What we have here is a failure to communicate ( Systems Engineering )

Although the term “Systems Engineering” dates back to the 1940s, and the concept was practiced even earlier than that, there seems to be a growing emphasis on System Engineering, perhaps because Systems have become more complex in recent times.  During my early years of training and practice as an electrical engineer decades ago, I do […]

Although the term “Systems Engineering” dates back to the 1940s, and the concept was practiced even earlier than that, there seems to be a growing emphasis on System Engineering, perhaps because Systems have become more complex in recent times.  During my early years of training and practice as an electrical engineer decades ago, I do not recall hearing or learning much about Systems Engineering, but it seems to have gotten much more well-deserved attention since then.  Feel free to argue these points if you wish, but this has been my observation.

So, what can go wrong if Systems Engineering principles are ignored?  What could possibly go wrong if you have multiple engineers concentrating on their own aspect of the overall design, and no one paying attention to the overall system?    Take a look at this humorous video and see what can happen…

But seriously, though…..

One of the best descriptions of Systems Engineering that I have seen is from INCOSE ( International Council on Systems Engineering ).  It says “Systems engineers are at the heart of creating successful new systems. They are responsible for the system concept, architecture, and design. They analyze and manage complexity and risk. They decide how to measure whether the deployed system actually works as intended. They are responsible for a myriad of other facets of system creation. Systems engineering is the discipline that makes their success possible – their tools, techniques, methods, knowledge, standards, principles, and concepts. The launch of successful systems can invariably be traced to innovative and effective systems engineering.”

So, how can today’s busy and overworked engineer learn more about Systems Engineering?  Or, even if you think you already know everything about Systems Engineering, how can you refresh your knowledge so it is more relevant to the workplace of 2019? 

Applied Technology Institute may have exactly what you are looking for.  ATI recently merged with Honourcode, Inc., and now offers a full line of Systems Engineering courses being taught by original Honourcode instructors, including Eric Honour.

 There is still time to register for our next offering of Applied Systems Engineering, being offered in Columbia, Md starting on September 23, 2019.  This course includes a  hands-on class exercise conducted in small groups. Part A analyzes a system concept and requirements, developing specific test requirements,. Part B creates an effective test program and test procedures for the product system. Part C builds the robotic systems per assembly instructions. Part D implements the test program to evaluate the final robots.  It is a really fun and informative in-class exercise.   Here is a cool video of the System Product built in this class.

Please read more about this opportunity at the following link.

https://aticourses.com/training_classes/applied-systems-engineering-m120/

Bill Gates Reveals The 10 Breakthrough Technologies That Will Change The World in 2019

Here’s the full 2019 selection, as picked by Gates – a comprehensive exploration of each idea will be published in the March/ April edition of MIT Technology Review, released on March 5. 1. Robot dexterity—robot hands that can learn to manipulate unfamiliar objects on their own. 2. Predicting preemies—a simple blood test to warn of […]

Here’s the full 2019 selection, as picked by Gates – a comprehensive exploration of each idea will be published in the March/ April edition of MIT Technology Review, released on March 5.

1. Robot dexterity—robot hands that can learn to manipulate unfamiliar objects on their own.
2. Predicting preemies—a simple blood test to warn of a preterm birth, potentially saving many children’s lives.
3. Gut probe in a pill—a swallowable device that can image the digestive tract and even perform biopsies.
4. Custom cancer vaccines—a treatment that uses the body’s own immune system to target only tumor cells.
5. The cow-free burger—both plant-based and lab-grown meat alternatives that could drastically cut emissions from the food industry.
6. Carbon dioxide catcher—techniques for absorbing CO2 from the air and locking it away that may finally become economic.
7. An ECG on your wrist—the ability for people with heart conditions to continuously monitor their health and get early warnings of problems.
8. Sanitation without sewers—a self-contained toilet that could tackle disease and unpleasant living conditions in much of the developing world.
9. Smooth-talking AI assistants—new advances in natural language processing that make digital assistants capable of greater autonomy.
10. New-wave nuclear power—both fission and fusion reactor designs that could help bring down carbon emissions.

To learn about Technology advances and Artifical Intelligence and Deep Learning go to
https://aticourses.com/catalog_of_all_ATI_courses.htm#engineering

To give credit to the sources, I first learned about this list of advances through an email newsletter published via Bernard Marr.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/bernardmarr/2019/02/27/bill-gates-reveals-the-10-breakthrough-technologies-that-will-change-the-world-in-2019/#34fcc6a6171d

Report – Navy Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) Program: Background and Issues for Congress

Issues for Congress regarding the Aegis BMD program include the following: 1.  required numbers of BMD-capable Aegis ships versus available numbers of BMD-capable Aegis ships; 2.  a proposed reduction in planned procurement quantities of SM-3 Block IB and IIA missiles under the FY2018 budget submission, compared to planned quantities under the FY2017 budget submission; 3.  […]
ATLANTIC OCEAN (Oct. 20, 2015) The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) fires a Standard Missile 2 (SM-2) during a live-fire test of the ship's Aegis weapons system Oct. 20, 2015. The Sullivans is participating in At Sea Demonstration 2015 (ASD 15), an exercise testing network interoperability between NATO and allied forces. (U.S. Navy photo by Information Specialist 1st Class Steven Martel/Released) 151020-N-XX999-001 Join the conversation: http://www.navy.mil/viewGallery.asp http://www.facebook.com/USNavy http://www.twitter.com/USNavy http://navylive.dodlive.mil http://pinterest.com https://plus.google.com Issues for Congress regarding the Aegis BMD program include the following: 1.  required numbers of BMD-capable Aegis ships versus available numbers of BMD-capable Aegis ships; 2.  a proposed reduction in planned procurement quantities of SM-3 Block IB and IIA missiles under the FY2018 budget submission, compared to planned quantities under the FY2017 budget submission; 3.  whether the Aegis test facility in Hawaii should be converted into an operational Aegis Ashore site to provide additional BMD capability for defending Hawaii and the U.S. West Coast; 4.  burden sharing—how European naval contributions to European BMD capabilities and operations compare to U.S. naval contributions to European BMD capabilities and operations; 5.  the potential for ship-based lasers, electromagnetic railguns (EMRGs), and hypervelocity projectiles (HVPs) to contribute in coming years to Navy terminal phase BMD operations and the impact this might eventually have on required numbers of ship-based BMD interceptor missiles; 6.  technical risk and test and evaluation issues in the Aegis BMD program; and 7.  the lack of a target for simulating the endo-atmospheric (i.e., final) phase of flight of China’s DF-21 anti-ship ballistic missile. Navy Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) Program Congressional Research Service Continue reading “Report – Navy Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) Program: Background and Issues for Congress”

Video – New Test Success – Navy’s Naval Integrated Fire Control-Counter Air concept (NIFC-CA)

Video – New Test Success – Navy’s Naval Integrated Fire Control-Counter Air concept (NIFC-CA) ATI teaches more than 50 courses on EW, Missile Systems and Radar Tracking. We thought this article would interest our students. This test combines the F-35B EW system with the Aegis System in a new way. https://news.usni.org/2016/09/13/video-successful-f-35-sm-6-live-fire-test-points-expansion-networked-naval-warfare Using targeting information transmitted […]
Video – New Test Success – Navy’s Naval Integrated Fire Control-Counter Air concept (NIFC-CA) ATI teaches more than 50 courses on EW, Missile Systems and Radar Tracking. We thought this article would interest our students. This test combines the F-35B EW system with the Aegis System in a new way. https://news.usni.org/2016/09/13/video-successful-f-35-sm-6-live-fire-test-points-expansion-networked-naval-warfare Using targeting information transmitted from the Marine Corps F-35B, the Navy’s Aegis test site at the White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico launched an SM-6 anti-air missile and struck a target representing an adversarial fighter. F-35 sensors include the Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) radar capable of air-to-air operations, air-to-surface operations, and a broad spectrum of electronic warfare and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance missions. The unmodified F-35 picked up the target with its own sensors and routed the track via the fighter’s Multifunction Advanced Data Link (MADL pronounced: MAHdel) to the Navy’s USS Desert Ship (LLS-1) test platform running the Baseline 9 Aegis Combat System. Lockheed and the Navy attached a MADL antenna to the combat system to receive the track information that fed the information to the SM-6. https://news.usni.org/2016/09/13/video-successful-f-35-sm-6-live-fire-test-points-expansion-networked-naval-warfare To learn more about the F35 go to https://www.f35.com/ https://www.f35.com/media/photos To learn more about ATI’s more than  50 courses on EW, Missile Systems and Radar Tracking https://aticourses.com/catalog_of_all_ATI_courses.htm#radar      

Zumwalt Destroyer Moving Toward Commissioning

The Navy gave a first look inside the stealthy and futuristic Zumwalt destroyer on Friday during the ship’s first port stop at a Rhode Island naval station. The 610-foot-long warship has an angular shape to minimize its radar signature and cost more than $4.4 billion. It’s the most expensive destroyer built for the Navy. It’s […]

The Navy gave a first look inside the stealthy and futuristic Zumwalt destroyer on Friday during the ship’s first port stop at a Rhode Island naval station.

160908-N-CS971-005 NEWPORT, R.I. (Sept. 8, 2016) The guided-missile destroyer Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Zumwalt (DDG 1000) arrives at Naval Station Newport, Rhode Island during its maiden voyage from Bath Iron Works Shipyard in Bath, Maine. The port visit marks Zumwalt’s first stop before the ship ultimately sails to her new homeport of San Diego. During the transit, the ship is scheduled to take part in training operations, a commissioning ceremony in Baltimore and various additional port visits. Zumwalt is named for former Chief of Operations Elmo R. Zumwalt and is the first in a three-ship class of the Navy’s newest, most technologically advanced multi-mission guided-missile destroyers. (U.S. Navy photo by Haley Nace/Released)

The 610-foot-long warship has an angular shape to minimize its radar signature and cost more than $4.4 billion. It’s the most expensive destroyer built for the Navy. It’s headed from Naval Station Newport to Baltimore, where it will be commissioned in October before going to its homeport in San Diego. It was built at Bath Iron Works in Maine.

It is on its way to its commissioning in Baltimore on Oct. 15. The USS Zumwalt is docked at Naval Station Newport on Thursday after its arrival from Maine. The first of three Zumwalt class destroyers, the Zumwalt is about 1½ times the size of the previous Arleigh Burke class destroyers but is manned by only 147 sailors, about half the size of a Burke crew.

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/5780f73caee642cdbab5e4e7dd83a082/us-navy-gives-look-inside-futuristic-44b-zumwalt-destroyer

Interestingly enough, we blogged about this as a “ship of the future” in 2014:

https://aticourses.com/blog/index.php/2014/10/01/navys-stealth-ship-of-the-future-zumwalt/

This link discuss the third Zumwalt ship. Navy consideration of scrapping third ship of Zumwalt-class destroyer to save money.

http://www.militaryaerospace.com/articles/2015/09/zumwalt-class-destroyer.html

The following was posted to USNA-AT-LARGE Yahoo group and was written by Roger Barnett, Professor Emeritus, Naval War College.

Visited Zumwalt yesterday–not USS Zumwalt yet.  (That happens on October 15 in Baltimore:

Local news write-up here:  https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/122348/State%20of%20the%20art%20ship%20visits%20Naval%20Station%20Newport%20%7C%20Page%20One%20%7C%20newportri.com.pdf

Wore my USS Texas  (BB-35) shirt because I was interested in a comparison of that battleship and the new destroyer.  Here’s a bare-bones look at size, complement, and cost:

Zumwalt (2016)     USS Texas (1914)
Length                610ft              573ft
Beam                   81ft               95ft
Displacement     16,000T        27,000T
Complement       147                1,042
Cost                     ≈$4b              $11m in 1912 (≈$275m today)

•  Toured the ship with a group of 25.  Was onboard for about 30 minutes, toured forecastle–no ground tackle in view; bridge–3 watchstanders when ship is underway, (also three watchstanders in engineering, I was told)  very poor visibility from small windows, but large video screens above the windows, all the way around.  Not possible to position lookouts out in the elements.  External visibility must be minimal at night.  Then to Combat:  About 15 workstations in large room, about 20 feet high.  CO’s battlestation on centerline of space, 2/3ds of way back.  Large video screens all around.

•  Ship has complement of 147.  There is no such thing as a separate condition 3; ship is always at condition 3 when underway–owing to automation, no additional stations to fill.

•  No non-rated aboard. All enlisted are E-4 to E-9.  Enlisted live in 4-person compartments, each with its own head.  Officers–except CO, XO, Unit CDR, and Chief of Staff–and most senior CPO’s in 2-person staterooms, en suite.  Ship has about 60 heads (!), which are cleaned by occupants.  I did not ask who cleans CO’s and Unit CDR’s heads.

•  Weapons: 80 VLS launch cells located on the periphery of the ship–outside the lifelines, which are removed when the ship is underway–in the forward third of the ship.  Also two 155mm advanced gun systems in two mounts forward and two 30-mm gun systems that are for defense against small craft swarm tactics (https://news.usni.org/2014/08/05/navy-swaps-anti-swarm-boat-guns-ddg-1000s).  Can embark two MH-60 helos; can also carry drones, which would be embarked as a detachment with controllers, but not simultaneously with helos.  Can carry two RHIBs.  Ship had only one aboard as we saw when we visited the boat deck.  Tour guide said they were investigating loading V-22 Ospreys, but there was an issue with the exhausts damaging the nonskid on the flight deck.  (NFI)

•  Very large composite superstructure, housing SPY-radar system, must be vulnerable to attack with high velocity frag warheads.  SPY not yet installed.  Small navigation radars fore and aft are temporary until SPY system is installed while ship is in San Diego.

•  Ship’s firefighting suite uses fresh water.  Officer conducting tour said he did not know why, except that salt water was more conductive and more damaging to electronics than fresh water.  This was an eye-opener for me, who tends to believe that a fire aboard ship takes precedence to concerns about harming the electronic suite.  The mindset, however, is that the electronic system is life, and without it you will be sure to die, so it is always the top priority.  If someone knows more about this than I do, please enlighten!

•  Electric drive; gas turbine prime movers.

•  Other specs well laid out

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zumwalt-class_destroyer#cite_note-usni5aug14-8

•  Ship class at inception was for 32 ships, now the plan is to build 3.  Follows fairly closely the fate of the B-2 bomber.

How to Promote Your ATI Course in Social Media

How to Promote Your ATI Course in Social Media LinkedIn for ATI Rocket Scientists   Did you know that for 52% of professionals and executives, their LinkedIn profile is the #1 or #2 search result when someone searches on their name? For ATI instructors, that number is substantially lower – just 17%. One reason is […]
How to Promote Your ATI Course in Social Media LinkedIn for ATI Rocket Scientists   Did you know that for 52% of professionals and executives, their LinkedIn profile is the #1 or #2 search result when someone searches on their name? For ATI instructors, that number is substantially lower – just 17%. One reason is that about 25% of ATI instructors do not have a LinkedIn profile. Others have done so little with their profile that it isn’t included in the first page of search results. If you are not using your LinkedIn profile, you are missing a huge opportunity. When people google you, your LinkedIn profile is likely the first place they go to learn about you. You have little control over what other information might be available on the web about you. But you have complete control over your LinkedIn profile. You can use your profile to tell your story – to give people the exact information you want them to have about your expertise and accomplishments.   Why not take advantage of that to promote your company, your services, and your course? Here are some simple ways to promote your course using LinkedIn… On Your LinkedIn Profile Let’s start by talking about how to include your course on your LinkedIn profile so it is visible anytime someone googles you or visits your profile. 1. Add your role as an instructor. Let people know that this course is one of the ways you share your knowledge. You can include your role as an instructor in several places on your profile:
  • Experience – This is the equivalent of listing your role as a current job. (You can have more than one current job.) Use Applied Technology Institute as the employer. Make sure you drag and drop this role below your full-time position.
  • Summary – Your summary is like a cover letter for your profile – use it to give people an overview of who you are and what you do. You can mention the type of training you do, along with the name of your course.
  • Projects – The Projects section gives you an excellent way to share the course without giving it the same status as a full-time job.
  • Headline – Your Headline comes directly below your name, at the top of your profile. You could add “ATI Instructor” at the end of your current Headline.
Start with an introduction, such as “I teach an intensive course through the Applied Technology Institute on [course title]” and copy/paste the description from your course materials or the ATI website. You can add a link to the course description on the ATI website. This example from Tom Logsdon’s profile, shows how you might phrase it:   Here are some other examples of instructors who include information about their courses on their LinkedIn profile:
  • Buddy Wellborn – His Headline says “Instructor at ATI” and Buddy includes details about the course in his Experience section.
  • D. Lee Fugal – Mentions the course in his Summary and Experience.
  • Jim Jenkins – Courses are included throughout Jim’s profile, including his Headline, Summary, Experience, Projects, and Courses.
  • 2. Link to your course page.
In the Contact Info section of your LinkedIn profile, you can link out to three websites. To add your course, go to Edit Profile, then click on Contact Info (just below your number of connections, next to a Rolodex card icon). Click on the pencil icon to the right of Websites to add a new site. Choose the type of website you are adding. The best option is “Other:” as that allows you to insert your own name for the link. You have 35 characters – you can use a shortened version of your course title or simply “ATI Course.” Then copy/paste the link to the page about your course. This example from Jim Jenkins’ profile shows how a customized link looks:   3. Upload course materials. You can upload course materials to help people better understand the content you cover. You could include PowerPoint presentations (from this course or other training), course handouts (PDFs), videos or graphics. They can be added to your Summary, Experience or Project. You can see an example of an upload above, in Tom Logsdon’s profile. 4. Add skills related to your course. LinkedIn allows you to include up to 50 skills on your profile. If your current list of skills doesn’t include the topics you cover in your course, you might want to add them. Go to the Skills & Endorsements section on your Edit Profile page, then click on Add skill. Start typing and let LinkedIn auto-complete your topic. If your exact topic isn’t included in the suggestions, you can add it. 5. Ask students for recommendations. Are you still in touch with former students who were particularly appreciative of the training you provided in your course? You might want to ask them for a recommendation that you can include on your profile. Here are some tips on asking for recommendations from LinkedIn expert Viveka Von Rosen. 6. Use an exciting background graphic. You can add an image at the top of your profile – perhaps a photo of you teaching the course, a photo of your course materials, a graphic from your presentation, or simply some images related to your topic. You can see an example on Val Traver’s profile. Go to Edit Profile, then run your mouse over the top of the page (just above your name). You will see the option to Edit Background. Click there and upload your image. The ideal size is 1400 pixels by 425. LinkedIn prefers a JPG, PNG or GIF. Of course, only upload an image that you have permission to use.   Share News about Your Course You can also use LinkedIn to attract more attendees to your course every time you teach. 7. When a course date is scheduled, share the news as a status update. This lets your connections know that you are teaching a course – it’s a great way to reach the people who are most likely to be interested and able to make referrals. Go to your LinkedIn home page, and click on the box under your photo that says “Share an update.” Copy and paste the URL of the page on the ATI website that has the course description. Once the section below populates with the ATI Courses logo and the course description, delete the URL. Replace it with a comment such as: “Looking forward to teaching my next course on [title] for @Applied Technology Institute on [date] at [location].” Note that when you finish typing “@Applied Technology Institute” it will give you the option to click on the company name. When you do that ATI will know you are promoting the course, and will be deeply grateful! When people comment on your update, it’s nice to like their comment or reply with a “Thank you!” message. Their comment shares the update with their network, so they are giving your course publicity. If you want to start doing more with status updates, here are some good tips about what to share (and what not to share) from LinkedIn expert Kim Garst. 8. Share the news in LinkedIn Groups. If you have joined any LinkedIn Groups in your areas of expertise, share the news there too. Of course, in a Group you want to phrase the message a little differently. Instead of “Looking forward to teaching…” you might say “Registration is now open for…” or “For everyone interested in [topic], I’m teaching…” You could also ask a thought-provoking question on one of the topics you cover. Here are some tips about how to start an interesting discussion in a LinkedIn Group. 9. Post again if you still have seats available. If the course date is getting close and you are looking for more people to register, you should post again. The text below will work as a status update and in most LinkedIn Groups. “We still have several seats open for my course on [title] on [date] at [location]. If you know of anyone who might be interested, could you please forward this? Thanks. ” “We have had a few last-minute cancellations for my course on [title] on [date] at [location]. Know anyone who might be interested in attending?” 10. Blog about the topic of the course. When you publish blog posts on LinkedIn using their publishing platform, you get even more exposure than with a status update:
  • The blog posts are pushed out to all your connections.
  • They stay visible on your LinkedIn profile, and
  • They are made available to Google and other search engines.
A blog post published on LinkedIn will rank higher than one posted elsewhere, because LinkedIn is such an authority site. So this can give your course considerable exposure. You probably have written articles or have other content relevant to the course. Pick something that is 750-1500 words. To publish it, go to your LinkedIn home page, and click on the link that says “Publish a post.” The interface is very simple – easier than using Microsoft Word. Include an image if you can. You probably have something in your training materials that will be perfect. At the end of the post, add a sentence that says: “To learn more, attend my course on [title].” Link the title to the course description on the ATI website. For more tips about blogging, you are welcome to join ProResource’s online training website. The How to Write Blog Posts for LinkedIn course is free. Take the first step The most important version of your bio in the digital world is your LinkedIn summary. If you only make one change as a result of reading this blog post, it should be to add a strong summary to your LinkedIn profile. Write the summary promoting yourself as an expert in your field, not as a job seeker. Here are some resources that can help: Write the first draft of your profile in a word processing program to spell-check and ensure you are within the required character counts. Then copy/paste it into the appropriate sections of your LinkedIn profile. You will have a stronger profile that tells your story effectively with just an hour or two of work! Contributed by guest blogger Judy Schramm. Schramm is the CEO of ProResource, a marketing agency that works with thought leaders to help them create a powerful and effective presence in social media. ProResource offers done-for-you services as well as social media executive coaching. Contact Judy Schramm at jschramm@proresource.com or 703-824-8482.  

Great story on the Aegis Ashore missile defense system

This is a great story on the Aegis Ashore missile defense system. It takes the Aegis Defense system ashore to Deveselu, Romania. An expansion is planned to Poland. To learn about relevant ATI Defense courses go to https://aticourses.com/catalog_of_all_ATI_courses.htm#radar For more information including a video and graphic of the European Missile Defense System go to: https://news.usni.org/2016/07/01/usni-news-video-whats-aegis-ashore USNI […]
This is a great story on the Aegis Ashore missile defense system. It takes the Aegis Defense system ashore to Deveselu, Romania. An expansion is planned to Poland. To learn about relevant ATI Defense courses go to https://aticourses.com/catalog_of_all_ATI_courses.htm#radar For more information including a video and graphic of the European Missile Defense System go to: https://news.usni.org/2016/07/01/usni-news-video-whats-aegis-ashore USNI News Video: What is Aegis Ashore? Sam LaGrone – July 1, 2016 – USNI In May, the U.S. Navy and the Missile Defense Agency activated a maritime radar about 200 miles away from any saltwater. The Lockheed Martin SPY-1D radar is installed in Deveselu, Romania and is the heart of the Aegis Ashore missile defense system built on systems found on the Navy’s guided missile cruisers and destroyers.   “To put it simply, our new missile defense architecture in Europe will provide stronger, smarter, and swifter defenses of American forces and America’s Allies. It is more comprehensive than the previous program; it deploys capabilities that are proven and cost-effective; and it sustains and builds upon our commitment to protect the U.S. homeland against long-range ballistic missile threats; and it ensures and enhances the protection of all our NATO Allies,” President Obama said in 2009.  

You decide – The Best Technical Training for You!

    You can make a difference. Applied Technology Institute is scheduling new courses for September 2016 through July 2017. Please let us know which courses you would like to see on our schedule or brought to your facility. ·         If you have a group of 3 or more people, ATI can schedule an open enrollment course in […]
    You can make a difference. Applied Technology Institute is scheduling new courses for September 2016 through July 2017. Please let us know which courses you would like to see on our schedule or brought to your facility. ·         If you have a group of 3 or more people, ATI can schedule an open enrollment course in your geographic area. ·         If you have a group of 8 or more, ATI can schedule a course on-site at your facility. On-site training brings our experts to you — on your schedule, at your location. It also allows us to plan your training in advance and tailor classes directly to your needs. You can help identify courses to suit your training needs and bring the best short courses to you! ATI courses can help you stay up-to-date with today’s rapidly changing technology. Boost your career. Courses are led by world-class design experts. Learn from the proven best. ATI courses by technical area: Satellites & Space-Related courses Acoustic & Sonar Engineering courses Engineering & Data Analysis courses Radar, Missiles and Combat Systems courses Project Management and Systems Engineering courses ______________________________________________________________________________________________ Contact us: ATI@ATIcourses.com or (410) 956-8805
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Why engineers are better than everyone else

Applied Technology Institute (ATI Courses) offers a variety of courses on space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We believe the news summarized below would be of interest to our readers. February 16 marked the beginning of National Engineers week in the U.S.  EDN celebrated engineers with six reasons Why engineers are better than […]
Applied Technology Institute (ATI Courses) offers a variety of courses on space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We believe the news summarized below would be of interest to our readers. February 16 marked the beginning of National Engineers week in the U.S.  EDN celebrated engineers with six reasons Why engineers are better than everyone else!  The tongue-in-cheek piece elaborated on these engineering qualities:
  • Team work, not cut-throat competition
  • You’re boring at parties
  • Start-ups don’t happen without you
  • Your degree is worth more than the paper it’s printed on
  • Go ahead, argue
  • Others make problems, engineers find solutions.
For the logic, see the entire article (Why engineers are better than everyone else) by Suzanne Deffree, February 20, 2014.  

Fun post on Deflategate with STEM applications

This is a fun article on measuring the bounce of under-and over- inflated footballs, basketballs and soccer balls. It can attract interest in STEM and applying the scientific method. “The purpose of this article (Bouncing Back From “Deflategate” Bouncing Back From “Deflategate”) is to bring “Deflategate and the Physics of a Bouncing Ball” into the […]
This is a fun article on measuring the bounce of under-and over- inflated footballs, basketballs and soccer balls. It can attract interest in STEM and applying the scientific method. “The purpose of this article (Bouncing Back From “Deflategate” Bouncing Back From “Deflategate”) is to bring “Deflategate and the Physics of a Bouncing Ball” into the laboratory activities of high school and undergraduate introductory physics courses in a way that does not involve the ideal gas law.” Read more here.


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New Horizons – This was almost a disaster, but was saved by knowledgeable scientists.

The people in the Mission Operations Center — “the MOC” — had been tracking NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft for 9½ years as it journeyed the breadth of the solar system. It was just 10 days away from the dwarf planet Pluto when, at 1:55 p.m. on July 4, it vanished. The disappearance of the spacecraft […]
The people in the Mission Operations Center — “the MOC” — had been tracking NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft for 9½ years as it journeyed the breadth of the solar system. It was just 10 days away from the dwarf planet Pluto when, at 1:55 p.m. on July 4, it vanished. The disappearance of the spacecraft challenged the New Horizons team to perform at its highest level and under the greatest of deadline pressures. They did work efficiently and saved the mission. We all wish the New Horizons team the best as they approach the busiest time of the fly-by encounter. I have known and respected many of the engineers and scientist for more than 20 years and am happy to praise their skills. The nature of the New Horizons mission did not permit any wiggle room, any delays, any do-overs, because it was a flyby. The spacecraft had one shot at Pluto, tightly scheduled: When it vanished, New Horizons was going about 32,000 miles per hour and on track to make its closest pass to Pluto, about 7,800 miles, at precisely 7:49 a.m. July 14. But as the New Horizons team gathered in the control room on July 4, no one knew whether their spacecraft was still alive.   Because New Horizons is so far away, it takes 4 1/2 hours for a one-way message between the spacecraft and the MOC. That means whatever happened to New Horizons on July 4 had actually happened 4 1/2 hours before the people in Mission Operations knew about it.   The team figured out what had gone wrong. The spacecraft’s main computer had been compressing new scientific data for downloading much later. At the same time, it was supposed to execute some previously uploaded commands. It got overloaded; the spacecraft has an “autonomy” system that can decide what to do if something’s not quite right. That system decided to switch from the main to the backup computer and go into safe mode. Read more at http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/the-inside-story-of-new-horizons-apollo-13-moment-on-its-way-to-pluto/2015/07/10/fb361248-25ad-11e5-b72c-2b7d516e1e0e_story.html Additional information about the start of the New Horizons mission and the key roles played by ATI instructors who worked (and are still working) on the New Horizons mission see https://aticourses.com/blog/index.php/2015/06/30/the-new-horizons-mission-to-plutoten-experts-who-worked-behind-the-scenes-on-the-new-horizons-mission-and-who-teach-for-aticourses/ https://aticourses.com/blog/index.php/2015/07/09/new-horizons-recollections-of-ground-system-engineer-steve-gemeny/

Attend Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) Fundamentals (1-day) and the follow-on MBSE Applications courses (2-days)

My name is Zane Scott and I teach the Model-Based Systems Engineering courses for Applied Technology Institute (ATICourses).  I want to invite you the ATI’s Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) Fundamentals (1-day) and the follow-on MBSE Applications courses (2-days). The Model-Based Systems Engineering Fundamentals course includes discussion of real-life benefits from this approach versus the traditional […]
My name is Zane Scott and I teach the Model-Based Systems Engineering courses for Applied Technology Institute (ATICourses).  I want to invite you the ATI’s Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) Fundamentals (1-day) and the follow-on MBSE Applications courses (2-days). The Model-Based Systems Engineering Fundamentals course includes discussion of real-life benefits from this approach versus the traditional document-centric systems design methodology. The two-day follow-on class provides in-depth practical advice and case studies based on specific satellite and defense systems case studies.
Model-based Systems Engineering Fundamentals Aug 11, 2015 Columbia, MD
Model-based Systems Engineering (2 day) Aug 12-13, 2015 Columbia, MD
 
The benefits of MBSE from a program manager/sponsor perspective are emphasized in day 1, which is available as a stand-along course for Program Managers and other non-technical sponsors. The two-day follow-on class provides in-depth knowledge for the working systems engineer. These courses are practical and useful in managing complex systems design projects utilizing MBSE which promises to impact projects positively by improving communication among the team, promoting reuse (and associated cost/risk reduction), and maintaining traceability from the requirements through validation and verification. But are these promises fulfilled and results documented? Case studies are used to illustrate the practical benefits of MBSE.  MBSE was recently used on a student project at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University. The student team was so impressed by the effectiveness of this approach that they recorded a 2014 case study webinar. This success story is especially beneficial for Systems Engineering Managers seeking to clearly understand the Return on Investment from MBSE. Systems Engineering practitioners will appreciate the in-depth practical system design process outlined in day 2 and 3 of this course with reference to the CubeSat program case study. The Embry-Riddle EagleSat program took off in 2012 as part of NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative. The student-run, professor-guided organization has a goal of flying Embry-Riddle’s first satellite, a fully functioning 10-centimeter cube focused on analyzing the susceptibility of computer memory to solar radiation, while also mapping the body’s orbital decay over time.   The systems engineering effort, undertaken through the use of MBSE, has played a critical role in requirements management and maintaining design traceability throughout the development process and across all six subsystems. The choice to use MBSE comes from the approach’s inherent ability to document complex element relationships while easily and fully communicating these to other team members through generated reports and descriptive diagrams. Please consider attending either the 1-day Fundamentals class if you need an overview, or the full 3-day class to learn how to effectively apply MBSE to real-world, complex systems engineering projects.
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STEM- The Latest Trend For Kids- Vote For Your Favorite Starter Kit

The latest trend in toys isn’t an app or a TV character, it’s STEM: aka, science, technology, engineering, and math. More companies are creating toys that improve these particular skill sets without boring children. Now is your chance to vote for the best STEM starter kit! Each week you can choose your favorite STEM Starters […]
The latest trend in toys isn’t an app or a TV character, it’s STEM: aka, science, technology, engineering, and math. More companies are creating toys that improve these particular skill sets without boring children. Now is your chance to vote for the best STEM starter kit! Each week you can choose your favorite STEM Starters to move to the next round. Winners of each round (declared by the majority reader-vote) advance to the next round for future voting. Vote here to support young scientists and engineers!


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New INCOSE CSEP Handbook v4.0 to be Released! Pass the CSEP test Now!

New INCOSE Handbook – New CSEP Opportunities The newest INCOSE SE Handbook (version 4.0) is expected this month (June 2015). Now is a great time to plan for the CSEP/ASEP exam best suited to you, because the transition gives you a choice!. Insider Hint – Since the CSEP application process can be long and time […]
New INCOSE Handbook – New CSEP Opportunities The newest INCOSE SE Handbook (version 4.0) is expected this month (June 2015). Now is a great time to plan for the CSEP/ASEP exam best suited to you, because the transition gives you a choice!. Insider Hint – Since the CSEP application process can be long and time intensive, sign up first to become an ASPE. Once you pass the exam, you then can take your time to complete the more demanding CSEP application process. The Handbook was delayed to coincide with the recent release of ISO-15288. Now INCOSE will offer a transition period for you. From now through December 2015, the current exam will continue to be primary, based on Handbook v3.2.2. The new exam will become primary in January 2016 – but the new exam can also be available by special request as early as July. ATI matches the transition with our Certified Systems Engineering Professional (CSEP) Preparation course. You can still take our 2-day course based on Handbook v3.2.2 on July 7-8, 2015 in Chantilly, VA. Or you can expand your knowledge with our new 3-day version based on Handbook 4.0 on September 24-26 (and forward). The new course will cover the significant expansion in the new Handbook (another 50 pages!) and will also include more exercises and activities to help you “seal in” the knowledge for the exam. You can choose! Take the shorter course and get your ASEP/CSEP now, before the change – or take the longer course to get the full set of new knowledge and more learning activities. Either way, you advance your career by gaining the INCOSE certification!  
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Why is March 14, 2015 special to geeks, engineers and scientists? ATI knows. Do you know?

Why is March 14, 2015 special to geeks, engineers and scientists? ATI knows. Do you know? It is PI Day! This holiday celebrates one of the most important numbers in mathematics at 3.14.15 at 9:26:53. The number π is a mathematical constant, the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter, commonly approximated as 3.14159. […]
Why is March 14, 2015 special to geeks, engineers and scientists? ATI knows. Do you know? It is PI Day! This holiday celebrates one of the most important numbers in mathematics at 3.14.15 at 9:26:53. The number π is a mathematical constant, the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter, commonly approximated as 3.14159. It has been represented by the Greek letter “π” since the mid-18th century, though it is also sometimes spelled out as “pi” (/paɪ/). Being an irrational number, π cannot be expressed exactly as a common fraction, although fractions such as 22/7 and other rational numbers are commonly used to approximate π. Consequently its decimal representation never ends and never settles into a permanent repeating pattern. The digits appear to be randomly distributed; however, to date, no proof of this has been discovered. Also, π is a transcendental number – a number that is not the root of any non-zero polynomial having rational coefficients. This transcendence of π implies that it is impossible to solve the ancient challenge of squaring the circle with a compass and straightedge. Because its definition relates to the circle, π is found in many formulae in trigonometry and geometry, especially those concerning circles, ellipses or spheres. It is also found in formulae used in other branches of science such as cosmology, number theory, statistics, fractals, thermodynamics, mechanics and electromagnetism. The ubiquity of π makes it one of the most widely known mathematical constants both inside and outside the scientific community: Several books devoted to it have been published, the number is celebrated on Pi Day and record-setting calculations of the digits of π often result in news headlines. Attempts to memorize the value of π with increasing precision have led to records of over 67,000 digits.


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The Invisible Machine: Electromagnetic Warfare

Applied Technology Institute (ATI Courses) offers the courses below on EMI/EMC technology. Design for Electomagentic Compatibility & Signal Integrity Feb 10-11, 2015 San Diego, CA Design for Electomagentic Compatibility & Signal Integrity Feb 17-18, 2015 Orlando, FL EMI/EMC in Military Systems Sep 23-25, 2014 Columbia, MD EMI/EMC in Military Systems Nov 18-20, 2014 Newport, RI […]
A right front view of a USAF Boeing E-4 advanced airborne command post (AABNCP) on the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) simulator (HAGII-C) for testing.
Applied Technology Institute (ATI Courses)
offers the courses below on EMI/EMC technology.
Design for Electomagentic Compatibility & Signal Integrity Feb 10-11, 2015 San Diego, CA
Design for Electomagentic Compatibility & Signal Integrity Feb 17-18, 2015 Orlando, FL
EMI/EMC in Military Systems Sep 23-25, 2014 Columbia, MD
EMI/EMC in Military Systems Nov 18-20, 2014 Newport, RI
We thought the news below could be of interest to our readers. Imagine the future – a strange new weapon is detonated high over a large city. There is no explosion, no visible destruction, but everything electronic within the range of this weapon will go out…permanently. Every electronic gadget in every home and office – disabled. No computers, no T.V., no life support systems in hospitals, no water supply, no heat, no lights – truly, a return to the dark ages. Imagine a full range of new weapons; one can take out the electricity in your city, another can destroy you. If you haven’t heard about these weapons, it’s no surprise. Their development has been secretive and they sound more like science fiction than reality. When did this reality really begin and how far advanced is it now? The fact is  Electromagnetic Warfare Is Here.
Read more here.


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hitchBot: Not The Hitchhiker Your Mother Warned You About!

“My name is hitchBot.” Your mother might have warned you about picking up hitchhikers, but clearly she never met hitchBOT. The brainchild of Ryerson’s Frauke Zeller and McMaster’s David Smith, hitchBOT was raised by a family of researchers, and described itself as “a free-spirited robot who wanted to explore Canada and meet new friends along […]
“My name is hitchBot.” Your mother might have warned you about picking up hitchhikers, but clearly she never met hitchBOT. The brainchild of Ryerson’s Frauke Zeller and McMaster’s David Smith, hitchBOT was raised by a family of researchers, and described itself as “a free-spirited robot who wanted to explore Canada and meet new friends along the way.” HitchBot has a bucket body, pool noodles for arms and legs, wears rubber boots and has rubber gloves for hands, complete with the ever important hitching thumb. HitchBOT was created by a team of Ontario-based communications researchers studying the relationship between people and technology. It’s not every day you see a robot at the side of the road, and hitchBOT quickly became a media darling. Pretty soon, hitchBOT was fielding interview requests and rubbing shoulders with celebrities. Somebody would be curious, stop and pick her up. She would say, ‘Hi, I’m hitchBot, I’m going to Victoria. Would you like to give me a ride?’ Usually they would say, ‘Sure.’ She would hop in, plug into the cigarette lighter and they drive along. The driver would drop her on the highway because they had to turn off and they would just leave her on the highway. Just like some human hitchhikers, hitchBot was good road company. She would ask what you think about the creation of the universe or if you believe in God. She was able to talk about that she was going to Victoria. She explained who her creators are by name. So she’s very intelligent. Over the course of its cross-country adventure hitchBOT chilled with the Kelowna-based band The Wild!, met the groundhog known as Wiarton Willie, and crashed a wedding, where it adorably interrupted the bride and groom’s toasts to proclaim, “I like to make friends.” That level of cute should really be illegal, but hitchBOT pulled it off in style. After travelling more than 6,000 kilometres from coast to coast, hitchBOT arrived in Victoria, B.C. on Saturday. Throughout the three-week journey, a popular Twitter account, @hitchBOT, kept followers informed of the robot’s progress and adventures. The account currently has more than 34,000 followers. Robotics are definitely becoming increasingly larger part of our lives. Scientists from Japan and France, working together, announced last month that they had developed an algorithm that can recognize emotions from a human gait. What is your opinion on this? Please comment below…
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How will Japanese robot provide emotional support to the astronauts?

The world’s first robot astronaut is pining for a conversation partner as he waits for Japanese spaceman Koichi Wakata aboard the International Space Station. “Mr. Wakata, are you not here yet? I really want to see you soon,” the pint-sized android said in a message released by its project team in Japan Wednesday. The wide-eyed […]
The world’s first robot astronaut is pining for a conversation partner as he waits for Japanese spaceman Koichi Wakata aboard the International Space Station. “Mr. Wakata, are you not here yet? I really want to see you soon,” the pint-sized android said in a message released by its project team in Japan Wednesday. The wide-eyed and bootie-wearing “Kirobo” — roughly the size of a chihuahua — left Earth on a cargo-carrying rocket and reached the space station on August 10. Wakata along with Mikhail Tyurin of Russia and NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio will be aboard the Soyuz-FG rocket which set off from Kazakhstan at 0414 GMT on Thursday for a six-hour journey to the ISS. Kirobo, which stands just 13.4 inches tall and weighs about 2.2 pounds, is programmed to communicate in Japanese and keep records of its conversations with Wakata, the first Japanese astronaut to command the ISS. The robot is part of a study aimed at seeing how a non-human companion can provide emotional support for people isolated over long periods.


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New addition to the already successful Wireless Communications and Spread Spectrum course!! Cognitive Systems to Improve Data Link Quality of Service

Applied Technology Institute (ATI Courses) offers High-Level Wireless Digital Communications for Program and Engineering Managers course. This added material discusses the needs to develop a cognitive system in order to mitigate the effects that the environment has on communications and/or data links. Cognition is the ability for system/systems to monitor, record, sample, test, and to […]
Applied Technology Institute (ATI Courses) offers High-Level Wireless Digital Communications for Program and Engineering Managers course. This added material discusses the needs to develop a cognitive system in order to mitigate the effects that the environment has on communications and/or data links. Cognition is the ability for system/systems to monitor, record, sample, test, and to be cognitive or aware of the surrounding environments; and then adapts, modifies, or changes the system to improve the Quality of Service. The basic concept is developing a system, radio, antenna, in a network, and using the available resources to monitor the environment and make an optimal change to the system to improve the Quality of Service QoS of the wireless link. There are many changing factors of the environment that requires a system to be cognitive and adapt to these changes to mitigate their effects on the communications/data link system.  These include jammers both friendly and unfriendly and channel degradation.  The channel or path of the data link can be degraded by various factors such as; jammers, atmospheric changes, blockage from obstacles like hills, buildings or other, and multipath.  All of these factors can reduce the desired signal level or increase the noise which can degrade the signal level or QoS. In addition, broadband noise can degrade the data link by the adjacent equipment that raises the noise floor which causes the data link to have insufficient signal-to-noise ratio, S/N. There are several cognitive techniques that can be used to mitigate the effects of jammers and channel degradation to improve the QoS of the data link.  Some of the basic techniques include; Dynamic Spectrum Allocation DSA, Power Gain Control, Waveform including Types of Modulation, Spread Spectrum and Error Correction, Adaptive Filters, Cosite RF Tunable Filters, Dynamic Antenna Techniques using AESAs including Multiple In Multiple Out MIMO, and Network Configurations including Multi-hop adhoc meshed networks, forming, self-healing and others.  This presentation addresses these cognitive techniques and provides multiple solutions and system tradeoffs to provide the optimal solution using the available capabilities.
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Training budgets: Smaller is not an option

  The debate on the budgets for the government organizations is pretty toxic in the US. Both US Navy and US Army alongside other organizations have declared budget shortfalls which effect many areas including training. Without commitment to training and learning new skills there can be no continuous improvement, which is one of the prime […]
  The debate on the budgets for the government organizations is pretty toxic in the US. Both US Navy and US Army alongside other organizations have declared budget shortfalls which effect many areas including training. Without commitment to training and learning new skills there can be no continuous improvement, which is one of the prime directives of any government or company. The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) specializes in short course technical training in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, systems engineering and signal processing. Since 1984 ATI has provided leading-edge public courses and on-site technical training to defense and NASA facilities, as well as DOD and aerospace contractors. The courses provide a clear understanding of the fundamental principles and a working knowledge of current technology and applications.   When your company does not want to pay for the training you really want, as an alternative, you can:
  • Spent your own personal money and funds; if you believe in it and then you will do it
  • Find a user group who are practicing the skills you desire
  • Don’t accept the classic answer from the boss, “How does X help the business?”. If the training is relevant to you achieving a goal of being a much better employee then of course it is relevant.
  • Find another organization to work for
A training manager with a good team can:
  • Fight for your team and their training; fight for your team’s budget and don’t let the senior management take it away
  • Give up your personal training for the entire year and suggest that they allocate the extra budget to training for your team members
  • Perhaps, it is time to evaluate the relationship with the preferred supplier of training. Has your firm been getting decent value from the PSL (preferred supplier list)?
  • Find alternatives to training like brown bag lunches and/or collaborate with other businesses
Everybody needs training and self-improvement. Please share your opinion with us by commenting below.
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ATI’s Fiber Optic Communication Systems Engineering Course

Can You Perform Cost Analysis or Design Fiber Optic Systems? This three-day course investigates the basic aspects of digital and analog fiber-optic communication systems. Topics include sources and receivers, optical fibers and their propagation characteristics, and optical fiber systems. The principles of operation and properties of optoelectronic components, as well as signal guiding characteristics of […]
Can You Perform Cost Analysis or Design Fiber Optic Systems?
This three-day course investigates the basic aspects of digital and analog fiber-optic communication systems. Topics include sources and receivers, optical fibers and their propagation characteristics, and optical fiber systems. The principles of operation and properties of optoelectronic components, as well as signal guiding characteristics of glass fibers are discussed. System design issues include both analog and digital point-to-point optical links and fiber-optic networks. From this course you will obtain the knowledge needed to perform basic fiber-optic communication systems engineering calculations, identify system tradeoffs, and apply this knowledge to modern fiber optic systems. This will enable you to evaluate real systems, communicate effectively with colleagues, and understand the most recent literature in the field of fiber-optic communications. Since 1984, the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has provided leading-edge public courses and onsite technical training. Whether you are a busy engineer, a technical expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of complex systems in a short time. You will become aware of the basic vocabulary essential to interact meaningfully with your colleagues. If you or your team is in need of more technical training, then boost your career with the knowledge needed to provide better, faster, and cheaper solutions for these sophisticated systems. Why not take a short course????????????????? ATI short courses are less than a week long and are designed to help you keep your professional knowledge up-to-date. Our courses provide a practical overview of space and defense technologies which provide a strong foundation for an understanding the issues that must be confronted in the use, regulation and development of complex systems. What You Will Learn: • What are the basic elements in analog and digital fiber optic communication systems including fiber-optic components and basic coding schemes? • How fiber properties such as loss, dispersion and non-linearity impact system performance. • How systems are compensated for loss, dispersion and non-linearity. • How a fiber-optic amplifier works and it’s impact on system performance. • How to maximize fiber bandwidth through wavelength division multiplexing. • How is the fiber-optic link budget calculated? • What are typical characteristics of real fiber-optic systems including CATV, gigabit Ethernet, POF data links, RF-antenna remoting systems, long-haul telecommunication links.

Computational Electromagnetics (CEM): New Course from ATI

Video Clip: Click to Watch With this course you will become more of an electromagnetic expert This three-day course teaches the basics of Computational Electromagnetics (CEM) with application examples. Fundamental concepts in the solution of EM radiation and scattering problems are presented. Emphasis is on applying computational methods to practical applications. Students will be able to […]
Maxwell’s Equations in Vector Form
Video Clip: Click to Watch
With this course you will become more of an electromagnetic expert
This three-day course teaches the basics of Computational Electromagnetics (CEM) with application examples. Fundamental concepts in the solution of EM radiation and scattering problems are presented. Emphasis is on applying computational methods to practical applications. Students will be able to identify the most relevant CEM method for various applications, avoid common user pitfalls, understand model validation and correctly interpret results. Students are encouraged to bring their laptop to work examples using the provided FEKO Lite code. You will also learn the importance of model development and meshing, post- processing for scientific visualization and presentation of results. COMPUTATIONAL ELECTROMAGNETICS What You Will Learn: • A review of electromagnetics and antennas with modern applications. • An overview of popular CEM methods with commercial codes as examples • Hands-on experience with FEKO Lite to demonstrate modeling guidelines and common pitfalls. • An understanding of the latest developments in CEM methods and High Performance Computing. Course Outline, Samplers, and Notes Determine for yourself the value of this course before you sign up. See Slide Samples. Participants will receive a complete set of notes, a copy of FEKO and textbook for future reference. You can add notes and more detail based on the in-class interaction. After completion, all students receive a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information. About ATI and the Instructors Our mission here at ATI is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses. ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology. Dr. Keefe Coburn is a senior design engineer with the U.S. Army Research Laboratory in Adelphi MD. He has a Bachelor’s degree in Physics from the VA Polytechnic Institute with Masters and Doctoral Degrees from the George Washington University. In his job at the Army Research Lab, he applies CEM tools for antenna design, system integration and system performance analysis. He teaches graduate courses at the Catholic University of America in antenna and remote sensing. He is a member of the IEEE, the Applied Computational Electromagnetics Society, the Union of Radio Scientists and Sigma Xi. He serves on the Configuration Control Board for the Army developed GEMACS code and the ACES Board of Directors. Dates and Locations For the dates and locations of this short course, please see below: May 16-18, 2012 in Columbia, MD Sincerely, The ATI Courses Team P.S Call today for registration at 410-956-8805 or 888-501-2100 or access our website at www.ATIcourses.com. For general questions please email us at ATI@ATIcourses.com or Join, Link, Follow or Share with us at: Join us on Facebook Link to us on LinkedIn Follow us on Twitter Share with us on Slideshare P.P.S. What Happens at ATI does NOT Stay at ATI because our training helps you and your organization remain competitive in this changing world. Please feel free to call Mr. Jenkins personally to discuss your requirements and objectives. He will be glad to explain in detail what ATI can do for you, what it will cost, and what you can expect in results and future performance.

ATI Instructor Releases A New Book On Wavelets + 25% discount!

ATI offers Wavelets: A Conceptual Practical Approach course on Jun 12-14, 2012 in Columbia, MD.  We thought our reader might be interested in the fact that our instructor Amir Nijami released a new book called Wavelets: A Concise Guide.  You can follow this link to purchase the book and receive 25% discount https://secureservercdn.net/192.169.223.13/56v.d29.myftpupload.com/Book_JHUPress.pdf Introduced nearly three decades ago as a […]
ATI offers Wavelets: A Conceptual Practical Approach course on Jun 12-14, 2012 in Columbia, MD.  We thought our reader might be interested in the fact that our instructor Amir Nijami released a new book called Wavelets: A Concise Guide.  You can follow this link to purchase the book and receive 25% discount https://secureservercdn.net/192.169.223.13/56v.d29.myftpupload.com/Book_JHUPress.pdf Introduced nearly three decades ago as a variable resolution alternative to the Fourier transform, awavelet is a short oscillatory waveform for analysis of transients. The discrete wavelet transformhas remarkable multi-resolution and energy-compaction properties. Amir-Homayoon Najmi’sintroduction to wavelet theory explains this mathematical concept clearly and succinctly.Wavelets are used in processing digital signals and imagery from myriad sources. They form thebackbone of the JPEG2000 compression standard, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation usesbiorthogonal wavelets to compress and store its vast database of fingerprints. Najmi provides themathematics that demonstrate how wavelets work, describes how to construct them, and discussestheir importance as a tool to investigate and process signals and imagery. He reviews key conceptssuch as frames, localizing transforms, orthogonal and biorthogonal bases, and multi-resolution.His examples include the Haar, the Shannon, and the Daubechies families of orthogonal andbiorthogonal wavelets.Our capacity and need for collecting and transmitting digital data is increasing at an astonishingrate. So too is the importance of wavelets to anyone working with and analyzing digital data.Najmi’s primer will be an indispensable resource for those in computer science, the physicalsciences, applied mathematics, and engineering who wish to obtain an in-depth understanding andworking knowledge of this fascinating and evolving field. To receive a 25% discount, please send an email to ATI@ATIcourses.com requesting the discount form.
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Announcing ATI’s New Model Based Systems Engineering with OMG SysML

Video Clip: Click to Watch MODEL BASED SYSTEMS ENGINEERING WITH OMG SYSML™  Increased Productivity through Model-Based Systems Engineering Principles and Practices This three day course is intended for practicing systems engineers who want to learn how to apply model-driven systems engineering practices using the UML Profile for Systems Engineering (OMG SysML™).You will apply systems engineering principles […]
Video Clip: Click to Watch
MODEL BASED SYSTEMS ENGINEERING WITH OMG SYSML™  Increased Productivity through Model-Based Systems Engineering Principles and Practices
This three day course is intended for practicing systems engineers who want to learn how to apply model-driven systems engineering practices using the UML Profile for Systems Engineering (OMG SysML™).You will apply systems engineering principles in developing a comprehensive model of a solution to the class problem, using modern systems engineering development tools and a development methodology tailored to OMG SysML™. The methodology begins with the presentation of a desired capability and leads you through the performance of activities and the creation of work products to support requirements definition, architecture description and system design. The methodology offers suggestions for how to transition to specialty engineering, with an emphasis on interfacing with software engineering activities. Use of a modeling tool is required.  What You Will Learn: • Identify and describe the use of all nine OMG SysML™ diagrams • Follow a formal methodology to produce a system model in a modeling tool • Model system behavior using an activity diagram • Model system behavior using a state diagram • Model system behavior using a sequence diagram • Model requirements using a requirements diagram • Model requirements using a use case diagram • Model structure using block diagrams • Allocate behavior to structure in a model • Recognize parametrics and constraints and describe their usage Each student will receive a lab manual describing how to create each diagram type in the selected tool, access to the Object-Oriented Systems Engineering Methodology (OOSEM) website and a complete set of lecture notes. You can add notes and more detail based on the in-class interaction. When the course is over you will receive a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information. About ATI and the Instructor Our mission here at the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses. Since 1984, ATI has provided leading-edge public courses and onsite technical training to DoD and NASA personnel, as well as contractors. Whether you are a busy engineer, a technical expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of complex systems in a short time. You will become aware of the basic vocabulary essential to interact meaningfully with your colleagues. If you or your team is in need of more technical training, then boost your career with the knowledge needed to provide better, faster, and cheaper solutions for sophisticated DoD and NASA systems. ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology. J.D. Baker is a Software Systems Engineer with expertise in system design processes and methodologies that support Model-Based Systems Engineering. He has over 20 years of experience providing training and mentoring in software and system architecture, systems engineering, software development, iterative/agile development, object-oriented analysis and design, the Unified Modeling Language (UML), the UML Profile for Systems Engineering (SysML), use case driven requirements, and process improvement. He has participated in the development of UML, OMG SysML, and the UML Profile for DoDAF and MODAF. J.D. holds many industry certifications, including OMG Certified System Modeling Professional (OCSMP), OMG Certified UML Professional (OCUP), Sun Certified Java Programmer, and he holds certificates as an SEI Software Architecture Professional and ATAM Evaluator. Date and Location The date and location for this short course is: May 22-24, 2012 in Columbia, MD Click here for more information For the dates and locations of all of our short courses, please access the links below. Sincerely, The ATI Courses Team P.S. Call today for registration at 410-956-8805 or 888-501-2100 or access our website at www.ATIcourses.com. For general questions please email us at ATI@ATIcourses.com or Join, Link, Follow or Share with us at: Join us on Facebook Link to us on LinkedIn Follow us on Twitter Share with us on Slideshare P.P.S. What Happens at ATI does NOT Stay at ATI because our training helps you and your organization remain competitive in this changing world. Please feel free to call Mr. Jenkins personally to discuss your requirements and objectives. He will be glad to explain in detail what ATI can do for you, what it will cost, and what you can expect in results and future performance.

Fundamentals of COTS-Based Systems Engineering Course

C. O. T. S. = Commercial Off-the-Shelf Video Clip: Click to Watch Leveraging Commercial Off-the-Shelf Technology for System Success  This three day course provides a systemic overview of how to use Systems Engineering to plan, manage, and execute projects that have significant Commercial-off-the-Shelf (COTS) content. Modern development programs are increasingly characterized by COTS solutions (both hardware […]
C. O. T. S. = Commercial Off-the-Shelf
Video Clip: Click to Watch
Leveraging Commercial Off-the-Shelf Technology for System Success  This three day course provides a systemic overview of how to use Systems Engineering to plan, manage, and execute projects that have significant Commercial-off-the-Shelf (COTS) content. Modern development programs are increasingly characterized by COTS solutions (both hardware and software) in both the military and commercial domains. The course focuses on the fundamentals of planning, execution, and follow-through that allow for the delivery of excellent and effective COTS-based systems to ensure the needs of all external and internal stakeholders are met. Participants will learn the necessary adjustments to the fundamental principles of Systems Engineering when dealing with COTS technologies. Numerous examples of COTS systems are presented. Practical information and tools are provided that will help the participants deal with issues that inevitably occur in the real word. Extensive in-class exercises are used to stimulate application of the course material. Who Should Attend? • Prime and subcontractor engineers who procure COTS components. • Suppliers who produce and supply COTS components (hardware and software). • Technical team leaders whose responsibilities include COTS technologies. • Program and engineering managers that oversee COTS development efforts. • Government regulators, administrators, and sponsors of COTS procurement efforts. • Military professionals who work with COTS-based systems. For more information: FUNDAMENTALS OF COTS-BASED SYSTEMS ENGINEERING Why not take a short course? Our short courses are less than a week long and are designed to help you keep your professional knowledge up-to-date. This course provides provide a strong foundation for understanding the issues that must be confronted in the procurement and use of COTS systems. Course Outline and Notes This short course is designed for individuals who plan, manage, and execute projects that have significant COTS content. What You Will Learn: • The key characteristics of COTS components. • How to effectively plan and manage a COTS development effort. • How using COTS affects your requirements and design. • How to effectively integrate COTS into your systems. • Effective verification and validation of COTS-based systems. • How to manage your COTS suppliers. • The latest lessons learned from over two decades of COTS developments. After attending the course each student will receive a complete set of lecture notes and an annotated bibliography at the beginning of the class for future reference and can add notes and more detail based on the in-class interaction, as well as a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information. About ATI and the Instructors Our mission here at the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses. Since 1984, ATI has provided leading-edge public courses and onsite technical training to DoD and NASA personnel, as well as contractors. Whether you are a busy engineer, a technical expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of complex systems in a short time. You will become aware of the basic vocabulary essential to interact meaningfully with your colleagues. If you or your team is in need of more technical training, then boost your career with the knowledge needed to provide better, faster, and cheaper solutions for sophisticated DoD and NASA systems. ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology. David D. Walden, ESEP, is an internationally recognized expert in the field of Systems Engineering. He has over 28 years of experience in leadership of systems development as well as in organizational process improvement and quality having worked at McDonnell Douglas and General Dynamics before starting his own consultancy in 2006. He has a BS degree in Electrical Engineering (Valparaiso University) and MS degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (Washington University in St. Louis) and Management of Technology (University of Minnesota). Mr. Walden is a member of the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) and is an INCOSE Expert Systems Engineering Professional (ESEP). He is also a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and Tau Beta Pi. He is the author or coauthor of over 50 technical reports and professional papers/presentations addressing all aspects of Systems Engineering. Dates and Locations The date and location of this course is below: May 8-10, 2012 in Columbia, MD