ATI Now Offers On-Demand Systems Engineering Training

Today’s complex systems present difficult challenges to develop. From military systems to aircraft to environmental and IT systems, development teams must face the challenges with an arsenal of proven methods. Systems Engineering allows us to take advantage of specialization to help reduce cost and schedule in developing successful systems. So, you know that this is […]

Today’s complex systems present difficult challenges to develop. From military systems to aircraft to environmental and IT systems, development teams must face the challenges with an arsenal of proven methods. Systems Engineering allows us to take advantage of specialization to help reduce cost and schedule in developing successful systems.

So, you know that this is an important skill that you need learn; no question about that. 

But, what can you do if your you or your employer simply can’t afford the time or money to take the full SE Fundamentals course offered by ATI?  Well, ATI now has a solution to that problem that may be of interest to you.

Systems Engineering – Fundamentals ON-DEMAND is a concise and portable pre-recorded series of 6 self-contained modules.  The on-demand class is taught by the same instructor who teaches more conventional SE classes for ATI.  Each module is approximately one hour long and covers the underlying attitudes as well as the process definitions that makeup systems engineering.  The model presented is a research-proven combination of the best existing standards.  

This 6-Module course can be played on any browser and is available 24/7/60:  around the clock for 60 days.   You will be able to ask questions of the instructors via email for 90 days from the date of activation.  Activation will occur during normal business hours ET.   The downloadable course slides are yours to keep.

  To learn more about this exciting new opportunity, or to register for this Course, please visit:

On Demand Courses – ATI Courses

And, as always, you can learn about the full set of courses offered by ATI, including other  Systems Engineering Classes which are not offered on-demand, at www.aticourses.com

Don’t Miss Out On This

ATI will be offering Business Management for Scientists and Engineers for the first time on May 24. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to get some great insights from our two esteemed Instructors, Dr. Alan Tribble and Mr. Alan Breitbart. Business Management for Scientists and Engineers will help technical professionals understand how to leverage technical excellence to create […]

ATI will be offering Business Management for Scientists and Engineers for the first time on May 24. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to get some great insights from our two esteemed Instructors, Dr. Alan Tribble and Mr. Alan Breitbart.

Business Management for Scientists and Engineers will help technical professionals understand how to leverage technical excellence to create business success. The course is focused on conveying an understanding of basic business principles and illustrating how they intersect with the technical factors that govern an engineer’s career. This knowledge can make you a more effective engineer, by showing you how to tailor your message to address the key points business leaders look for when making decisions. It can also create opportunities to transition from the role of a technical contributor to that of a business leader. Most of the examples used are from the aerospace and defense industry, but the key lessons would apply equally well to other industries. 

The Instructors for this course are excited about this class.

Dr. Alan Tribble is an Associate Director of Program Management in the aerospace and defense industry. He started his technical career as a space environment effects specialist for a major spacecraft manufacturer and also supported airborne communications and navigation products before making the leap to the business side. He spent several years in international business development before moving into program management. He holds a B.S. in Physics from the University of Arkansas, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Iowa; is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP) by the Project Management Institute; and is the winner of the 2008 James A. Van Allen Space Environments Award from the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. 

Mr. Alan Breitbart is a business development manager in the aerospace and defense industry. He holds a B.S. in Finance from the University of Illinois, and an MBA in International Marketing from Loyola University.

A message from Dr. Tribble………

I’m pleased to report that the second edition of the book Business Management for Scientists and Engineers is finally in press. That means it’s now full speed ahead as we focus on updating and finalizing the presentation material for the course.  

I’m getting excited now that we’re only a month away, and I get even more excited when I get email like the one below that I received over the weekend:  “Having provided engineering services and consulting for a long time, I learned the value of knowing something about business. But I wish that I had started with your webinar or book 20 years ago!” – Mark Pittelkau, Aerospace Control Systems, LLC

Wow! What a great endorsement. I’m looking forward to a great webinar on May 24th and 25th. Hope you can join us.

Please visit Business Management for Scientists and Engineers – ATI Courses to learn more about the course, and to register to attend.

We hope to see you there.

ATI Is Offering Free Stuff

You have heard that technical training is very important, but it often takes a back seat to doing the “real work.”  Wait, what?  Isn’t keeping abreast in your field part of your “real work”?  Doesn’t keeping current in your field better allow you to continue performing at your peak, and allow your company to continue […]

You have heard that technical training is very important, but it often takes a back seat to doing the “real work.”  Wait, what?  Isn’t keeping abreast in your field part of your “real work”?  Doesn’t keeping current in your field better allow you to continue performing at your peak, and allow your company to continue to thrive?  Technical Training is important, especially during the current fiscal climate.

Technical Training Companies, like Applied Technology Institute, are here to help.   If you are a scientist or engineer, we probably have courses that you will find useful and interesting.  You can view our offerings at www.aticourses.com

You have heard that technical training is too expensive.  Wait, what?  The return on your investment in technical training can be immense, so the cost should not be a factor.  Maybe ATI can help here.

You have heard that technical training often is not what is promised, or that the instructor turned out to be a real dud.  Wait, what?  Maybe ATI can help here too.

ATI recently introduced “Free Short Sessions.”  These sessions are live virtual previews of an upcomimg ATI course, presented by the actual instructor.  As the name implies, they are totally free, and as the name also implies, they are short, one hour in duration.  We hold these Free Short Sessions during the mid-day ( Eastern Time ), so that many of our students can attend them with a sandwich in their hand during their lunch break.  These sessions allow students to see what will be covered in the full course, and it allows them to meet the Instructor.  After the short session, the student will know what to expect.

ATI has been conducting two or three Free Short Sessions per month since last Fall, and everyone seems to be very happy with them.  Even if you have no intention of taking the course, consider attending the Free Session so you can become a little smarter on the topic.  Who knows, ATI and the instructor may even convince you to sign up for the course.

You can find a complete schedule of upcoming ATI courses, including our Free Short Sessions, at www.aticourses.com .  You can also register for courses and short sessions from that page.

We hope to see you at an upcoming Free Short Session.  Feel free to bring a sandwich, and a friend.  Dress code is casual. 

Tis The Season

Although most ATI blogs are written for the benefit of students or prospective students, this one is written for the benefit of instructors or prospective instructors.  It should be of interest to students as well as instructors though, as students want to know about their instructors, and even more importantly, today’s student may become tomorrow’s […]

Although most ATI blogs are written for the benefit of students or prospective students, this one is written for the benefit of instructors or prospective instructors.  It should be of interest to students as well as instructors though, as students want to know about their instructors, and even more importantly, today’s student may become tomorrow’s instructor.

As anyone who reads the news knows, many companies are having trouble finding qualified and motivated people to work for them.  Although ATI is blessed with a large cadre of great instructors, we are always looking for new blood, and it can be difficult at times to find new instructors, particularly during holiday seasons when people have more important things to worry about.

So, I was meditating last night, thinking about the attributes that I normally associate with a good instructor, or that I normally look for in a person that we may want to hire as an instructor.  If we can come up with list of those attributes, then we simply need to find a person that has all of those attributes, and hire that person.  Sounds simple.  So, let’s talk about attributes.

First, the person needs to be a Subject Matter Expert on Rocket Science.  Based on one of our current needs, SMEs in Aerodynamic Propulsion and GPS would be very desirable.

Second, the person needs to be highly organized and a very hard worker, for obvious reasons.  The instructor should realize that the demand for classes is not always the same, so there may be very busy times of the year, and there may be slow times.

Third, the person has to like students, and he must enjoy working with students.

Fourth, the person should be mature, with lots of experience, and a demonstrated ability to do his job year after year.

Fifth, the person has to be willing to do some marketing, and help ATI talk to prospective students during the run-up to the course, and maybe even talk to students during our free sessions.

Sixth, the person might live locally in the Baltimore/Washington area, but that is not a hard requirement.  The person can live in very remote location and he can travel as required to meet with students.

With this list in mind, I went to our Data base of a three zillion prospective instructors, and I found a single person that has every one of our desired attributes.  So, let me describe this person named Nick.  For confidentiality reasons, I will not share his last name.  I will talk a little about how he demonstrates each of the attributes.

Nick is an expert in Aerial Ship Design and Operations, in fact, he drives his Ship around annually, and relies on GPS to make a huge number of stops.  Nick is very organized and a hard worker, as demonstrated by the huge number of stops associated with the annual trip that he makes in his Air Ship.  Nick loves working with kids and students and enjoys making them happy.  Nick usually spends the month leading up to his annual trip meeting with kids that he plans to visit on the night of his trip.  At these pre-trip meetings, he and the kids often discuss goals and expectations, so Nick can be better prepared for the start of his trip.  Lastly, although Nick lives in a very remote place, he is very willing to travel great distances, and he has demonstrated that year after year, for so many years.

I tried to contact Nick and see if we can get him to teach for us, but his voice mail indicated that he was too busy to talk to me, but that I should call him back after Christmas when his schedule will be much lighter.  I did not want to wait that long to talk to him, so I decided to visit him, but was unable to find any good deals on flights to his home at the North Pole.

Please take a look at our schedule of upcoming classes here.  Although you will not see Nick’s classes listed yet, please check back often after the holidays to see if we were successful hiring him.

On a serious note, ATI really is always looking for new instructors.  If you think you would like to teach for us, please let us know, so we can talk more about it.

ATI wishes everyone a very happy upcoming holiday season.  We are always here to help you, even during this very busy holiday season.  

Tireless Wireless

Although the concept of Wireless Communications is pretty simple, the method by which it happens is anything but simple.   It’s like the old joke, we all love to eat sausage, but we really would rather not think about how it is made.  We all take wireless communications for granted when we use our cell phone, […]

Although the concept of Wireless Communications is pretty simple, the method by which it happens is anything but simple.   It’s like the old joke, we all love to eat sausage, but we really would rather not think about how it is made.  We all take wireless communications for granted when we use our cell phone, but there are a lot of things happening behind the scenes.

Wireless networks have a lot of advantages over wired networks.   To name a few, wireless networks are cheaper and easier to install and maintain.  They can be accessed at almost any time from almost any place.  And, wireless networks can transmit more data, and transmit it more quickly than a wired network.  The biggest disadvantage of a wireless network is that it can be more susceptible to security threats and data exploitation.

For years, wireless networks have been considered the norm in communication systems, but in the last two years, the importance of wireless networks has increased dramatically due to the pandemic.  As astutely observed by Ahmadi, Katzis, Shakir, Arvaneh, and Gatherer in their April 2020 paper titled  Wireless Communication and the Pandemic: The Story So Far ,  the role of telecommunications in keeping people connected and working has been phenomenal.

The authors point out that the three most significant contributions of wireless networks have been connectivity for healthcare, connectivity for education, and connectivity for retail and supply chain.  The ability to maintain healthcare, education, and retail has been critical to keeping the world up and running with some sense of normalcy during the pandemic.  

For healthcare, 5G mobile technology can reliably connect hospitals, ambulances, and homes to make healthcare service more efficient.  For education, wireless communications allow students of all ages to remain connected with their teachers, whether they are in the local school, or in a college or university half way around the globe.  For Retail, wireless communications allowed people to purchase necessities, and have them delivered to their homes, without undue exposure to the pathogens.  For companies, wireless communications allowed businesses to order and receive things that allowed them to stay open for business, and keep their workforce working.

There will always be a need for wireless communication networks, but that need will be particularly great during the remainder of this pandemic, and whenever the next pandemic comes about.  It is critical that our wireless communications infrastructure be in place now and in the future to meet the ever-increasing demand for bandwidth.

To learn more about wireless communications, consider taking the upcoming ATI Wireless Communications course.  You can read more about this course, and register for it here

And, as always, a complete list of the ATI courses which may interest you can be found here.

Leading The Way, To Diversity

Leading by example, that is one of the things that I admire most. Leading people on, that is something I do not like at all. So, you may be asking, where am I going with this blog?  I am glad you asked. I have been active in STEM recruiting for many years.  I have always […]

Leading by example, that is one of the things that I admire most.

Leading people on, that is something I do not like at all.

So, you may be asking, where am I going with this blog?  I am glad you asked.

I have been active in STEM recruiting for many years.  I have always been of the belief that Science and Engineering stands to benefit immensely by having a diverse work force.  For that reason, I believe that it is important that smart and enthusiastic people be attracted to, and recruited by, the STEM workforce.  This should include males and females, young and old, minorities and non-minorities, democrats and republicans, straight and gay, I could go on and on.  But we must find people who are joining the STEM workforce for the right reasons.  I do not believe that anyone, regardless of their demographics, should be encouraged to enter the STEM workforce solely because jobs are plentiful or salaries are high.  To recruit someone using only these enticements would simply be “leading them on.”  It would set those individuals up for unhappiness and failure, and that would be wrong.  STEM workers need to love STEM, and find a job which allows them to love working in STEM.  A better way for recruiting a diverse STEM workforce would be for a STEM professional from one of the underrepresented groups “leading by example”, thus showing other members of that underrepresented group that STEM careers can be fun and rewarding as well as profitable.

I recently learned about Abagail Harrison, also known as Astronaut Abby.  She is a young  STEM professional from an underrepresented group, and she is effectively leading by example.  She generally does not call attention to the fact that she is a well-paid woman in STEM, but rather, she simply shows her excitement and her achievements in STEM, and thus becomes a role model that similar underrepresented people can aspire to, if, and only if, they are attracted to work in the STEM field.    Take a look at her Mars Generation Page, and you will see what I mean. 

Abagail does occasionally use her blog to salute certain underrepresented groups.  In one blog post, she identifies “11 Women Who Broke Barriers in the Space Industry”.  In another recent blog post, she identified “10 Black Americans Who Made Extraordinary Contributions to Space Exploration.”  In both these cases, she is providing a list of role models who our future STEM workforce can look up to.

So, what can a Technical Training company do to increase diversity in the STEM workforce?  We can continue to track our statistics, and watch to see if the situation is improving.  We look forward to a day in the future when the efforts of people like Abagail Harrison will result in a more diverse STEM workforce, a more diverse set of potential Instructors, and a more diverse Student pool.  When that day comes, ATI will be blessed with the opportunity to have more underrepresented Instructors, and more underrepresented students. 

In the meantime, please support businesses like ours that are making every effort to see more diversity in the STEM workforce.  To learn more about Applied Technology Institute, or to register for one of our courses, or to register for one of our free short courses, please visit us at www.ATIcourses.com.

What we have here is a failure to communicate ( Systems Engineering )

Although the term “Systems Engineering” dates back to the 1940s, and the concept was practiced even earlier than that, there seems to be a growing emphasis on System Engineering, perhaps because Systems have become more complex in recent times.  During my early years of training and practice as an electrical engineer decades ago, I do […]

Although the term “Systems Engineering” dates back to the 1940s, and the concept was practiced even earlier than that, there seems to be a growing emphasis on System Engineering, perhaps because Systems have become more complex in recent times.  During my early years of training and practice as an electrical engineer decades ago, I do not recall hearing or learning much about Systems Engineering, but it seems to have gotten much more well-deserved attention since then.  Feel free to argue these points if you wish, but this has been my observation.

So, what can go wrong if Systems Engineering principles are ignored?  What could possibly go wrong if you have multiple engineers concentrating on their own aspect of the overall design, and no one paying attention to the overall system?    Take a look at this humorous video and see what can happen…

But seriously, though…..

One of the best descriptions of Systems Engineering that I have seen is from INCOSE ( International Council on Systems Engineering ).  It says “Systems engineers are at the heart of creating successful new systems. They are responsible for the system concept, architecture, and design. They analyze and manage complexity and risk. They decide how to measure whether the deployed system actually works as intended. They are responsible for a myriad of other facets of system creation. Systems engineering is the discipline that makes their success possible – their tools, techniques, methods, knowledge, standards, principles, and concepts. The launch of successful systems can invariably be traced to innovative and effective systems engineering.”

So, how can today’s busy and overworked engineer learn more about Systems Engineering?  Or, even if you think you already know everything about Systems Engineering, how can you refresh your knowledge so it is more relevant to the workplace of 2019? 

Applied Technology Institute may have exactly what you are looking for.  ATI recently merged with Honourcode, Inc., and now offers a full line of Systems Engineering courses being taught by original Honourcode instructors, including Eric Honour.

 There is still time to register for our next offering of Applied Systems Engineering, being offered in Columbia, Md starting on September 23, 2019.  This course includes a  hands-on class exercise conducted in small groups. Part A analyzes a system concept and requirements, developing specific test requirements,. Part B creates an effective test program and test procedures for the product system. Part C builds the robotic systems per assembly instructions. Part D implements the test program to evaluate the final robots.  It is a really fun and informative in-class exercise.   Here is a cool video of the System Product built in this class.

Please read more about this opportunity at the following link.

https://aticourses.com/training_classes/applied-systems-engineering-m120/

Bill Gates Reveals The 10 Breakthrough Technologies That Will Change The World in 2019

Here’s the full 2019 selection, as picked by Gates – a comprehensive exploration of each idea will be published in the March/ April edition of MIT Technology Review, released on March 5. 1. Robot dexterity—robot hands that can learn to manipulate unfamiliar objects on their own. 2. Predicting preemies—a simple blood test to warn of […]

Here’s the full 2019 selection, as picked by Gates – a comprehensive exploration of each idea will be published in the March/ April edition of MIT Technology Review, released on March 5.

1. Robot dexterity—robot hands that can learn to manipulate unfamiliar objects on their own.
2. Predicting preemies—a simple blood test to warn of a preterm birth, potentially saving many children’s lives.
3. Gut probe in a pill—a swallowable device that can image the digestive tract and even perform biopsies.
4. Custom cancer vaccines—a treatment that uses the body’s own immune system to target only tumor cells.
5. The cow-free burger—both plant-based and lab-grown meat alternatives that could drastically cut emissions from the food industry.
6. Carbon dioxide catcher—techniques for absorbing CO2 from the air and locking it away that may finally become economic.
7. An ECG on your wrist—the ability for people with heart conditions to continuously monitor their health and get early warnings of problems.
8. Sanitation without sewers—a self-contained toilet that could tackle disease and unpleasant living conditions in much of the developing world.
9. Smooth-talking AI assistants—new advances in natural language processing that make digital assistants capable of greater autonomy.
10. New-wave nuclear power—both fission and fusion reactor designs that could help bring down carbon emissions.

To learn about Technology advances and Artifical Intelligence and Deep Learning go to
https://aticourses.com/catalog_of_all_ATI_courses.htm#engineering

To give credit to the sources, I first learned about this list of advances through an email newsletter published via Bernard Marr.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/bernardmarr/2019/02/27/bill-gates-reveals-the-10-breakthrough-technologies-that-will-change-the-world-in-2019/#34fcc6a6171d

Happy Groundhog Day!

We are halfway between the winter solstice and the spring equinox, also known as, Groundhog day!  If you want to know more about the origins of this tradition, you can find that at the link below, but the story involves bears and badgers, and Germans and Christians, and superstition and science.  You can’t make this […]

We are halfway between the winter solstice and the spring equinox, also known as, Groundhog day!  If you want to know more about the origins of this tradition, you can find that at the link below, but the story involves bears and badgers, and Germans and Christians, and superstition and science.  You can’t make this stuff up, and you can’t tell the story any better than The Old Farmers Almanac.  Check it out at….

https://www.almanac.com/content/groundhog-day-history-meaning-folklore?

It will be a stretch to relate Groundhog day to courses offered by ATI, but we will give it a try.   That pesky groundhog needs to draw on his Remote Sensing abilities in order to have such a wonderful batting average.  If you want to learn more about Remote Sensing, consider one of the Remote Sensing Courses offered by ATi, like perhaps…  Optical & Remote Sensing or Microwave Remote Sensing or Geomatics – GIS, GPS and Remote Sensing or Directions in Space Remote Sensing.

Lastly, and SPOILER ALERT….Spring will be coming early this year.  I can’t wait.

Groundhog Day 2019:The Prediction and Photos

Update on Story -Rover Was Delivered to Mars by an ATLAS Rocket Update

The Applied Technology Institute published (01/23/2019) a story on the Curiosity Rover Was Delivered to Mars in 2015. Space News posted a related article on (01/24/2019).https://www.space.com/43104-mars-rover-opportunity-landing-15th-anniversary.html? This was the original ATI posthttps://aticourses.com/blog/index.php/2019/01/23/recall-that-curi…s-rocket-in-2011/ ‎

The Applied Technology Institute published (01/23/2019) a story on the Curiosity Rover Was Delivered to Mars in 2015. Space News posted a related article on (01/24/2019).
https://www.space.com/43104-mars-rover-opportunity-landing-15th-anniversary.html?

This was the original ATI post
https://aticourses.com/blog/index.php/2019/01/23/recall-that-curi…s-rocket-in-2011/ ‎

Funny Military Dog Photos

I enjoyed these funny Military Dog Photos. These have nothing to do with ATI’s technical training classes, but I have always enjoyed dogs. None of these military dogs will attend ATI’s courses. The Postal Service saw my Funny Military Dog Photos.It will recognize the Military Dogs with stamps this year. There will be one stamp […]

I enjoyed these funny Military Dog Photos. These have nothing to do with ATI’s technical training classes, but I have always enjoyed dogs. None of these military dogs will attend ATI’s courses.

The Postal Service saw my Funny Military Dog Photos.
It will recognize the Military Dogs with stamps this year.

There will be one stamp each for the German shepherd, Labrador retriever, Belgian Malinois and Dutch shepherd breeds, which are all types of military working dogs.

https://www.military.com/undertheradar/2019/01/24/8-funny-working-dog-memes-thatll-make-you-wag-your-tail.html?

New Horizons’ Best-Yet Detailed View of Ultima Thule

The best-yet image of Ultima Thule taken by the wide-angle Multicolor Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) is now online. The image shows a large circular depression, and many smaller depressions. These were not visible in the earlier, lower resolution image. Ultima Thule measures approximately 30 kilometers (18 miles) in diameter, and is irregularly shaped. Even better […]

The best-yet image of Ultima Thule taken by the wide-angle Multicolor Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) is now online. The image shows a large circular depression, and many smaller depressions. These were not visible in the earlier, lower resolution image. Ultima Thule measures approximately 30 kilometers (18 miles) in diameter, and is irregularly shaped. Even better future images are expected.

The principal investigator, Alan Stern, as well as eight other systems designers, teach Spacecraft Design courses for the Applied Technology Institute (ATI or ATIcourses). If you are working in Space and Spacecraft it is good to take classes and learn from real-world experts who have designed and operated successful spacecraft. Why not learn from the best? Click on this blog post to see the New Horizons designers and the specific classes that they teach.

https://aticourses.com/blog/index.php/2018/12/19/new-horizons-spacecraft-approaches-ultima-thule/

Applied Technology Institute has been following the New Horizons Mission to Pluto for years (since launch in 2006). Now New Horizons continued to the Kuiper Belt object (KBO) nicknamed MU69 Ultima Thule. New Horizons fly past and imaged the Ultima Thule on January 1, 2019. High-resolution images are only now being transmitted back and released to the public.

The best source for these images is http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/News-Article.php
This link provides an ongoing source of featured images.

http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/Galleries/Featured-Images/index.php

New Horizons is approximately 4.13 billion miles (6.64 billion kilometers) from Earth, operating normally and speeding away from the Sun (and Ultima Thule) at more than 31,500 miles (50,700 kilometers) per hour. At that distance, a radio signal reaches Earth six hours and nine minutes after leaving the spacecraft.

New Images Show the Record-Breaking Wildfire Season, California Shows Nine New Scars

Space remote sensing can provide the big picture of the Record-Breaking Fires in California. We had family members living in Paradise, California. Their home and their veterinary business were totally destroyed. They have to effectively restart their lives. Those burn scars include the traces of the Camp Fire that destroyed the town of Paradise in […]

Space remote sensing can provide the big picture of the Record-Breaking Fires in California. We had family members living in Paradise, California. Their home and their veterinary business were totally destroyed. They have to effectively restart their lives.

Those burn scars include the traces of the Camp Fire that destroyed the town of Paradise in mid-November. That fire became the deadliest fire in California’s history after it killed at least 85 people.

See
https://www.space.com/42554-california-wildfires-2018-burn-scars-from-space.htm

If you want to learn more about Space and Space-Based Remote Sensing visit our catalog-of-all courses
https://aticourses.com/catalog_of_all_ATI_courses.htm#space

Layered Missile Defense Article and Comments

Missile Defense is a complex problem for the US and US allies such as Israel and Poland. The US Department of Defense has a layered approach of different systems to detect threat missile launches and then to intercept and destroy the incoming missiles. Defense systems include1. Phalanx Close-In Weapons System (CIWS)2. Terminal High Altitude Area Defense […]

Missile Defense is a complex problem for the US and US allies such as Israel and Poland. The US Department of Defense has a layered approach of different systems to detect threat missile launches and then to intercept and destroy the incoming missiles.

 Defense systems include

1. Phalanx Close-In Weapons System (CIWS)

2. Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD)

3. Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense System

4. Israel’s Iron Dome

5. SkyCeptor This is a good summary article sponsored by Raytheon.

https://breakingdefense.com/2018/10/the-present-and-future-of-layered-missile-defense/?

Equally as interesting are the detailed comments from the Breaking Defense readers that appear at the end of the article. The comments focus on costs and the relative costs of the missiles used by the attackers (say for example North Korea or Iran) and the missile defense system missiles. ATI is interested in your comments about the article and open source articles about Missile Defense Systems cost and performance. ATI has many relevant technical training courses that help to understand the technology and components of Missile Defense Systems. These courses can be presented on-site at your facility or at publically scheduled open enrollment courses. Please email your requests to ati@aticourses.com

https://aticourses.com/catalog_of_all_ATI_courses.htm#radar These courses help understand the Missile Defense technologies

1. Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense- https://aticourses.com/Aegis_Ballistic_Missile_Defense.html

2. Aegis Combat System Engineering- https://aticourses.com/Aegis_Combat_System_Engineering.html

3. AESA Radar and Its Applications https://aticourses.com/Modern_AESA_Radara_Principles.html

4. C4ISR Requirements, Principles& Systems https://aticourses.com/c4isr_requirement_principles.htm

5. Electronic Warfare Against the New Threat https://aticourses.com/Electroni_Warfare_Agains_New_Threat_Environment.html

These courses directly focus on missiles and missile defense.

1. Making Decisions in Missile Defense- https://aticourses.com/making_decisions_in_missile_defense.htm

2. Missile Analysis- https://aticourses.com/missile_systems_analysis.htm

3. Missile Guidance https://aticourses.com/Modern_Missile_Guidance.html

4. Missile System Design https://aticourses.com/tactical_missile_design.htm

5. Modeling, Simulation of Aerospace Vehicles https://aticourses.com/Modeling_Simulation_Analysis_of_Aerospace_Vehicles.html

6. Modeling & Simulation of Missiles in 6 DoF https://aticourses.com/Modeling&SimulationMissilesin6DoF.html

7. Tactical Strategic Missile Guidance Please email your requests for more information to ati@aticourses.com

It Will Be Historic: New Horizons Team Prepares for January 1, 2019 Flyby of Kuiper Belt Ultima Thule

Applied Technology Institute (ATI or ATIcourses) has been following the New Horizons Mission to Pluto for years (since launch in 2006). Now New Horizons is on to the Kuiper Belt object (KBO) nicknamed Ultima Thule. New Horizons will fly past and image the Ultima Thule on January 1, 2019. Several of ATI instructors have been […]

Applied Technology Institute (ATI or ATIcourses) has been following the New Horizons Mission to Pluto for years (since launch in 2006). Now New Horizons is on to the Kuiper Belt object (KBO) nicknamed Ultima Thule. New Horizons will fly past and image the Ultima Thule on January 1, 2019.

Several of ATI instructors have been lead scientists for the New Horizons mission. If you are working in Space and Spacecraft it is good to take classes and learn from real-world experts who have designed and operated successful spacecraft.

This is a good article to keep you up to date.
https://www.space.com/42252-new-horizons-team-ultima-thule-flyby.html?

If you have interest ATI can send you updates in on our blog and our newsletter.
https://secure.campaigner.com/CSB/Public/Form.aspx

Background

New Horizons is a space probe launched by NASA on 19 January 2006, to the dwarf planet Pluto and on an escape trajectory from the Sun. It is the first man-made spacecraft to go to Pluto. Its flight took eight years. It arrived at the Pluto–Charon system on July 14, 2015. It flew near Pluto and took photographs and measurements while it passed. At about 1 kilobit per second, it took 15 months to transmit them back to Earth.

ATI instructors who helped plan, develop and engineer the New Horizons Mission. These include the following engineers and scientists, with their bios and links to their related ATI courses.

1. Dr. Alan Stern https://aticourses.com/planetary_science.htm

Dr. Alan Stern is a planetary scientist, space program executive, aerospace consultant, and author. In 2010, he was elected to be the President and CEO of The Golden Spike Company, a commercial space corporation planning human lunar expeditions. Additionally, since 2009, he has been an Associate Vice President at the Southwest Research Institute, and since 2008 has had his own aerospace consulting practice.
Dr. Stern is the Principal Investigator (PI) of NASA’s $720M New Horizon’s Pluto-Kuiper Belt mission, the largest PI-led space mission ever launched by NASA. New Horizons launched in 2006 and arrived on July 14, 2015. Dr. Stern is also the PI of two instruments aboard New Horizons, the Alice UV spectrometer and the Ralph Visible Imager/IR Spectrometer.

2. Eric Hoffman
https://aticourses.com/effective_design_reviews.htm
https://aticourses.com/spacecraft_quality.htm

Eric Hoffman has designed space-borne communications and navigation equipment and performed systems engineering on many APL satellites and communications systems. He has authored over 60 papers and holds 8 patents in these fields. Mr. Hoffman was involved in the proposal (as well as several prior Pluto mission concepts). He chaired the major system-level design reviews (and now teaches the course Effective Design Reviews). He was Space Department Chief Engineer during the concept, design, fabrication, and test of New Horizons. His still actively consulting in the field. He is an Associate Fellow of the AIAA and coauthor of the leading textbook Fundamentals of Space Systems

3. Chris DeBoy https://aticourses.com/Satellite_Communications_Design_Engineering.htm

Chris DeBoy leads the RF Engineering Group in the Space Department at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, and is a member of APL’s Principal Professional Staff. He has over 20 years of experience in satellite communications, from systems engineering (he is the lead RF communications engineer for the New Horizons Mission to Pluto) to flight hardware design for both Low-Earth orbit and deep-space missions. He holds a BSEE from Virginia Tech, a Master’s degree in Electrical Engineering from Johns Hopkins, and teaches the satellite communications course for the Johns Hopkins University.

4. Dr. Mark E. Pittelkau https://aticourses.com/attitude_determination.htm

Dr. Pittelkau was previously with the Applied Physics Laboratory, Orbital Sciences Corporation, CTA Space Systems (now Orbital), and Swales Aerospace. His experience in satellite systems covers all phases of design and operation, including conceptual design, implementation, and testing of attitude control systems, attitude and orbit determination, and attitude sensor alignment and calibration, control-structure interaction analysis, stability and jitter analysis, and post-launch support. His current interests are precision attitude determination, attitude sensor calibration, orbit determination, and optimization of attitude maneuvers. Dr. Pittelkau earned the B.S. and Ph. D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Tennessee Technological University and the M.S. degree in EE from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

5. Douglas Mehoke (and others) https://aticourses.com/spacecraft_thermal_control.htm

Douglas Mehoke is the Assistant Group Supervisor and Technology Manager for the Mechanical System Group in the Space Department at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. He has worked in the field of spacecraft and instrument thermal design for 30 years, and has a wide background in the fields of heat transfer and fluid mechanics. He has been the lead thermal engineer on a variety spacecraft and scientific instruments, including MSX, CONTOUR, and New Horizons. He is presently the Technical Lead for the development of the Solar Probe Plus Thermal Protection System. He was the original thermal engineer for New Horizons, the mechanical system engineer, and is currently the spacecraft damage lead for the flyby Hazard Team. Other JHU/APL are currently teaching the Spacecraft Thermal Control course.

6. Steven Gemeny https://aticourses.com/ground_systems_design.htm

Steve Gemeny is a Principal Program Engineer and a former Senior Member of the Professional Staff at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, where he served as Ground Station Lead for the TIMED mission to explore Earth’s atmosphere and Lead Ground System Engineer on the New Horizons mission to explore Pluto by 2020. Mr. Gemeny is an experienced professional in the field of Ground Station and Ground System design in both the commercial world and on NASA Science missions with a wealth of practical knowledge spanning nearly three decades. Mr. Gemeny delivers his experiences and knowledge to his ATIcourses’ students with an informative and entertaining presentation style. Mr Gemeny is Director Business Development at Syntonics LLC, working in RF over fiber product enhancement, new application development for RF over fiber technology, oversight of advanced DOD SBIR/STTR research and development activities related to wireless sensors and software defined antennas.

7. John Penn https://aticourses.com/fundamentals_of_RF_engineering.html

John Penn is currently the Team Lead for RFIC Design at Army Research Labs. Previously, he was a full-time engineer at the Applied Physics Laboratory for 26 years where he contributed to the New Horizons Mission. He joined the Army Research Laboratory in 2008. Since 1989, he has been a part-time professor at Johns Hopkins University where he teaches RF & Microwaves I & II, MMIC Design, and RFIC Design. He received a B.E.E. from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1980, an M.S. (EE) from Johns Hopkins University (JHU) in 1982, and a second M.S. (CS) from JHU in 1988.

8. Timothy Cole
https://aticourses.com/space_based_lasers.htm
https://aticourses.com/Tactical_Intelligence_Surveillance_Reconnaissance_System_Engineering.htm
https://aticourses.com/Wireless_Sensor_Networking.htm

Timothy Cole is a leading authority with 30 years of experience exclusively working in electro-optical systems as a system and design engineer. While at Applied Physics Laboratory for 21 years, Tim was awarded the NASA Achievement Award in connection with the design, development, and operation of the Near-Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) Laser Radar and was also the initial technical lead for the New Horizons LOng-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI instrument). He has presented technical papers addressing space-based laser altimetry all over the US and Europe. His industry experience has been focused on the systems engineering and analysis associated development of optical detectors, wireless ad hoc remote sensing, exoatmospheric sensor design and now leads ICESat-2 ATLAS altimeter calibration effort.

9. Jay Jenkins https://aticourses.com/spacecraft_solar_arrays.htm

Jay Jenkins is a Systems Engineer in the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate at NASA and an Associate Fellow of the AIAA. His 24-year aerospace career provided many years of experience in design, analysis, and test of aerospace power systems, solar arrays, and batteries. His career has afforded him opportunities for hands-on fabrication and testing, concurrent with his design responsibilities. He was recognized as a winner of the ASME International George Westinghouse Silver Medal for his development of the first solar arrays beyond Mars’ orbit and the first solar arrays to orbit the planet, Mercury. He was recognized with two Best Paper Awards in the area of Aerospace Power Systems.
See some of ATI’s earlier blog posts
https://aticourses.com/blog/index.php/tag/douglas-mehoke/
https://aticourses.com/blog/index.php/tag/mission-operations-center-at-apl/

What was it exactly? Space history’s most fascinating misquote.

This is an interesting article. What was it exactly? History’s most fascinating misquote. “Houston, we have a problem’: The amazing history of the iconic Apollo 13 misquote. https://www.washingtonpost.com/podcasts/retropod/historys-most-fascinating-misquote/ To me, the differences are small, especially since the problem was not resolved at the time of the radio message,and could have lead to the death of […]

This is an interesting article. What was it exactly? History’s most fascinating misquote.

“Houston, we have a problem’: The amazing history of the iconic Apollo 13 misquote.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/podcasts/retropod/historys-most-fascinating-misquote/

To me, the differences are small, especially since the problem was not resolved at the time of the radio message,
and could have lead to the death of the 3 astronauts.

“Houston, we have a problem’

and “Houston, we had a problem’ (That was apparently what was actually said).

If you want to know more about Space and Satellite Design, go to
https://aticourses.com/catalog_of_all_ATI_courses.htm#space

If you want more history od Apollo 13, see
https://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/pao/History/apollo/apo13hist.html

28th Annual INCOSE International Symposium July 7 – July 12, 2018 In Washington DC

INCOSE’s Annual International Symposium is the largest annual gathering of people who do systems engineering for four days of presentations, case studies, workshops, tutorials and panel discussions. The program attracts an international mix of professionals at all levels, and includes practitioners in government and industry, as well as educators and researchers. https://www.incose.org/symp2018/home ATIcouses has more […]
INCOSE’s Annual International Symposium is the largest annual gathering of people who do systems engineering for four days of presentations, case studies, workshops, tutorials and panel discussions. The program attracts an international mix of professionals at all levels, and includes practitioners in government and industry, as well as educators and researchers. https://www.incose.org/symp2018/home ATIcouses has more than 50 courses in Systems Engineering. See https://aticourses.com/catalog_of_all_ATI_courses.htm#systems

Chinese Naval Plans for Subs and Carriers

Do your friends tell you that you surf the Internet too much, or do you tell others that they spend too much time surfing the Internet? Well, it is lucky that someone was surfing, and had the foresight to grab some Chinese Documents during the brief period when they were available online. As reported in […]

Do your friends tell you that you surf the Internet too much, or do you tell others that they spend too much time surfing the Internet?

Well, it is lucky that someone was surfing, and had the foresight to grab some Chinese Documents during the brief period when they were available online. As reported in Popular Science on March 16, “For a brief moment, the China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation (CSIC), put online China’s next big naval projects (but quickly pulled them down).” Sure, some conspiracy theorists may claim this was nothing more than a clever way to spread disinformation, but to others, it represents a wealth of accidentally released information about “ China’s ambitions for a world class navy.” What do you think? The article explains that CSIC is a PLAN shipbuilder with a history of building Carriers and Submarines. It is believed that they will build the Type 095 Nuclear Attack Submarine. “The Type 095 SSN will include new noise reduction measures, like an integrated electric propulsion system and possibly a shaftless rim drive, single hull, and electronic noise cancellation.”
The Chinese continue to be concerned about area denial. The article describes that “To defend Chinese home waters and expand the anti-access/area denial umbrella underwater, CSIC is designing an underwater attack and defense system. It could likely be an armed variant of the “Underwater Great Wall” of UUVs, other maritime robots, and seafloor sensors.”

You can read the full article here….. https://www.popsci.com/china-nuclear-submarine-aircraft-carrier-leak

Or if you want to learn more about the concepts detailed in this article, consider taking an ATI course such as the following.
Submarines and Submariners

Remote Sensing Before and After Hurricane Harvey

The value of remote sensing is shown again with images of before and after Hurricane Harvey. Wow – Take a look! The Ny times featured Digital Globe images of the areas of Texas that were severely hit by Hurricane Harvey. There are also street level photographs to show the local spots before and after Harvey. […]
800px-Harvey_2017-08-25_2231ZThe value of remote sensing is shown again with images of before and after Hurricane Harvey. Wow – Take a look! The Ny times featured Digital Globe images of the areas of Texas that were severely hit by Hurricane Harvey. There are also street level photographs to show the local spots before and after Harvey. https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/08/29/us/houston-before-and-after-hurricane-harvey.html?mcubz=3 If you are interested in learning more about remote sensing from satellites the Applied Technology Institute (ATIcourses) has in-depth technical training programs. https://aticourses.com/Optical_Communications_Systems.htm https://aticourses.com/synthetic_aperture_radar.html https://aticourses.com/hyperspectral_imaging.htm The Washington Post has great images of the the rainfall rate relative to historic averages. The claim is that some Texas areas had a rainfall rate that is a 0.1% chance flood event in a year or 1 in 1000 in a year. “A new analysis from the University of Wisconsin’s Space Science and Engineering Center has determined that Harvey is a 1-in-1,000-year flood event that has overwhelmed an enormous section of Southeast Texas equivalent in size to New Jersey.” Harvey released 40 inches to 45 inches of rain in a few days over areas of Texas or about 24.5 trillion gallons of water. Huge amount! – that is 3.5 ft in some areas. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2017/08/31/harvey-is-a-1000-year-flood-event-unprecedented-in-scale/ The prediction of the frequency of strong flooding is tricky. The definitions and methods matter and can be slanted to make the author’s point. See the many comments to the above article. By some measures this is the third 500 year flood in 3 years for Houston. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2017/08/29/houston-is-experiencing-its-third-500-year-flood-in-3-years-how-is-that-possible/ Please update this post with useful articles about the analysis of the Harvey rainfall and flooding in comparison to other major US flood events.

Protecting Against the Cyber Insider Threat

This is a good article on protecting against the cyber insider threat. I quote below the action items, but you should read the full article for more insight. https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/cyber-insider-threat-mellisa-wagner?trk=prof-post What you can do There are ways you can protect your organization’s (and your customer’s) data. It’s not difficult, but it will require diligence. On-board your […]

This is a good article on protecting against the cyber insider threat. I quote below the action items, but you should read the full article for more insight.

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/cyber-insider-threat-mellisa-wagner?trk=prof-post

What you can do

There are ways you can protect your organization’s (and your customer’s) data. It’s not difficult, but it will require diligence.
  1. On-board your employees in a consistent manner that properly trains them in cyber vulnerabilities
  2. Maintain this training regularly
  3. Assess your organization’s and employee’s weakness so you can better mitigate cyber vulnerabilities and risks
  4. Understand cyber risks
Your IT professionals aren’t the true gatekeepers – your employees are!  ATIcourses offers several practical cyber security training programs that can help with the ongoing need for cyber technical training.  Cyber Leadership Course(CLC) Cyber Security -Practical Boot Camp Cyber Security, Communications & Networking courses

Humor for the day. Bill Gates and Steve Jobs in Heaven.

Jim Jenkins  President ATIcourses Technical Training : defense & engineering courses.. I saw this as a LinkedIn post and thought it was funny. Originally posted to LinkedIn by Dr. Robert Mueller Bill Gates: “So, how’s heaven, Steve?” Steve Jobs: “Great ! It just doesn’t have any wall or fence.” Bill Gates: “So…?” Steve Jobs: “So, […]
Jim Jenkins  President ATIcourses Technical Training : defense & engineering courses.. I saw this as a LinkedIn post and thought it was funny. Originally posted to LinkedIn by Dr. Robert Mueller
Humor - Bill Gates and Steve Jobs discussing Heaven
Humor – Bill Gates and Steve Jobs discussing Heaven
Bill Gates: “So, how’s heaven, Steve?” Steve Jobs: “Great ! It just doesn’t have any wall or fence.” Bill Gates: “So…?” Steve Jobs: “So, we don’t need any Windows and Gates. I’m sorry, Bill, I didn’t mean to offend you.” Bill Gates: “It’s ok Steve, but I heard a rumor.” Steve Jobs: “Oh, what rumor?” Bill Gates: “That nobody is allowed to touch Apple there, and there are no Jobs in heaven.” Steve Jobs : “Oh no, definitely there are, but only no-pay Jobs. Therefore definitely no Bill in heaven as everything will be provided free…. Lori Ruff – Okay… that’s creative. 🙂 Daniel Mumby “That StartUp Guy    “”The wifi is much better now”

Video – New Test Success – Navy’s Naval Integrated Fire Control-Counter Air concept (NIFC-CA)

Video – New Test Success – Navy’s Naval Integrated Fire Control-Counter Air concept (NIFC-CA) ATI teaches more than 50 courses on EW, Missile Systems and Radar Tracking. We thought this article would interest our students. This test combines the F-35B EW system with the Aegis System in a new way. https://news.usni.org/2016/09/13/video-successful-f-35-sm-6-live-fire-test-points-expansion-networked-naval-warfare Using targeting information transmitted […]
Video – New Test Success – Navy’s Naval Integrated Fire Control-Counter Air concept (NIFC-CA) ATI teaches more than 50 courses on EW, Missile Systems and Radar Tracking. We thought this article would interest our students. This test combines the F-35B EW system with the Aegis System in a new way. https://news.usni.org/2016/09/13/video-successful-f-35-sm-6-live-fire-test-points-expansion-networked-naval-warfare Using targeting information transmitted from the Marine Corps F-35B, the Navy’s Aegis test site at the White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico launched an SM-6 anti-air missile and struck a target representing an adversarial fighter. F-35 sensors include the Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) radar capable of air-to-air operations, air-to-surface operations, and a broad spectrum of electronic warfare and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance missions. The unmodified F-35 picked up the target with its own sensors and routed the track via the fighter’s Multifunction Advanced Data Link (MADL pronounced: MAHdel) to the Navy’s USS Desert Ship (LLS-1) test platform running the Baseline 9 Aegis Combat System. Lockheed and the Navy attached a MADL antenna to the combat system to receive the track information that fed the information to the SM-6. https://news.usni.org/2016/09/13/video-successful-f-35-sm-6-live-fire-test-points-expansion-networked-naval-warfare To learn more about the F35 go to https://www.f35.com/ https://www.f35.com/media/photos To learn more about ATI’s more than  50 courses on EW, Missile Systems and Radar Tracking https://aticourses.com/catalog_of_all_ATI_courses.htm#radar      

Zumwalt Destroyer Moving Toward Commissioning

The Navy gave a first look inside the stealthy and futuristic Zumwalt destroyer on Friday during the ship’s first port stop at a Rhode Island naval station. The 610-foot-long warship has an angular shape to minimize its radar signature and cost more than $4.4 billion. It’s the most expensive destroyer built for the Navy. It’s […]

The Navy gave a first look inside the stealthy and futuristic Zumwalt destroyer on Friday during the ship’s first port stop at a Rhode Island naval station.

160908-N-CS971-005 NEWPORT, R.I. (Sept. 8, 2016) The guided-missile destroyer Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Zumwalt (DDG 1000) arrives at Naval Station Newport, Rhode Island during its maiden voyage from Bath Iron Works Shipyard in Bath, Maine. The port visit marks Zumwalt’s first stop before the ship ultimately sails to her new homeport of San Diego. During the transit, the ship is scheduled to take part in training operations, a commissioning ceremony in Baltimore and various additional port visits. Zumwalt is named for former Chief of Operations Elmo R. Zumwalt and is the first in a three-ship class of the Navy’s newest, most technologically advanced multi-mission guided-missile destroyers. (U.S. Navy photo by Haley Nace/Released)

The 610-foot-long warship has an angular shape to minimize its radar signature and cost more than $4.4 billion. It’s the most expensive destroyer built for the Navy. It’s headed from Naval Station Newport to Baltimore, where it will be commissioned in October before going to its homeport in San Diego. It was built at Bath Iron Works in Maine.

It is on its way to its commissioning in Baltimore on Oct. 15. The USS Zumwalt is docked at Naval Station Newport on Thursday after its arrival from Maine. The first of three Zumwalt class destroyers, the Zumwalt is about 1½ times the size of the previous Arleigh Burke class destroyers but is manned by only 147 sailors, about half the size of a Burke crew.

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/5780f73caee642cdbab5e4e7dd83a082/us-navy-gives-look-inside-futuristic-44b-zumwalt-destroyer

Interestingly enough, we blogged about this as a “ship of the future” in 2014:

https://aticourses.com/blog/index.php/2014/10/01/navys-stealth-ship-of-the-future-zumwalt/

This link discuss the third Zumwalt ship. Navy consideration of scrapping third ship of Zumwalt-class destroyer to save money.

http://www.militaryaerospace.com/articles/2015/09/zumwalt-class-destroyer.html

The following was posted to USNA-AT-LARGE Yahoo group and was written by Roger Barnett, Professor Emeritus, Naval War College.

Visited Zumwalt yesterday–not USS Zumwalt yet.  (That happens on October 15 in Baltimore:

Local news write-up here:  https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/122348/State%20of%20the%20art%20ship%20visits%20Naval%20Station%20Newport%20%7C%20Page%20One%20%7C%20newportri.com.pdf

Wore my USS Texas  (BB-35) shirt because I was interested in a comparison of that battleship and the new destroyer.  Here’s a bare-bones look at size, complement, and cost:

Zumwalt (2016)     USS Texas (1914)
Length                610ft              573ft
Beam                   81ft               95ft
Displacement     16,000T        27,000T
Complement       147                1,042
Cost                     ≈$4b              $11m in 1912 (≈$275m today)

•  Toured the ship with a group of 25.  Was onboard for about 30 minutes, toured forecastle–no ground tackle in view; bridge–3 watchstanders when ship is underway, (also three watchstanders in engineering, I was told)  very poor visibility from small windows, but large video screens above the windows, all the way around.  Not possible to position lookouts out in the elements.  External visibility must be minimal at night.  Then to Combat:  About 15 workstations in large room, about 20 feet high.  CO’s battlestation on centerline of space, 2/3ds of way back.  Large video screens all around.

•  Ship has complement of 147.  There is no such thing as a separate condition 3; ship is always at condition 3 when underway–owing to automation, no additional stations to fill.

•  No non-rated aboard. All enlisted are E-4 to E-9.  Enlisted live in 4-person compartments, each with its own head.  Officers–except CO, XO, Unit CDR, and Chief of Staff–and most senior CPO’s in 2-person staterooms, en suite.  Ship has about 60 heads (!), which are cleaned by occupants.  I did not ask who cleans CO’s and Unit CDR’s heads.

•  Weapons: 80 VLS launch cells located on the periphery of the ship–outside the lifelines, which are removed when the ship is underway–in the forward third of the ship.  Also two 155mm advanced gun systems in two mounts forward and two 30-mm gun systems that are for defense against small craft swarm tactics (https://news.usni.org/2014/08/05/navy-swaps-anti-swarm-boat-guns-ddg-1000s).  Can embark two MH-60 helos; can also carry drones, which would be embarked as a detachment with controllers, but not simultaneously with helos.  Can carry two RHIBs.  Ship had only one aboard as we saw when we visited the boat deck.  Tour guide said they were investigating loading V-22 Ospreys, but there was an issue with the exhausts damaging the nonskid on the flight deck.  (NFI)

•  Very large composite superstructure, housing SPY-radar system, must be vulnerable to attack with high velocity frag warheads.  SPY not yet installed.  Small navigation radars fore and aft are temporary until SPY system is installed while ship is in San Diego.

•  Ship’s firefighting suite uses fresh water.  Officer conducting tour said he did not know why, except that salt water was more conductive and more damaging to electronics than fresh water.  This was an eye-opener for me, who tends to believe that a fire aboard ship takes precedence to concerns about harming the electronic suite.  The mindset, however, is that the electronic system is life, and without it you will be sure to die, so it is always the top priority.  If someone knows more about this than I do, please enlighten!

•  Electric drive; gas turbine prime movers.

•  Other specs well laid out

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zumwalt-class_destroyer#cite_note-usni5aug14-8

•  Ship class at inception was for 32 ships, now the plan is to build 3.  Follows fairly closely the fate of the B-2 bomber.

Amazing Video of the Planning and Work for B-29 Bombing of Japan during WW II.

This is an amazing video for World War II. The Academy Award-nominated documentary, which shows the 21st Bombing Command and its role in the B-29 bombing of Japan. This film is about 35 minutes long.  To think of 600 B-29s all taking off from 3 locations and coordinating to bomb Japan at one time to fly […]
This is an amazing video for World War II. The Academy Award-nominated documentary, which shows the 21st Bombing Command and its role in the B-29 bombing of Japan. This film is about 35 minutes long.  To think of 600 B-29s all taking off from 3 locations and coordinating to bomb Japan at one time to fly 3000 miles is beyond imagination. Look at the planning and control without the computers and GPS of today. This is worth viewing for anyone working in military research and planning. The P-51 fighter  & B29 bomber footage is remarkable. We all owe a great debt of gratitude to the Greatest Generation. https://archive.org/details/TheLastBomb1945 This was recently posted by USNA-At-Large group and is worth viewing. The group is a good source of Navy- and Defense- related information.

Wow! The world’s first website went online 25 years ago Aug 6, 1991

On this day 25 years ago the world’s first website (Aug 6, 1991)  went live to the public. The site, created by Sir Tim Berners-Lee, was a basic text page with hyperlinked words that connected to other pages. We have come a long way baby! Berners-Lee used the public launch to outline his plan for […]
On this day 25 years ago the world’s first website (Aug 6, 1991)  went live to the public. The site, created by Sir Tim Berners-Lee, was a basic text page with hyperlinked words that connected to other pages. We have come a long way baby! Berners-Lee used the public launch to outline his plan for the service, which would come to dominate life in the twenty-first century. See the story at the link below. I am impressed and I lived through that period. The current ATIcourses.com web site and domain name was created in July 1999. There was a web site hosted on Catalog.com/hitekweb for a number of years prior to 1999. Applied Technology Institute was founded in 1984, more than 32 years ago. It has been an exciting period as the web, email and technology exploded with potential http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/2016/08/06/the-worlds-first-website-went-online-25-years-ago-today/   Jim Jenkins  https://aticourses.com/about.htm