes On the New Horizons Mission and Who Teach for ATIcourses.
5. New Horizons: Recollections of Ground System Engineer, Steve Gemeny
6. New Horizons – This was almost a disaster, but was saved by knowledgeable scientists.
7. New Horizons Flyover of Pluto

It Will Be Historic: New Horizons Team Prepares for January 1, 2019 Flyby of Kuiper Belt Ultima Thule

Applied Technology Institute (ATI or ATIcourses) has been following the New Horizons Mission to Pluto for years (since launch in 2006). Now New Horizons is on to the Kuiper Belt object (KBO) nicknamed Ultima Thule. New Horizons will fly past and image the Ultima Thule on January 1, 2019. Several of ATI instructors have been […]

Applied Technology Institute (ATI or ATIcourses) has been following the New Horizons Mission to Pluto for years (since launch in 2006). Now New Horizons is on to the Kuiper Belt object (KBO) nicknamed Ultima Thule. New Horizons will fly past and image the Ultima Thule on January 1, 2019.

Several of ATI instructors have been lead scientists for the New Horizons mission. If you are working in Space and Spacecraft it is good to take classes and learn from real-world experts who have designed and operated successful spacecraft.

This is a good article to keep you up to date.
https://www.space.com/42252-new-horizons-team-ultima-thule-flyby.html?

If you have interest ATI can send you updates in on our blog and our newsletter.
https://secure.campaigner.com/CSB/Public/Form.aspx

Background

New Horizons is a space probe launched by NASA on 19 January 2006, to the dwarf planet Pluto and on an escape trajectory from the Sun. It is the first man-made spacecraft to go to Pluto. Its flight took eight years. It arrived at the Pluto–Charon system on July 14, 2015. It flew near Pluto and took photographs and measurements while it passed. At about 1 kilobit per second, it took 15 months to transmit them back to Earth.

ATI instructors who helped plan, develop and engineer the New Horizons Mission. These include the following engineers and scientists, with their bios and links to their related ATI courses.

1. Dr. Alan Stern https://aticourses.com/planetary_science.htm

Dr. Alan Stern is a planetary scientist, space program executive, aerospace consultant, and author. In 2010, he was elected to be the President and CEO of The Golden Spike Company, a commercial space corporation planning human lunar expeditions. Additionally, since 2009, he has been an Associate Vice President at the Southwest Research Institute, and since 2008 has had his own aerospace consulting practice.
Dr. Stern is the Principal Investigator (PI) of NASA’s $720M New Horizon’s Pluto-Kuiper Belt mission, the largest PI-led space mission ever launched by NASA. New Horizons launched in 2006 and arrived on July 14, 2015. Dr. Stern is also the PI of two instruments aboard New Horizons, the Alice UV spectrometer and the Ralph Visible Imager/IR Spectrometer.

2. Eric Hoffman
https://aticourses.com/effective_design_reviews.htm
https://aticourses.com/spacecraft_quality.htm

Eric Hoffman has designed space-borne communications and navigation equipment and performed systems engineering on many APL satellites and communications systems. He has authored over 60 papers and holds 8 patents in these fields. Mr. Hoffman was involved in the proposal (as well as several prior Pluto mission concepts). He chaired the major system-level design reviews (and now teaches the course Effective Design Reviews). He was Space Department Chief Engineer during the concept, design, fabrication, and test of New Horizons. His still actively consulting in the field. He is an Associate Fellow of the AIAA and coauthor of the leading textbook Fundamentals of Space Systems

3. Chris DeBoy https://aticourses.com/Satellite_Communications_Design_Engineering.htm

Chris DeBoy leads the RF Engineering Group in the Space Department at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, and is a member of APL’s Principal Professional Staff. He has over 20 years of experience in satellite communications, from systems engineering (he is the lead RF communications engineer for the New Horizons Mission to Pluto) to flight hardware design for both Low-Earth orbit and deep-space missions. He holds a BSEE from Virginia Tech, a Master’s degree in Electrical Engineering from Johns Hopkins, and teaches the satellite communications course for the Johns Hopkins University.

4. Dr. Mark E. Pittelkau https://aticourses.com/attitude_determination.htm

Dr. Pittelkau was previously with the Applied Physics Laboratory, Orbital Sciences Corporation, CTA Space Systems (now Orbital), and Swales Aerospace. His experience in satellite systems covers all phases of design and operation, including conceptual design, implementation, and testing of attitude control systems, attitude and orbit determination, and attitude sensor alignment and calibration, control-structure interaction analysis, stability and jitter analysis, and post-launch support. His current interests are precision attitude determination, attitude sensor calibration, orbit determination, and optimization of attitude maneuvers. Dr. Pittelkau earned the B.S. and Ph. D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Tennessee Technological University and the M.S. degree in EE from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

5. Douglas Mehoke (and others) https://aticourses.com/spacecraft_thermal_control.htm

Douglas Mehoke is the Assistant Group Supervisor and Technology Manager for the Mechanical System Group in the Space Department at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. He has worked in the field of spacecraft and instrument thermal design for 30 years, and has a wide background in the fields of heat transfer and fluid mechanics. He has been the lead thermal engineer on a variety spacecraft and scientific instruments, including MSX, CONTOUR, and New Horizons. He is presently the Technical Lead for the development of the Solar Probe Plus Thermal Protection System. He was the original thermal engineer for New Horizons, the mechanical system engineer, and is currently the spacecraft damage lead for the flyby Hazard Team. Other JHU/APL are currently teaching the Spacecraft Thermal Control course.

6. Steven Gemeny https://aticourses.com/ground_systems_design.htm

Steve Gemeny is a Principal Program Engineer and a former Senior Member of the Professional Staff at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, where he served as Ground Station Lead for the TIMED mission to explore Earth’s atmosphere and Lead Ground System Engineer on the New Horizons mission to explore Pluto by 2020. Mr. Gemeny is an experienced professional in the field of Ground Station and Ground System design in both the commercial world and on NASA Science missions with a wealth of practical knowledge spanning nearly three decades. Mr. Gemeny delivers his experiences and knowledge to his ATIcourses’ students with an informative and entertaining presentation style. Mr Gemeny is Director Business Development at Syntonics LLC, working in RF over fiber product enhancement, new application development for RF over fiber technology, oversight of advanced DOD SBIR/STTR research and development activities related to wireless sensors and software defined antennas.

7. John Penn https://aticourses.com/fundamentals_of_RF_engineering.html

John Penn is currently the Team Lead for RFIC Design at Army Research Labs. Previously, he was a full-time engineer at the Applied Physics Laboratory for 26 years where he contributed to the New Horizons Mission. He joined the Army Research Laboratory in 2008. Since 1989, he has been a part-time professor at Johns Hopkins University where he teaches RF & Microwaves I & II, MMIC Design, and RFIC Design. He received a B.E.E. from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1980, an M.S. (EE) from Johns Hopkins University (JHU) in 1982, and a second M.S. (CS) from JHU in 1988.

8. Timothy Cole
https://aticourses.com/space_based_lasers.htm
https://aticourses.com/Tactical_Intelligence_Surveillance_Reconnaissance_System_Engineering.htm
https://aticourses.com/Wireless_Sensor_Networking.htm

Timothy Cole is a leading authority with 30 years of experience exclusively working in electro-optical systems as a system and design engineer. While at Applied Physics Laboratory for 21 years, Tim was awarded the NASA Achievement Award in connection with the design, development, and operation of the Near-Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) Laser Radar and was also the initial technical lead for the New Horizons LOng-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI instrument). He has presented technical papers addressing space-based laser altimetry all over the US and Europe. His industry experience has been focused on the systems engineering and analysis associated development of optical detectors, wireless ad hoc remote sensing, exoatmospheric sensor design and now leads ICESat-2 ATLAS altimeter calibration effort.

9. Jay Jenkins https://aticourses.com/spacecraft_solar_arrays.htm

Jay Jenkins is a Systems Engineer in the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate at NASA and an Associate Fellow of the AIAA. His 24-year aerospace career provided many years of experience in design, analysis, and test of aerospace power systems, solar arrays, and batteries. His career has afforded him opportunities for hands-on fabrication and testing, concurrent with his design responsibilities. He was recognized as a winner of the ASME International George Westinghouse Silver Medal for his development of the first solar arrays beyond Mars’ orbit and the first solar arrays to orbit the planet, Mercury. He was recognized with two Best Paper Awards in the area of Aerospace Power Systems.
See some of ATI’s earlier blog posts
https://aticourses.com/blog/index.php/tag/douglas-mehoke/
https://aticourses.com/blog/index.php/tag/mission-operations-center-at-apl/

What was it exactly? Space history’s most fascinating misquote.

This is an interesting article. What was it exactly? History’s most fascinating misquote. “Houston, we have a problem’: The amazing history of the iconic Apollo 13 misquote. https://www.washingtonpost.com/podcasts/retropod/historys-most-fascinating-misquote/ To me, the differences are small, especially since the problem was not resolved at the time of the radio message,and could have lead to the death of […]

This is an interesting article. What was it exactly? History’s most fascinating misquote.

“Houston, we have a problem’: The amazing history of the iconic Apollo 13 misquote.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/podcasts/retropod/historys-most-fascinating-misquote/

To me, the differences are small, especially since the problem was not resolved at the time of the radio message,
and could have lead to the death of the 3 astronauts.

“Houston, we have a problem’

and “Houston, we had a problem’ (That was apparently what was actually said).

If you want to know more about Space and Satellite Design, go to
https://aticourses.com/catalog_of_all_ATI_courses.htm#space

If you want more history od Apollo 13, see
https://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/pao/History/apollo/apo13hist.html

28th Annual INCOSE International Symposium July 7 – July 12, 2018 In Washington DC

INCOSE’s Annual International Symposium is the largest annual gathering of people who do systems engineering for four days of presentations, case studies, workshops, tutorials and panel discussions. The program attracts an international mix of professionals at all levels, and includes practitioners in government and industry, as well as educators and researchers. https://www.incose.org/symp2018/home ATIcouses has more […]
INCOSE’s Annual International Symposium is the largest annual gathering of people who do systems engineering for four days of presentations, case studies, workshops, tutorials and panel discussions. The program attracts an international mix of professionals at all levels, and includes practitioners in government and industry, as well as educators and researchers. https://www.incose.org/symp2018/home ATIcouses has more than 50 courses in Systems Engineering. See https://aticourses.com/catalog_of_all_ATI_courses.htm#systems

My Name Is Going to the Sun! What About Yours?

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe — designed, built and managed by Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) — will launch in summer 2018 and travel to our star on a historic mission to “touch the Sun.” Now you can get on board and be a part of this voyage of extreme exploration. NASA is giving everyone […]
Capture2CaptureNASA’s Parker Solar Probe — designed, built and managed by Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) — will launch in summer 2018 and travel to our star on a historic mission to “touch the Sun.” Now you can get on board and be a part of this voyage of extreme exploration. NASA is giving everyone across the world the opportunity to submit their names for a journey to the Sun. Names will be added to a microchip that will fly aboard Parker Solar Probe as it makes its way from Earth to the Sun — the first mission to ever do so. Along for the ride will be a revolutionary heat shield, which will protect the spacecraft from soaring temperatures as it plunges into the corona to get the first close-up view of Earth’s star. Name submissions will be accepted until April 27, 2018. Learn more and add your name to the mission here: http://go.nasa.gov/HotTicket. Contact me for more information at jim.jenkins@aticourses.com Also, see http://parkersolarprobe.jhuapl.edu/index.php#newscenter

Earth from the ISS HDEV cameras aboard the International Space Station.

Nice live steaming video with soothing background music. Earth from the ISS HDEV cameras aboard the International Space Station. Watch the earth roll by courtesy of the ISS cameras (2016). Captured by ISS HDEV cameras on board the International Space Station.
Nice live steaming video with soothing background music. Earth from the ISS HDEV cameras aboard the International Space Station. Watch the earth roll by courtesy of the ISS cameras (2016). Captured by ISS HDEV cameras on board the International Space Station.

How to Promote Your ATI Course in Social Media

How to Promote Your ATI Course in Social Media LinkedIn for ATI Rocket Scientists   Did you know that for 52% of professionals and executives, their LinkedIn profile is the #1 or #2 search result when someone searches on their name? For ATI instructors, that number is substantially lower – just 17%. One reason is […]
How to Promote Your ATI Course in Social Media LinkedIn for ATI Rocket Scientists   Did you know that for 52% of professionals and executives, their LinkedIn profile is the #1 or #2 search result when someone searches on their name? For ATI instructors, that number is substantially lower – just 17%. One reason is that about 25% of ATI instructors do not have a LinkedIn profile. Others have done so little with their profile that it isn’t included in the first page of search results. If you are not using your LinkedIn profile, you are missing a huge opportunity. When people google you, your LinkedIn profile is likely the first place they go to learn about you. You have little control over what other information might be available on the web about you. But you have complete control over your LinkedIn profile. You can use your profile to tell your story – to give people the exact information you want them to have about your expertise and accomplishments.   Why not take advantage of that to promote your company, your services, and your course? Here are some simple ways to promote your course using LinkedIn… On Your LinkedIn Profile Let’s start by talking about how to include your course on your LinkedIn profile so it is visible anytime someone googles you or visits your profile. 1. Add your role as an instructor. Let people know that this course is one of the ways you share your knowledge. You can include your role as an instructor in several places on your profile:
  • Experience – This is the equivalent of listing your role as a current job. (You can have more than one current job.) Use Applied Technology Institute as the employer. Make sure you drag and drop this role below your full-time position.
  • Summary – Your summary is like a cover letter for your profile – use it to give people an overview of who you are and what you do. You can mention the type of training you do, along with the name of your course.
  • Projects – The Projects section gives you an excellent way to share the course without giving it the same status as a full-time job.
  • Headline – Your Headline comes directly below your name, at the top of your profile. You could add “ATI Instructor” at the end of your current Headline.
Start with an introduction, such as “I teach an intensive course through the Applied Technology Institute on [course title]” and copy/paste the description from your course materials or the ATI website. You can add a link to the course description on the ATI website. This example from Tom Logsdon’s profile, shows how you might phrase it:   Here are some other examples of instructors who include information about their courses on their LinkedIn profile:
  • Buddy Wellborn – His Headline says “Instructor at ATI” and Buddy includes details about the course in his Experience section.
  • D. Lee Fugal – Mentions the course in his Summary and Experience.
  • Jim Jenkins – Courses are included throughout Jim’s profile, including his Headline, Summary, Experience, Projects, and Courses.
  • 2. Link to your course page.
In the Contact Info section of your LinkedIn profile, you can link out to three websites. To add your course, go to Edit Profile, then click on Contact Info (just below your number of connections, next to a Rolodex card icon). Click on the pencil icon to the right of Websites to add a new site. Choose the type of website you are adding. The best option is “Other:” as that allows you to insert your own name for the link. You have 35 characters – you can use a shortened version of your course title or simply “ATI Course.” Then copy/paste the link to the page about your course. This example from Jim Jenkins’ profile shows how a customized link looks:   3. Upload course materials. You can upload course materials to help people better understand the content you cover. You could include PowerPoint presentations (from this course or other training), course handouts (PDFs), videos or graphics. They can be added to your Summary, Experience or Project. You can see an example of an upload above, in Tom Logsdon’s profile. 4. Add skills related to your course. LinkedIn allows you to include up to 50 skills on your profile. If your current list of skills doesn’t include the topics you cover in your course, you might want to add them. Go to the Skills & Endorsements section on your Edit Profile page, then click on Add skill. Start typing and let LinkedIn auto-complete your topic. If your exact topic isn’t included in the suggestions, you can add it. 5. Ask students for recommendations. Are you still in touch with former students who were particularly appreciative of the training you provided in your course? You might want to ask them for a recommendation that you can include on your profile. Here are some tips on asking for recommendations from LinkedIn expert Viveka Von Rosen. 6. Use an exciting background graphic. You can add an image at the top of your profile – perhaps a photo of you teaching the course, a photo of your course materials, a graphic from your presentation, or simply some images related to your topic. You can see an example on Val Traver’s profile. Go to Edit Profile, then run your mouse over the top of the page (just above your name). You will see the option to Edit Background. Click there and upload your image. The ideal size is 1400 pixels by 425. LinkedIn prefers a JPG, PNG or GIF. Of course, only upload an image that you have permission to use.   Share News about Your Course You can also use LinkedIn to attract more attendees to your course every time you teach. 7. When a course date is scheduled, share the news as a status update. This lets your connections know that you are teaching a course – it’s a great way to reach the people who are most likely to be interested and able to make referrals. Go to your LinkedIn home page, and click on the box under your photo that says “Share an update.” Copy and paste the URL of the page on the ATI website that has the course description. Once the section below populates with the ATI Courses logo and the course description, delete the URL. Replace it with a comment such as: “Looking forward to teaching my next course on [title] for @Applied Technology Institute on [date] at [location].” Note that when you finish typing “@Applied Technology Institute” it will give you the option to click on the company name. When you do that ATI will know you are promoting the course, and will be deeply grateful! When people comment on your update, it’s nice to like their comment or reply with a “Thank you!” message. Their comment shares the update with their network, so they are giving your course publicity. If you want to start doing more with status updates, here are some good tips about what to share (and what not to share) from LinkedIn expert Kim Garst. 8. Share the news in LinkedIn Groups. If you have joined any LinkedIn Groups in your areas of expertise, share the news there too. Of course, in a Group you want to phrase the message a little differently. Instead of “Looking forward to teaching…” you might say “Registration is now open for…” or “For everyone interested in [topic], I’m teaching…” You could also ask a thought-provoking question on one of the topics you cover. Here are some tips about how to start an interesting discussion in a LinkedIn Group. 9. Post again if you still have seats available. If the course date is getting close and you are looking for more people to register, you should post again. The text below will work as a status update and in most LinkedIn Groups. “We still have several seats open for my course on [title] on [date] at [location]. If you know of anyone who might be interested, could you please forward this? Thanks. ” “We have had a few last-minute cancellations for my course on [title] on [date] at [location]. Know anyone who might be interested in attending?” 10. Blog about the topic of the course. When you publish blog posts on LinkedIn using their publishing platform, you get even more exposure than with a status update:
  • The blog posts are pushed out to all your connections.
  • They stay visible on your LinkedIn profile, and
  • They are made available to Google and other search engines.
A blog post published on LinkedIn will rank higher than one posted elsewhere, because LinkedIn is such an authority site. So this can give your course considerable exposure. You probably have written articles or have other content relevant to the course. Pick something that is 750-1500 words. To publish it, go to your LinkedIn home page, and click on the link that says “Publish a post.” The interface is very simple – easier than using Microsoft Word. Include an image if you can. You probably have something in your training materials that will be perfect. At the end of the post, add a sentence that says: “To learn more, attend my course on [title].” Link the title to the course description on the ATI website. For more tips about blogging, you are welcome to join ProResource’s online training website. The How to Write Blog Posts for LinkedIn course is free. Take the first step The most important version of your bio in the digital world is your LinkedIn summary. If you only make one change as a result of reading this blog post, it should be to add a strong summary to your LinkedIn profile. Write the summary promoting yourself as an expert in your field, not as a job seeker. Here are some resources that can help: Write the first draft of your profile in a word processing program to spell-check and ensure you are within the required character counts. Then copy/paste it into the appropriate sections of your LinkedIn profile. You will have a stronger profile that tells your story effectively with just an hour or two of work! Contributed by guest blogger Judy Schramm. Schramm is the CEO of ProResource, a marketing agency that works with thought leaders to help them create a powerful and effective presence in social media. ProResource offers done-for-you services as well as social media executive coaching. Contact Judy Schramm at jschramm@proresource.com or 703-824-8482.  

You decide – The Best Technical Training for You!

    You can make a difference. Applied Technology Institute is scheduling new courses for September 2016 through July 2017. Please let us know which courses you would like to see on our schedule or brought to your facility. ·         If you have a group of 3 or more people, ATI can schedule an open enrollment course in […]
    You can make a difference. Applied Technology Institute is scheduling new courses for September 2016 through July 2017. Please let us know which courses you would like to see on our schedule or brought to your facility. ·         If you have a group of 3 or more people, ATI can schedule an open enrollment course in your geographic area. ·         If you have a group of 8 or more, ATI can schedule a course on-site at your facility. On-site training brings our experts to you — on your schedule, at your location. It also allows us to plan your training in advance and tailor classes directly to your needs. You can help identify courses to suit your training needs and bring the best short courses to you! ATI courses can help you stay up-to-date with today’s rapidly changing technology. Boost your career. Courses are led by world-class design experts. Learn from the proven best. ATI courses by technical area: Satellites & Space-Related courses Acoustic & Sonar Engineering courses Engineering & Data Analysis courses Radar, Missiles and Combat Systems courses Project Management and Systems Engineering courses ______________________________________________________________________________________________ Contact us: ATI@ATIcourses.com or (410) 956-8805
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New Horizons – This was almost a disaster, but was saved by knowledgeable scientists.

The people in the Mission Operations Center — “the MOC” — had been tracking NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft for 9½ years as it journeyed the breadth of the solar system. It was just 10 days away from the dwarf planet Pluto when, at 1:55 p.m. on July 4, it vanished. The disappearance of the spacecraft […]
The people in the Mission Operations Center — “the MOC” — had been tracking NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft for 9½ years as it journeyed the breadth of the solar system. It was just 10 days away from the dwarf planet Pluto when, at 1:55 p.m. on July 4, it vanished. The disappearance of the spacecraft challenged the New Horizons team to perform at its highest level and under the greatest of deadline pressures. They did work efficiently and saved the mission. We all wish the New Horizons team the best as they approach the busiest time of the fly-by encounter. I have known and respected many of the engineers and scientist for more than 20 years and am happy to praise their skills. The nature of the New Horizons mission did not permit any wiggle room, any delays, any do-overs, because it was a flyby. The spacecraft had one shot at Pluto, tightly scheduled: When it vanished, New Horizons was going about 32,000 miles per hour and on track to make its closest pass to Pluto, about 7,800 miles, at precisely 7:49 a.m. July 14. But as the New Horizons team gathered in the control room on July 4, no one knew whether their spacecraft was still alive.   Because New Horizons is so far away, it takes 4 1/2 hours for a one-way message between the spacecraft and the MOC. That means whatever happened to New Horizons on July 4 had actually happened 4 1/2 hours before the people in Mission Operations knew about it.   The team figured out what had gone wrong. The spacecraft’s main computer had been compressing new scientific data for downloading much later. At the same time, it was supposed to execute some previously uploaded commands. It got overloaded; the spacecraft has an “autonomy” system that can decide what to do if something’s not quite right. That system decided to switch from the main to the backup computer and go into safe mode. Read more at http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/the-inside-story-of-new-horizons-apollo-13-moment-on-its-way-to-pluto/2015/07/10/fb361248-25ad-11e5-b72c-2b7d516e1e0e_story.html Additional information about the start of the New Horizons mission and the key roles played by ATI instructors who worked (and are still working) on the New Horizons mission see https://aticourses.com/blog/index.php/2015/06/30/the-new-horizons-mission-to-plutoten-experts-who-worked-behind-the-scenes-on-the-new-horizons-mission-and-who-teach-for-aticourses/ https://aticourses.com/blog/index.php/2015/07/09/new-horizons-recollections-of-ground-system-engineer-steve-gemeny/

New Horizons: Recollections of Ground System Engineer, Steve Gemeny

When we think about the ground system on a space mission we tend to consider all the systems associated with commanding, receiving and archiving telemetry, and all the communications systems and equipment that makes that all work.  We plan contingencies, and redundancies, we back up everything in multiple formats, and on long duration missions like […]
This image of Pluto from New Horizons’ Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) was received on July 8, and has been combined with lower-resolution color information from the Ralph instrument.

When we think about the ground system on a space mission we tend to consider all the systems associated with commanding, receiving and archiving telemetry, and all the communications systems and equipment that makes that all work.  We plan contingencies, and redundancies, we back up everything in multiple formats, and on long duration missions like New Horizons someone eventually has to address “how are we going to keep all that stuff on the ground running for 10 – 20 years”-  and produces a Longevity Plan.

But once everything is all setup, and operational, and all the staff are at their stations on launch day – having already given the first “Go For Launch” pole responses with 5 hours till launch – You have to wonder, did anyone ever consider what to do if the entire JHU/APL campus goes dark!

No one had.  And with a newly installed cutover for the main (PEPCO) power feed providing an automatic transfer to a backup (BGE) feed  no one expected to ever need the capability, let alone that it would failed to transfer.  It did- at about 5:30 am on launch day while I was on console at KSC.  The rapid application of backup generators to sustain the Mission Operations Center at APL only solved half of the issues…  Network switches and routers were scattered across campus, most only running on UPS Power until that failed too… there was no cooling air to keep everything operating within normal temperatures on January 18, 2006…  Things were going from bad to worse and the Mission System Engineer was heard to say “  I’ve seen how quickly a Launch day can get deep into the contingency  plan, I’m not starting a launch when we are already this deep into solving unplanned contingencies”. This resulted in the launch being scrubbed and resumed on January 19th after power and environmental control systems were restored campus wide at APL.

Fortunately, I spent the time that afternoon to write the whole thing up in case I was asked to give a report, I’ve got pictures of generators outside Building 13, with external air handlers and chillers hosed up to blowers and leaks flooding the hallways…  It was a ZOO!.  I was safe at KSC and we restarted the count for a successful launch on the 19th.

Steve Gemeny teaches Ground Systems Design & Operations https://aticourses.com/ground_systems_design.htm course for ATICourses.

Other scientists & engineers that worked on the New Horizons and also teach for ATI are:

1. Dr. Alan Stern https://aticourses.com/planetary_science.htm

2. Eric Hoffman

https://aticourses.com/effective_design_reviews.htm

https://aticourses.com/spacecraft_quality.htm

https://aticourses.com/satellite_rf_communications.htm

3. Chris DeBoy

https://aticourses.com/Satellite_Communications_Design_Engineering.htm

4. Dr. Mark E. Pittelkau https://aticourses.com/attitude_determination.htm

5. Douglas Mehoke https://aticourses.com/spacecraft_thermal_control.htm

6. John Penn https://aticourses.com/fundamentals_of_RF_engineering.html

7. Timothy Cole

https://aticourses.com/space_based_lasers.htm

https://aticourses.com/Tactical_Intelligence_Surveillance_Reconnaissance_System_Engineering.htm

https://aticourses.com/Wireless_Sensor_Networking.htm

8. Robert Moore https://aticourses.com/satellite_rf_communications.htm

9. Jay Jenkins https://aticourses.com/spacecraft_solar_arrays.htm

 

Read more

 


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Attend Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) Fundamentals (1-day) and the follow-on MBSE Applications courses (2-days)

My name is Zane Scott and I teach the Model-Based Systems Engineering courses for Applied Technology Institute (ATICourses).  I want to invite you the ATI’s Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) Fundamentals (1-day) and the follow-on MBSE Applications courses (2-days). The Model-Based Systems Engineering Fundamentals course includes discussion of real-life benefits from this approach versus the traditional […]
My name is Zane Scott and I teach the Model-Based Systems Engineering courses for Applied Technology Institute (ATICourses).  I want to invite you the ATI’s Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) Fundamentals (1-day) and the follow-on MBSE Applications courses (2-days). The Model-Based Systems Engineering Fundamentals course includes discussion of real-life benefits from this approach versus the traditional document-centric systems design methodology. The two-day follow-on class provides in-depth practical advice and case studies based on specific satellite and defense systems case studies.
Model-based Systems Engineering Fundamentals Aug 11, 2015 Columbia, MD
Model-based Systems Engineering (2 day) Aug 12-13, 2015 Columbia, MD
 
The benefits of MBSE from a program manager/sponsor perspective are emphasized in day 1, which is available as a stand-along course for Program Managers and other non-technical sponsors. The two-day follow-on class provides in-depth knowledge for the working systems engineer. These courses are practical and useful in managing complex systems design projects utilizing MBSE which promises to impact projects positively by improving communication among the team, promoting reuse (and associated cost/risk reduction), and maintaining traceability from the requirements through validation and verification. But are these promises fulfilled and results documented? Case studies are used to illustrate the practical benefits of MBSE.  MBSE was recently used on a student project at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University. The student team was so impressed by the effectiveness of this approach that they recorded a 2014 case study webinar. This success story is especially beneficial for Systems Engineering Managers seeking to clearly understand the Return on Investment from MBSE. Systems Engineering practitioners will appreciate the in-depth practical system design process outlined in day 2 and 3 of this course with reference to the CubeSat program case study. The Embry-Riddle EagleSat program took off in 2012 as part of NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative. The student-run, professor-guided organization has a goal of flying Embry-Riddle’s first satellite, a fully functioning 10-centimeter cube focused on analyzing the susceptibility of computer memory to solar radiation, while also mapping the body’s orbital decay over time.   The systems engineering effort, undertaken through the use of MBSE, has played a critical role in requirements management and maintaining design traceability throughout the development process and across all six subsystems. The choice to use MBSE comes from the approach’s inherent ability to document complex element relationships while easily and fully communicating these to other team members through generated reports and descriptive diagrams. Please consider attending either the 1-day Fundamentals class if you need an overview, or the full 3-day class to learn how to effectively apply MBSE to real-world, complex systems engineering projects.
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New INCOSE CSEP Handbook v4.0 to be Released! Pass the CSEP test Now!

New INCOSE Handbook – New CSEP Opportunities The newest INCOSE SE Handbook (version 4.0) is expected this month (June 2015). Now is a great time to plan for the CSEP/ASEP exam best suited to you, because the transition gives you a choice!. Insider Hint – Since the CSEP application process can be long and time […]
New INCOSE Handbook – New CSEP Opportunities The newest INCOSE SE Handbook (version 4.0) is expected this month (June 2015). Now is a great time to plan for the CSEP/ASEP exam best suited to you, because the transition gives you a choice!. Insider Hint – Since the CSEP application process can be long and time intensive, sign up first to become an ASPE. Once you pass the exam, you then can take your time to complete the more demanding CSEP application process. The Handbook was delayed to coincide with the recent release of ISO-15288. Now INCOSE will offer a transition period for you. From now through December 2015, the current exam will continue to be primary, based on Handbook v3.2.2. The new exam will become primary in January 2016 – but the new exam can also be available by special request as early as July. ATI matches the transition with our Certified Systems Engineering Professional (CSEP) Preparation course. You can still take our 2-day course based on Handbook v3.2.2 on July 7-8, 2015 in Chantilly, VA. Or you can expand your knowledge with our new 3-day version based on Handbook 4.0 on September 24-26 (and forward). The new course will cover the significant expansion in the new Handbook (another 50 pages!) and will also include more exercises and activities to help you “seal in” the knowledge for the exam. You can choose! Take the shorter course and get your ASEP/CSEP now, before the change – or take the longer course to get the full set of new knowledge and more learning activities. Either way, you advance your career by gaining the INCOSE certification!  
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Aegis Combat System Engineering and Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense Videos

This YouTube channel has several good video produced by Raytheon explaining their radar and Ballistic Missile Defense systems. ATIcourses has two courses that fully explain the Aegis Combat System and Aegis Ballistic Defense systems. These courses are offered as open enrollment public courses and customized onsite courses. Aegis Combat System Engineering Naval engagements can be […]
This YouTube channel has several good video produced by Raytheon explaining their radar and Ballistic Missile Defense systems. ATIcourses has two courses that fully explain the Aegis Combat System and Aegis Ballistic Defense systems. These courses are offered as open enrollment public courses and customized onsite courses.
  • Aegis Combat System Engineering
  • Naval engagements can be divided into three major functions: Detect, Control, Engage. The Aegis Combat System (ACS) is the first to tightly integrate, interlace, and overlap all three functions into one. The central integrating element of the ACS is the Aegis Weapon System (AWS) which is a multifunction radar and fire control system designed for the Navy’s anti-air warfare (AAW) mission of fleet defense. The system conducts AAW engagements, starting with surveillance and tracking by the SPY-1 radar; application of engagement doctrine by the Command and Control system; intercept calculation, weapon selection, launch, and guidance of the Standard Missile by the Weapon Control system; and terminal homing by the Fire Control System using the MK-99 illuminator. Attendees will study the System Engineering processes: concept definition; design: and implementation; and understand application in design and upgrade configurations. Focus will be on engineering of the Weapon System including Standard Missile and Aegis Combat System integration. Program and Project Managers, Contract Administrators, Quality Managers, and Engineers (all disciplines) can accelerate their ability to understand ACS design competences.
 
  • Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense
  • What You Will Learn: The main focus will be on engineering of the Weapon System, including Standard Missile and Aegis Combat System integration. Attendees will develop an understanding of the Aegis BMD mission, as well as the system concept definition, design, and implementation based on a mature AWS development philosophy. Attendees will develop an understanding of how Aegis Combat System was upgraded to include the additional BMD mission while maintaining all existing Aegis operational warfare capabilities. Students will examine how the System Engineering process ensures that systems are developed to meet mission performance objectives which are affordable, operationally effective, and timely.
 

What Can Systems Engineers Learn From the Healthcare Roll-out Disaster?

Systems engineering, detailed planning and testing matter. ATIcourses offers a full range of Project Management and Systems Engineering courses. Read this article on the lessons learned (again) from the disaster of the healthcare web roll-out.  A big public failure focuses the mind. Tenet #1 – Reduce complexity. Roll out products in phases, starting with a Minimal […]
Systems engineering, detailed planning and testing matter. ATIcourses offers a full range of Project Management and Systems Engineering courses. Read this article on the lessons learned (again) from the disaster of the healthcare web roll-out.  A big public failure focuses the mind.
Tenet #1 – Reduce complexity. Roll out products in phases, starting with a Minimal Viable Product (MVP).
Tenet #2 – Allow room for discovery and testing. With any software development project, especially one that works with existing components or legacy systems, it’s guaranteed that nobody will know all the potential issues up front.
Tenet #3 – Don’t let sales drive the product road-map.
Tenet #4 – Have a product manager. It’s mind boggling that with hundreds of people and several different companies working on the project, there was no central person, like a Product Manager, responsible for how the pieces fit together.
Read more here  

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Tribute to Robert Nelson (1944 – 2013)

Dr. Robert (Bob) A. Nelson was an engineer’s engineer. He was a well-respected first as a physics teacher, and then after earning his PhD, as a satellite communications expert, an author, a consultant and an instructor for the Applied Technology Institute course Satellite Communication Systems Engineering. Bob was president of Satellite Engineering Research Corporation, a […]

Dr. Robert (Bob) A. Nelson was an engineer’s engineer. He was a well-respected first as a physics teacher, and then after earning his PhD, as a satellite communications expert, an author, a consultant and an instructor for the Applied Technology Institute course Satellite Communication Systems Engineering. Bob was president of Satellite Engineering Research Corporation, a consulting firm in Bethesda, Maryland. He also served for a number of years as the Technical Editor for Via Sat magazine. He was a coauthor of the textbook Satellite Communications Systems Engineering (second edition).

Dr. Nelson was born in Mount Vernon, New York August 14, 1944. Bob died on Sunday April 28, 2013 after a many month battle with cancer.  In spite of the cancer he remained professionally active until the end teaching, and even chairing a technical session during the Satellite 2013 conference in April 2013. He will be missed. Dr. Nelson performed studies on satellite communications, orbit and constellation analysis, and spacecraft design for Space Systems/Loral, GLOBALSTAR, ICO, Sirius Satellite Radio, Arinc, NASA, Naval Research Laboratory, and many other companies and government agencies. Dr Nelson earned a degree in Engineering Physics from Lehigh University and decided that he was called to the teaching profession.  He went on to complete a Master of Education from Lehigh and became a Physics and Math teacher for 15 years in Armonk, New York. His interest in Physics continued to grow and Bob his PhD in Physics from the University of Maryland He was a licensed Professional Engineer. He taught in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Maryland and the long-running short course Satellite Communication Systems Engineering for ATIcourses. Dr. Nelson’s clients included Space Systems/Loral, GLOBALSTAR, ICO, Arinc, Naval Research Laboratory, Lockheed Martin, Ball Aerospace, NASA and many other companies and government agencies. He was an active member of the Space and Satellite community and was recently moderator at the Satellite 2013 session “Quest to Defy Physics: Ka-band and Rain Attenuation”.  He is coauthor of the textbook Satellite Communication Systems Engineering, 2nd ed. (Prentice Hall, 1993). Dr. Nelson was the Technical Editor of Via Satellite magazine. He was a member of IEEE, AIAA, APS, AAPT, AAS, IAU, and ION. Essays on Space and Satellite Communications — by Robert A. Nelson   Dr Nelson was a respected and trusted colleague who had a passion and dedication for everything that he did.  

ATI’s Instructor’s Featured in the Top Five Autonomous Unmanned Aircraft Systems Study

ATI’s instructor Paul Gelhausen’s  company was featured in a recent survey of up-and-coming companies in Unmanned Aircraft Systems.  Paul Gelhausen teaches Unmanned Air Vehicle Design. He is Founder, Managing Member and Chief Technical Officer of an Avid, an aerospace and software company. His company was featured in the recent report  “Emerging Market New Independent Study: Autonomous Unmanned […]
ATI’s instructor Paul Gelhausen’s  company was featured in a recent survey of up-and-coming companies in Unmanned Aircraft Systems.  Paul Gelhausen teaches Unmanned Air Vehicle Design. He is Founder, Managing Member and Chief Technical Officer of an Avid, an aerospace and software company. His company was featured in the recent report  “Emerging Market New Independent Study: Autonomous Unmanned Aircraft Systems And Whom To Watch”. AVID, LLC.  AVID, an aerospace engineering and software development firm provides multidisciplinary aircraft design and analyses. AVID’s focus is the development of novel aerodynamic concepts and aircraft designs, as well as the creation of standards-based, platform-independent, aircraft design and optimization software. www.avidaerospace.com These UAS courses are scheduled. The first two are taught by Paul Gelhausen. The second two are taught by Dr. (Col. Ret.) Jerry LeMieux, who is President Of Unmanned Vehicle University. He has over 40 years and 10,000 hours of aviation experience.
Unmanned Air Vehicle Design Sep 24-26, 2013 Columbia, MD
Unmanned Air Vehicle Design Jan 28-30, 2014 Columbia, MD
Unmanned Aircraft System Fundamentals Jul 23-25, 2013 Columbia, MD
Unmanned Aircraft System Fundamentals Feb 25-27, 2014 Columbia, MD
http://www.prlog.org/12158510-emerging-market-new-independent-study-autonomous-unmanned-aircraft-systems-and-whom-to-watch.html    

Training budgets: Smaller is not an option

  The debate on the budgets for the government organizations is pretty toxic in the US. Both US Navy and US Army alongside other organizations have declared budget shortfalls which effect many areas including training. Without commitment to training and learning new skills there can be no continuous improvement, which is one of the prime […]
  The debate on the budgets for the government organizations is pretty toxic in the US. Both US Navy and US Army alongside other organizations have declared budget shortfalls which effect many areas including training. Without commitment to training and learning new skills there can be no continuous improvement, which is one of the prime directives of any government or company. The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) specializes in short course technical training in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, systems engineering and signal processing. Since 1984 ATI has provided leading-edge public courses and on-site technical training to defense and NASA facilities, as well as DOD and aerospace contractors. The courses provide a clear understanding of the fundamental principles and a working knowledge of current technology and applications.   When your company does not want to pay for the training you really want, as an alternative, you can:
  • Spent your own personal money and funds; if you believe in it and then you will do it
  • Find a user group who are practicing the skills you desire
  • Don’t accept the classic answer from the boss, “How does X help the business?”. If the training is relevant to you achieving a goal of being a much better employee then of course it is relevant.
  • Find another organization to work for
A training manager with a good team can:
  • Fight for your team and their training; fight for your team’s budget and don’t let the senior management take it away
  • Give up your personal training for the entire year and suggest that they allocate the extra budget to training for your team members
  • Perhaps, it is time to evaluate the relationship with the preferred supplier of training. Has your firm been getting decent value from the PSL (preferred supplier list)?
  • Find alternatives to training like brown bag lunches and/or collaborate with other businesses
Everybody needs training and self-improvement. Please share your opinion with us by commenting below.
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Under President Obama, the PUBLIC Sector is Doing Fine

Typical Agile Project Management Process Video Clip: Click to Watch Do You Know How to Satisfy the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Requirements (Circular A-11) while Applying an Agile Execution Approach? If you answered NO, Then you should take our Agile Projects in the Government Environment Course In this powerful two-day course, you’ll grasp the […]
Typical Agile Project Management Process
Typical Agile Project Management Process
Video Clip: Click to Watch
Do You Know How to Satisfy the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Requirements (Circular A-11) while Applying an Agile Execution Approach? If you answered NO, Then you should take our Agile Projects in the Government Environment Course
In this powerful two-day course, you’ll grasp the concepts, principles, and structure of Agile development and how these are being applied in the unique federal environment. A common misconception is that Agility means lack of order or discipline, but that’s incorrect. It requires strong discipline. You must have a solid foundation of practices and procedures in order to successfully adapt Agile in the Government environment, and you must also learn to follow those practices correctly while tying them to pre-defined, rigid quality goals. This workshop gives you the foundation of knowledge and experience you need in order to be successful on your next federal project. Define principles and highlight advantages and disadvantages of Agile development and how to map them to federal guidelines for IT procurement, development and delivery. Get firsthand experience organizing and participating in an Agile team. Put the concepts you learn to practice instantly in the classroom project. Understand and learn how to take advantage of the opportunities for Agile, while applying them within current government project process requirements. Specifically, you will • Consistently deliver better products that will enable your customer’s success • Reduce the risk of project failure, missed deadlines, scope overrun or exceeded budgets • Establish, develop, empower, nurture and protect high-performing teams • Identify and eliminate waste from processes • Map government project language to Agile language simply and effectively • Foster collaboration, even with teams that are distributed geographically and organizationally • Clearly understand how EVM and Agile can be integrated • Understand the structure of Agile processes that breed success in the federal environment • Embrace ever-changing requirements Who Should Attend Because this is an immersion course and the intent is to engage in the practices every Agile team will employ, this course is recommended for all team members responsible for delivering outstanding software. That includes, but is not limited to, the following roles: • Business Analyst • Technical Analyst • Project Manager • Software Engineer/Programmer • Development Manager • Product Manager • Product Analyst • Tester • QA Engineer • Documentation Specialist The Agile Boot Camp is a perfect place for cross functional “teams” to become familiar with Agile methods and learn the basics together. It’s also a wonderful springboard for team building & learning. Bring your project detail to work on in class. About the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) Since 1984, the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has provided leading-edge public courses and onsite technical training to DoD and NASA personnel, as well as contractors. Whether you are a busy engineer, a technical expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of complex systems in a short time. You will become aware of the basic vocabulary essential to interact meaningfully with your colleagues. If you or your team is in need of more technical training, then boost your career with the knowledge needed to provide better, faster, and cheaper solutions for sophisticated DoD and NASA systems. What You Will Learn • Consistently deliver better products that will enable your customer’s success • Reduce the risk of project failure, missed deadlines, scope overrun or exceeded budgets • Establish, develop, empower, nurture and protect high-performing teams • Identify and eliminate waste from processes • Map government project language to Agile language simply and effectively • Foster collaboration, even with teams that are distributed geographically and organizationally • Clearly understand how EVM and Agile can be integrated • Understand the structure of Agile processes that breed success in the federal environment • Embrace ever-changing requirements for your customer’s competitive advantage Why not take a short course? ATI short courses are less than a week long and are designed to help you keep your professional knowledge up-to-date. Our courses provide a practical overview of space and defense technologies which provide a strong foundation for an understanding the issues that must be confronted in the use, regulation and development of complex systems. Dates and Locations For the dates and locations of these short courses, please see below: Jul 19-20, 2012 Baltimore, MD Aug 9-10, 2012 Washington, DC Sep 13-14, 2012 Herndon, VA Oct 18-19, 2012 Columbia, MD Sincerely, The ATI Courses Team P.S Call today for registration at 410-956-8805 or 888-501-2100 or access our website at www.ATIcourses.com. For general questions please email us at ATI@ATIcourses.com


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Systems Engineering Conference October 24-27, 2011 in San Diego, California

ATIcourses teaches more than 40 classes on Systems Engineering at locations around the U.S. Courses including Agile Project Management, Applied Systems Engineering, Architecting with DoDAF, Certified Systems Engineering Professional Preparation, Fundamentals of Systems Engineering and Total Systems Engineering Development & Management. A schedule is shown at https://aticourses.com/schedule.htm#project There is a Systems Engineering Conference October 24-27, […]
ATIcourses teaches more than 40 classes on Systems Engineering at locations around the U.S. Courses including Agile Project Management, Applied Systems Engineering, Architecting with DoDAF, Certified Systems Engineering Professional Preparation, Fundamentals of Systems Engineering and Total Systems Engineering Development & Management. A schedule is shown at https://aticourses.com/schedule.htm#project There is a Systems Engineering Conference October 24-27, 2011 in San Diego, California. Are any of you planning to attend? Please let me know. The details are as follows. Link http://www.ndia.org/meetings/2870/Pages/default.aspx
A major conference focusing on improving acquisition and performance of Defense programs and systems, including net-centric operations and data/information interoperability, system-of-systems engineering and all aspects of system sustainment, will be convened in San Diego, CA, October 24-27, 2011. This conference is sponsored by the National Defense Industrial Association, Systems Engineering Division, with technical co-sponsorship by IEEE AES, IEEE Systems Council and the International Council on Systems Engineering, and is supported by the Office of Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics, Director, Systems Engineering, and Office of the DoD Chief Information Officer. Conference Objectives This conference seeks to create an interactive forum for Program Managers, Systems Engineers, Chief Scientists, and Engineers and Managers from the Requirements, Design, Verification, Support, Logistics and Test communities from both Government and Industry. The conference will provide the opportunity to shape policy and procedures by exchanging innovative tactics and lessons learned.

Defense Budgets: Will It Be Army versus Navy versus Air Force

Cuts in the defense budgets will put stress on all the services. Will it lead to cut throat competition? If the congressional Super Committee fails to find an acceptable solution, the Pentagon would have to cut $600 billion. This would mean cutting up to $100 billion from the fiscal 2013 budget alone. This is a […]
Cuts in the defense budgets will put stress on all the services. Will it lead to cut throat competition? If the congressional Super Committee fails to find an acceptable solution, the Pentagon would have to cut $600 billion. This would mean cutting up to $100 billion from the fiscal 2013 budget alone. This is a good article summarizing the positions of each service. http://defense.aol.com/2011/09/14/biggest-service-food-fight-in-a-generation/

Winning NASA Space Mission Proposals

This is an interesting article on Winning NASA Space Mission Proposals NASA’s robotic space missions are awarded through a competitive proposal process. These missions can cost from $100 to $750 million dollars, not including launch services and inflight propulsion devices. They are presented to the public first as planning documents and later as announcements of […]
This is an interesting article on Winning NASA Space Mission Proposals NASA’s robotic space missions are awarded through a competitive proposal process. These missions can cost from $100 to $750 million dollars, not including launch services and inflight propulsion devices. They are presented to the public first as planning documents and later as announcements of opportunity, or AOs. These AOs are released by NASA’s Science Mission Directorate about once per year for cheaper missions and every few years for higher cost missions. Announcements of opportunity are usually released in draft form about six months from the due-at-NASA date and in final form about three months from the due-at-NASA date. A month or so before the draft release, there will usually be a heads up announcement citing the particulars of the release—schedule, cost cap, etc. These announcements are posted in the NEWS page on each mission’s home page. Explorer Class—usually capped at $200 million although Small Explorers (SMEX) can come in at $120 million. They usually focus on astrophysics and heliophysics and are released every year or so. Since 1958 there have been 92 Explorer missions. http://explorers.gsfc.nasa.gov Discovery Class—The next Discovery release in fall of 2012 is expected to be capped at $500 million. They usually focus on planetary science and are released ever 1-3 years. Since 1995 there have been 11 Discovery missions. http://discovery.nasa.gov/ New Frontiers Class—A spin-off of the Discovery program, they are usually capped at $650 million. New Frontiers usually focus on planetary science. http://newfrontiers.nasa.gov/ Flagship Class missions usually cost several billion dollars and are typically the product of study groups such as the Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group (MEPAG) or the Venus Exploration Analysis Group (VEXAG). They are generally not announced through AOs. http://mepag.jpl.nasa.gov/ http://www.lpi.usra.edu/vexag/ More information is available at http://www.24hrco.com/images/articles/html/EjnerFulsang_July11.pdf

Probing the Ocean for Submarines – Additional Information

Title: Probing the Ocean for Submarines: A History of the AN/SQS-26 Long-Range Echo-Ranging Sonar (2nd Edition) Author: Thaddeus G. Bell Publisher: Peninsula Publishing ISBN: 978-0-932146-26-7 Pages: 264 Binding: Soft cover This book presents the history of the design and development from 1955 to 1975 of the AN/SQS-26 echo-ranging sonar for submarine detection from ocean escorts […]
Title: Probing the Ocean for Submarines: A History of the AN/SQS-26 Long-Range Echo-Ranging Sonar (2nd Edition) Author: Thaddeus G. Bell Publisher: Peninsula Publishing ISBN: 978-0-932146-26-7 Pages: 264 Binding: Soft cover This book presents the history of the design and development from 1955 to 1975 of the AN/SQS-26 echo-ranging sonar for submarine detection from ocean escorts (DEs). The sonar was the first to utilize long-range bottom reflection and convergence zone paths, in addition to the more conventional surface-duct paths. These long-range paths are little affected by submarine depth. In deep water a “bottom bounce” active detection range out to as far as 25 miles is possible, where the bottom is sufficiently reflective. In shallow water the bottom is normally reflective enough to permit echo ranging out to as much as 20 miles via multiple bottom reflections. If the water depth is sufficient, a “convergence zone” is also available from deep refraction paths converging over a narrow annular detection zone with an outer extent up to 40 miles from an echo-ranging source. The book describes AN/SQS-26 echo-ranging detection performance using these long-range paths against surface ships of opportunity, U.S. submarines and Soviet submarines on patrol. Starting about 1975, digital upgrades of the original design were produced for destroyers, guided missile destroyers, and guided missile cruisers. The upgrades are currently being installed at this writing (2011) on the new construction of today’s DDG-51 class guided missile destroyers. In the early 1980s the major characteristics of this surface ship active sonar were also incorporated into the bow array sonar of USN submarines. The historical information presented should be of interest to operational commands, sonar designers, research scientists, undersea warfare tacticians and those involved in resource-allocation decisions for research, development and production programs.