Shutdown Reaches Mars: Curiosity Rover Will Stop

…but not without some major snark! Just before 11 p.m. Monday night, NASA’s Voyager 2 spacecraft sent this message via Twitter: Due to government shutdown, we will not be posting or responding from this account. Farewell, humans. Sort it out yourselves. — NASAVoyager2 (@NASAVoyager2) October 1, 2013 Of course, it wasn’t Voyager sending the tweet, it […]
The parachute for the Mars Science Laboratory mission to Mars. The Mars Curiosity Rover will stop collecting data during the shutdown. Photo by NASA/JPL-Caltech.
…but not without some major snark! Just before 11 p.m. Monday night, NASA’s Voyager 2 spacecraft sent this message via Twitter:
Due to government shutdown, we will not be posting or responding from this account. Farewell, humans. Sort it out yourselves. — NASAVoyager2 (@NASAVoyager2) October 1, 2013
Of course, it wasn’t Voyager sending the tweet, it was Voyager’s handlers here on Earth. But the slight whiff of snarkiness coming from the intrepid spacecraft that’s hurtling through deep space — and depending very much on government funding to do so — highlights the powerful impact this shutdown has on science and the nation’s scientific agencies. At NASA, Mission Control in Houston remains active to support the crew aboard the International Space Station. But nearly all other space agency operations have ground to a halt. NASA has 18,250 civil servants around the country, and the furlough means 90 percent are now sitting at home wondering what will happen at next. Visiting nasa.gov redirects users to a placeholder screen, saying that the website is not available, “due to the lapse in federal government funding.” The Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s website still functions, but will not be updated. “We also cannot respond to comments/questions. We sincerely regret this inconvenience,” adds JPL. ABC News reached out to its press contacts and sources involved at NASA but only received an automated response in reply. “I am in furlough status; therefore, I am unable to respond to your message at this time,” wrote one employee. Spacecrafts and satellites not yet launched are grounded and while the Hubble Space Telescope will continue peering into far flung galaxies, no one will be there to collect the data.
“If a satellite mission has not yet been launched, work will generally cease on that project,” NASA’s shutdown plan reads. “The extent of support necessary and the time needed to safely cease project activities will depend on whether any of the activities are of a hazardous nature (e.g., parts of the satellite may need to be cooled).”
Work preparing for the Mars MAVEN mission, which was slated for a Nov. 18 launch, for example, has stopped, and could delay the craft’s planned mission to Mars. How did furlough effect you?  Please let us know by commenting below.
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ATI TRAINING PROGRAM ON SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS FOCUSES ON KEY TECHNICAL SKILLS FOR ENGINEERS AND MANAGERS

Riva, Md., [DATE]—An upcoming course is just the ticket for satellite and spacecraft engineers who are looking to build on their technical expertise with broadly marketable skills that will enable them to take on more expansive roles in the satellite communications industry. Developed by Applied Technology Institute (ATIcourses), a leading provider of classroom-based and online […]
Riva, Md., [DATE]—An upcoming course is just the ticket for satellite and spacecraft engineers who are looking to build on their technical expertise with broadly marketable skills that will enable them to take on more expansive roles in the satellite communications industry. Developed by Applied Technology Institute (ATIcourses), a leading provider of classroom-based and online training programs geared for space industry professionals, “Satellite Communications Design and Engineering” will combine a thorough overview of how communications satellites function with information-packed modules devoted to the practical skills necessary to design and operate satellite communications networks. Participants in the program, set for October 15-17, 2013, in Columbia, Md., will learn the mathematical and other skills necessary to perform and verify link budget calculations, which are essential to ensuring that a satellite connection can carry data efficiently and reliably. They will also gain the ability to evaluate satellite networks independently and in collaboration with other satellite professionals. In addition, attendees will learn how Earth stations and transponders function, gain an understanding of phenomena such as rain fade, and develop a grasp of the forces that affect how a satellite orbits the Earth. The three-day course will be taught by Chris DeBoy, head of the RF Engineering Group in the Space Department at the renowned Applied Physics Laboratory run by The Johns Hopkins University. DeBoy is an expert in the development of satellite communications systems and spacecraft designed for deep-space missions. He is the lead RF communications engineer for NASA’s New Horizons Mission to Pluto. DeBoy replaces another space industry veteran at the helm of the course, which is offered periodically by ATI. Robert Nelson, a satellite communications expert, author, and consultant, taught the program until his passing earlier this year. Further details about the program, including registration and cost information, are at www.aticourses.com/Satellite_Communications_Design_Engineering.htm. About Applied Technology Institute (ATIcourses or ATI) ATIcourses is a national leader in professional development seminars in the technical areas of space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, engineering, and signal processing. Since 1984, ATIcourses has presented leading-edge technical training to defense and NASA facilities, as well as DOD and aerospace contractors. ATI’s programs create a clear understanding of the fundamental principles and a working knowledge of current technology and applications. ATI offers customized on-site training at your facility anywhere in the United States, as well as internationally, and over 200 annual public courses in dozens of locations. ATI is proud to have world-class experts instructing courses. For more information, call 410-956-8805 or 1-888-501-2100 (toll free), or visit them on the web at www.ATIcourses.com. Note: Accredited media are invited to attend for free.


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NASA’s Robotic Future: Autonomous Robots with Fancy Cameras

Applied Technology Institute (ATI Courses) offers a variety of courses on Space, Satellite & Aerospace Engineering. Are you interested in the developments in those industries?  If yes, keep on reading! Computers are getting smarter. We already have IBM Watson destroying its human competition in quiz shows, but what about the natural sense of curiosity that comes […]
Applied Technology Institute (ATI Courses) offers a variety of courses on Space, Satellite & Aerospace Engineering. Are you interested in the developments in those industries?  If yes, keep on reading! Computers are getting smarter. We already have IBM Watson destroying its human competition in quiz shows, but what about the natural sense of curiosity that comes with scientific inquiry? The engineers and scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory are working on building robots that will “know what’s desirable to observe.” That comes by way of computer scientist and geologist Kiri Wagstaff of NASA JPL. As advanced as the Mars Curiosity rover may be, its complete agenda is still being set each day by a group of humans here on Earth. The future of exploration on other planets will be very different. As Wagstaff puts it, the robot will be able to “graduate from being a remote instrument to actually being a field assistant.” A big part of that transition comes by way of developments like their TextureCam. Here is a 3D camera system that allows the exploration robots to make an educated guess as to what should be worth investigating further. This is based on looking for novel colors or textures, compared to previous images. If it’s new, it’s probably worth looking at and this line of thinking seems to be working based on early tests in earthly deserts. By allowing the on-board computers to make their own decisions, NASA can be far more efficient; normally, the two-way communication to a probe on Mars can take up to 40 minutes and they’re often restricted to one transmission a day due to bandwidth constraints. Instead of waiting for the humans to tell it what to do, the next-gen Mars rover can decided on its own. Of course, we’d still be here to correct its course if needed, because human curiosity cannot (yet) be fully replicated by a machine. Source : Wired  

The New Age 3D Printer To Be Sent To International Space Station By NASA

It is no secret that 3D printers are the new fab. Everybody is interested in them. As a matter of fact, one of our friends has recently purchased one and gave us a demonstration. We were floored! 3D printing is a process of melting plastic filament and creating solid objects by building them up in […]
It is no secret that 3D printers are the new fab. Everybody is interested in them. As a matter of fact, one of our friends has recently purchased one and gave us a demonstration. We were floored!
3D printing is a process of melting plastic filament and creating solid objects by building them up in very thin layers.
The technology is used in a wide range of industries from construction to aerospace, and is now starting to make its way into space.
It is well known that NASA wants to take 3D printers into space. The technology would be highly useful to the men and women on the International Space Station as they would be able to quickly repair components with plastic replacements. There is a problem though – how do you 3D print something in a zero gravity environment? In a video released by NASA, the agency goes into how its experimenting with 3D printers here on earth to ensure that the technology will be able to function in zero gravity environments. Here’s what NASA has to say about its latest endeavor:The goal of 3-D printing is to take this capability to microgravity for use on the International Space Station. In space, whatever astronauts have available on orbit is what they have to use — but just like on Earth, parts break or get lost. When that happens, there’s a wait for replacement parts, or the need to have multiple spares that have to be launched. The ability to conduct 3-D printing in space could change all of that. NASA plans to launch the first 3D printer into space in June of next year. It will hopefully be the first of many as the space agency plans to use 3D printers in a number of space missions over the next few years and decades. In fact, one of its most ambitious plans is to create a 3D printer that extrudes food to make pizzas for long manned space flights.


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ATI Courses Instructor Of The Month, Vincent L. Pisacane, PhD

Dr. Vincent Pisacane was the Robert A. Heinlein Professor of Aerospace Engineering at the United States Naval Academy where he taught courses in space exploration, space systems, and the design of spacecraft. He was previously at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory where he was the Head of the Space Department, Director of the […]
Dr. Vincent Pisacane was the Robert A. Heinlein Professor of Aerospace Engineering at the United States Naval Academy where he taught courses in space exploration, space systems, and the design of spacecraft. He was previously at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory where he was the Head of the Space Department, Director of the Institute for Advanced Science and Technology in Medicine, and Assistant Director for Research and Exploratory Development. He concurrently held a joint academic appointment in biomedical engineering at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. He has been the principal investigator on several NASA funded grants. He is a fellow of the AIAA. He currently teaches graduate courses in space systems at the Johns Hopkins University. In addition he has taught short courses and webinars on these topics. He has authored over a hundred research papers on space systems and bioastronautics and several books.
EDUCATION B.A.                                    Mechanical Engineering                                                Drexel University M.S.                   Applied Mechanics/Mathematics             Michigan State University Ph.D.                Applied Mechanics/Physics                         Michigan State University Post-Grad       Aeronautical Engineering                             Princeton University Post Doc.         Electrical Engineering                                     Johns Hopkins University   BOOKS Pisacane, VL, Spacecraft Systems Design and Engineering, In R. A. Myers (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Physical Science and Technology, Third Edition. vol, 15, Academic Press, 2002.   Pisacane, VL, and RC Moore, Eds. Fundamentals of Space Systems, Oxford University Press, (Author of three chapters and co-author of one chapter out of 14 separately authored chapters), 1994.   Pisacane, VL, (Editor) Fundamentals of Space Systems, Oxford University Press, Second Edition (Author of four chapters out of 16 separately authored), June 2005.   Pisacane, VL, Space Environment and its Effects on Space Systems, AIAA Press, August 2008. (Translated to Chinese, 2011)   Pisacane, VL, Systems Engineering and Requirements Analysis, in M Macdonald and V Badescu (Eds), The International Handbook of Space Technology, Praxis and Springer-Verlag, 2013.   COURSES TAUGHT FOR APPLIED TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE

Fundamentals Of Space Systems & Space Subsystems
Bioastronautics: Space Exploration and its Effects on the Human Body
Space Environment & It’s Effects On Space Systems
Space Radiation & It’s Effects On Space Systems & Astronauts
Space Systems – Intermediate Design
 

 

 


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NASA recruits record number of female astronauts

Applied Technology Institute (ATI Courses) offers a variety of courses in Space, Satellite & Aerospace Engineering.  We think the news below would be of interest to our readers. For the first time in history, US space agency NASA has selected a record high of four women among eight new astronauts to join the agency. The […]
Applied Technology Institute (ATI Courses) offers a variety of courses in Space, Satellite & Aerospace Engineering.  We think the news below would be of interest to our readers. For the first time in history, US space agency NASA has selected a record high of four women among eight new astronauts to join the agency. The announcement came on the eve of the 30th anniversary of the launch of the first American woman into space, Sally Ride, who passed away last year. Nicole Aunapu Mann, 35, a major in the US Marine Corps, Jessica Meir, 35, an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School, Christina Hammock, 34, a station chief at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and Anne McClain, 34, a major in the US Army, along with their four new male colleagues, were the first group out of 6 100 applicants selected by NASA in over four years. Not only are these four ladies part of the highest number of new female astronauts recruited, Hammock and McClain are also the youngest females ever recruited. The astronauts begin their training in August at Johnson Space Centre in Houston and they will help lead the first human mission to an asteroid in the 2020s, and then Mars.
From left clockwise: Christina Hammock, Anne McClain, Nicole Aunapu Mann and Jessica Meir.

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The Antares Rocket Finally Launched Over The Weekend, And Put Something Pretty Amazing Into Space

Applied Technology Institute (ATICourses) offers many courses on Space & Satellite Technology. We thought the news below would be of interest to our readers. It took Orbital Sciences a few tries, but they successfully launched their Antares rocket on Sunday. The rocket’s primary payload was just a “mass simulator” that was standing in for their […]
Applied Technology Institute (ATICourses) offers many courses on Space & Satellite Technology. We thought the news below would be of interest to our readers. It took Orbital Sciences a few tries, but they successfully launched their Antares rocket on Sunday. The rocket’s primary payload was just a “mass simulator” that was standing in for their Cygnus capsule, but it also launched three of NASA’s new PhoneSat micro satellites. The PhoneSats are built with off-the-shelf items like Android phones, and NASA wants you to help track them. Jasper Wolfe of NASA called the Phonesat project, “a kind of demonstration effort.” He also says that on a personal note, he thinks they’re cool. They show that future spacecraft could potentially make use of cheap and readily available consumer equipment such as smartphones. The Antares launch put three of the PhoneSats named “Alexander”, “Graham”, and “Bell” into orbit. Two of these are PhoneSat 1.0 models, with the third — we assume Bell — being a PhoneSat 2.0 prototype. The 1.0 models are built around HTC Nexus One phones running on Android and run on battery power. The 2.0 beta PhoneSat is powered with solar panels and has a Samsung Nexus S at its heart. The 2.0 also has a GPS receiver and electro magnets that interact with the Earth’s magnetic field. It can also be controlled from Earth while in flight using reaction wheels. While the PhoneSats are in orbit, NASA is encouraging amateur radio operators to participate in the mission by downloading and uploading packets of data to and from the tiny satellites. Interested in taking your Ham radio hobby to the next level? More information on that can be found at Phonesat.org. The site also features a map showing the orbital path of Alexander, Graham, and Bell.
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NASA’s Second Space Apps Challenge: 2 Days Left To Register!

Applied Technology Institute (ATICourses) offers a variety of courses on Space, Satellite & Aerospace Engineering.  We think the news below would be of interest to our visitors. Calling all space geeks: The hackathon is on! Bring your dreams, your drink (the caffeinated kind, of course) and your skills to any one of 75 locations in 41 […]
Applied Technology Institute (ATICourses) offers a variety of courses on Space, Satellite & Aerospace Engineering.  We think the news below would be of interest to our visitors. Calling all space geeks: The hackathon is on! Bring your dreams, your drink (the caffeinated kind, of course) and your skills to any one of 75 locations in 41 countries around this world – or the whole Blue Marble if you choose to join virtually – to the second annual International Space Apps Challenge, April 20-21. For 48 hours, some of the most active minds on the planet will come together to crowdsource fun and maybe even life-sustaining solutions to some of the most complex space exploration problems:    
  • Gotta eat: Develop a deployable greenhouse that could be used for an M&M mission (Moon or Mars).
  • Bootstrap space: Develop the game Moonvilleto and virtually build a self-sustaining lunar industry.
  • Seven minutes of sheer science: Conceive of how to make use of 150 kilograms of ejectable mass that also achieves a scientific or technical objective during the entry and landing phase of a Mars mission.
  • Diggin’ dirt: Using soil testing approaches, develop “a simple means for users to feedback their soil measurements using web/phone technology.”
  • Duck, duck, goose: Create a poultry management system for backyard farmers. Hey – whether you’re on the Moon, Mars, or Macedonia (yes, that’s one of the locations this year), you gotta what? Eat.
  • Meteor, meteor, duck: Create an app to use during meteor showers that allows observers to trace the location, color and size of the shooting stars.
Those are just some of the more than 50 space challenges posed for the 2013 event, and the invitation is open to all to bring their own. Organized by NASA, with support from the space agencies of Europe, Canada and others, the idea behind the challenge is to create teams with an eye on human exploration that can “do something better than any of us can do on our own.” For a comprehensive explanation of how it will work, where to go, and how to register, go the space apps challenge website. Note: you’ll have to be a registered participant to submit a project for judging.
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Asteroid in a Bag! Obama Reveals New Plan For NASA.

Applied Technology Institute (ATICourses) offer a variety of courses on Space, Satellite & Aerospace Engineering.  We think the news below would be of interest to our visitors.   Does President Barack Obama intend to capture an asteroid and place it into lunar orbit? It is confirmed that Obama’s forthcoming budget includes a $100 million plan […]
Not on Obama's watch, says Obama.
Applied Technology Institute (ATICourses) offer a variety of courses on Space, Satellite & Aerospace Engineering.  We think the news below would be of interest to our visitors.   Does President Barack Obama intend to capture an asteroid and place it into lunar orbit? It is confirmed that Obama’s forthcoming budget includes a $100 million plan to tow an asteroid into moon orbit.  And this will be done for freedom—that is, for the purpose of saving the planet Earth from complete annihilation. An excerpt (emphasis mine):
Tucked inside President Barack Obama’s proposed federal budget for next fiscal year is about $100 million to jump start a program scientists say is the next step towards humans establishing a permanent settlement in space. That, at least, is what U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson says we’re likely to see when the White House unveils its fiscal year 2014 budget around the middle of next week. Nelson has been briefed by scientists… In a nutshell, the plan in NASA’s hands calls for catching an asteroid with a robotic spacecraft and towing it back toward Earth, where it would then be placed in a stable orbit around the moon. Next, astronauts aboard America’s Orion capsule, powered into space by a new monster rocket, would travel to the asteroid where there could be mining activities, research into ways of deflecting an asteroid from striking Earth, and testing to develop technology for a trip to deep space and Mars.   “This is part of what will be a much broader program,” Nelson said today, during a visit in Orlando. “The plan combines the science of mining an asteroid, along with developing ways to deflect one, along with providing a place to develop ways we can go to Mars.”
The president already has established the goal of landing astronauts on a near-Earth asteroid by 2025. This new plan would bump up the date to 2021. As in, not a moment to waste. Nelson, a former astronaut, has an affinity for asteroids and United States asteroid policy; last month, he was on a Senate panel that grilled scientists about the consequences of an asteroid striking earth. He was keen to know if there is any way for humankind to fight back against asteroid aggression. Obama has often been slammed for supposedly not being bold, for not being tough enough with foes. But if Nelson is right, Obama is ready to do what’s necessary to take on the asteroid threat and make the United States the first nation to claim a giant space rock. ForgetSpock or Luke Skywalker; he’s going the full Bruce Willis:

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NASA Can No Longer Afford Public Outreach

One of the most lasting memories of my husband’s childhood was his obsession with space. This is nothing new, really. Lots of kids like space. This shouldn’t be a surprise. The thing is, it may be common, but a love of space never feels common. On the contrary, it feels special and grand. Sure, there […]
One of the most lasting memories of my husband’s childhood was his obsession with space. This is nothing new, really. Lots of kids like space. This shouldn’t be a surprise. The thing is, it may be common, but a love of space never feels common. On the contrary, it feels special and grand. Sure, there are millions of other people who share that love, maybe billions, but compared to the universe, that’s still a pretty exclusive club. So is just being from Earth. While he may have found out that space is one of the most fascinating things (or combination of things) ever on his own, the catalyst for this revelation in him was when his school was visited by an astronaut. He doesn’t even remember his name, but remembers him talking about going up on the shuttle, doing experiments you can’t do on Earth, how we can one day start exploring again. Unfortunately, more kids will not have the same opportunity he did. Due to the Sequester, NASA is having to cut all of their public outreach. No more school visits and informational websites, no more videos, no more attempts to promote work in STEM fields. All gone in an instant. How does this make you feel? Please comment below.

It’s official: We are an interstellar species

Applied Technology Institute (ATICourses) offers a variety of Space & Satellite related courses.  We thought the news below could be of interest to our readers. In recent months it has appeared likely that Voyager 1, a probe launched in 1977, has gone beyond our solar system but now it’s official: the spacecraft has left the building. This […]
Applied Technology Institute (ATICourses) offers a variety of Space & Satellite related courses.  We thought the news below could be of interest to our readers. In recent months it has appeared likely that Voyager 1, a probe launched in 1977, has gone beyond our solar system but now it’s official: the spacecraft has left the building. This makes it the first human-made object to move beyond the Sun, its planets and its heliosphere, a region of space dominated by the Sun and its wind of energetic particles. The findings are to be published in Geophysical Research Letters (see abstract). In their article the authors write:
“It appears that [Voyager 1] has exited the main solar modulation region, revealing [hydrogen] and [helium] spectra characteristic of those to be expected in the local interstellar medium.”
And so there you have it, humans are an interstellar species. This is the century in which we have sent a machine on the path to the stars. Will a spacecraft carrying humans join it next century? We can only hope. UPDATENASA says not so fast, reiterating a position it took last December when questions arose about Voyager’s exit from the solar system:
“The Voyager team is aware of reports today that NASA’s Voyager 1 has left the solar system,” said Edward Stone, Voyager project scientist based at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif. “It is the consensus of the Voyager science team that Voyager 1 has not yet left the solar system or reached interstellar space. In December 2012, the Voyager science team reported that Voyager 1 is within a new region called ‘the magnetic highway’ where energetic particles changed dramatically. A change in the direction of the magnetic field is the last critical indicator of reaching interstellar space, and that change of direction has not yet been observed.”
Well, that’s interesting.


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Training budgets: Smaller is not an option

  The debate on the budgets for the government organizations is pretty toxic in the US. Both US Navy and US Army alongside other organizations have declared budget shortfalls which effect many areas including training. Without commitment to training and learning new skills there can be no continuous improvement, which is one of the prime […]
  The debate on the budgets for the government organizations is pretty toxic in the US. Both US Navy and US Army alongside other organizations have declared budget shortfalls which effect many areas including training. Without commitment to training and learning new skills there can be no continuous improvement, which is one of the prime directives of any government or company. The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) specializes in short course technical training in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, systems engineering and signal processing. Since 1984 ATI has provided leading-edge public courses and on-site technical training to defense and NASA facilities, as well as DOD and aerospace contractors. The courses provide a clear understanding of the fundamental principles and a working knowledge of current technology and applications.   When your company does not want to pay for the training you really want, as an alternative, you can:
  • Spent your own personal money and funds; if you believe in it and then you will do it
  • Find a user group who are practicing the skills you desire
  • Don’t accept the classic answer from the boss, “How does X help the business?”. If the training is relevant to you achieving a goal of being a much better employee then of course it is relevant.
  • Find another organization to work for
A training manager with a good team can:
  • Fight for your team and their training; fight for your team’s budget and don’t let the senior management take it away
  • Give up your personal training for the entire year and suggest that they allocate the extra budget to training for your team members
  • Perhaps, it is time to evaluate the relationship with the preferred supplier of training. Has your firm been getting decent value from the PSL (preferred supplier list)?
  • Find alternatives to training like brown bag lunches and/or collaborate with other businesses
Everybody needs training and self-improvement. Please share your opinion with us by commenting below.
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Space Tourism and Informed Consent Laws

ATI specializes in Space and Launch Vehicles technical training. We thought that the evolving state of law and regulations discussed below may interest you. A full listing of ATIcourses” Space and Launch is listed at this link.  https://aticourses.com/catalog_of_all_ATI_courses.htm#space Spaceport America is lobbying New Mexico legislators to expand legislation to provide protection to suppliers and manufacturers […]
ATI specializes in Space and Launch Vehicles technical training. We thought that the evolving state of law and regulations discussed below may interest you. A full listing of ATIcourses” Space and Launch is listed at this link.  https://aticourses.com/catalog_of_all_ATI_courses.htm#space Spaceport America is lobbying New Mexico legislators to expand legislation to provide protection to suppliers and manufacturers of private spacecraft’s.  New Mexico already has legislation exempting operators from being sued by passengers, so long as the passenger has signed an informed consent. However, the current exemption does not apply to suppliers and manufacturers, could be liable if or when an accident occurs. Without such protections space tourism companies, such as Virgin Galactic, may be forced to leave New Mexico for states that provide greater liability protection.  For example, Virginia  2007 legislation addressing immunity from tort claims relating to space flight broadly defined “space entity” to include not only an operator but also “any manufacturer or supplier of components, services, or vehicles that have been reviewed by” the FAA as part of issuing such a permit or license.. Va. Code. Ann. §§ 8.01-227.8 to 8.01-227.10. However, even if New Mexico passes legislation similar Virginia’s, it is unclear if  that legislation would provided the desired protections. Discussing the proposed legislation, attorney Guigi Carminati stated: “I understand the impetus to try to match other states, but right now there is no guarantee it’s enforceable.”   There are several potential problems with immunizing legislation.  First, it is unclear whether any such state legislation would be pre-empted by federal law. Second, informed consent waivers are not always enforceable in court.  Although there is a substantial body of case law regarding when informed consent for dangerous activities is and is not enforceable, there is no case law relating to space launches. Despite the uncertainties surrounding informed consent legislation, one thing is clear. The failure to pass a liability exemption for suppliers and manufacturers could cripple New Mexico’s commercial space industry.  Former FAA official, Patti Smith, noted that “since other states have extended the liability exemption to suppliers, New Mexico must do the same to remain competitive.” Otherwise facilities such as Space Port America, New Mexico’s recently completed $200 million commercial spaceport, may be left  deserted. You can find more information in this interesting article. ATIcourses instructors are available as expert witnesses in the technical and engineering areas of Space Technology  http://www.crowell.com/files/2011-Limitations-On-Liability-As-To-Space-Tourists.pdf   Another useful source of information is http://www.huffingtonpost.com/huff-wires/20130107/us-travel-spaceport-liability-legislation/?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=green
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Closest planet to sun, Mercury, harbors ice!

It’s time to add Mercury to the list of worlds where you can go ice-skating. Confirming decades of suspicion, a NASA spacecraft has spotted vast deposits of water ice on the planet closest to the sun. A Nasa spacecraft has confirmed there’s ice at Mercury’s north pole. Scientists announced on Thursday that the orbiting probe, Messenger, has […]
NASA radar image of Mercury's north pole captured by its MESSENGER spacecraft orbiting the planet, showing in yellow radar-bright areas thought to contain deposits of water ice.
It’s time to add Mercury to the list of worlds where you can go ice-skating. Confirming decades of suspicion, a NASA spacecraft has spotted vast deposits of water ice on the planet closest to the sun. A Nasa spacecraft has confirmed there’s ice at Mercury’s north pole. Scientists announced on Thursday that the orbiting probe, Messenger, has found evidence of frozen water, even though Mercury is the closest planet to the sun. The ice is located in the permanently shadowed region of Mercury’s north pole. It’s thought to be at least 1.5 feet deep and possibly as much as 65 feet deep. Scientists say it’s likely Mercury’s south pole also has ice, though there are no data to support it. Messenger orbits much closer to the north pole than the south. Radar measurements, for years, have suggested the presence of ice. Now scientists know for a fact. Messenger is the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury. It was launched in 2004. Read more here.
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The future is here: Our children can partner with NASA on MARS studies

Who would have thought that our children can participate in NASA space and solar system studies directly? Now they can thanks to New NASA science resource called Wavelength. Wavelength site features hundreds of resources organized by topic and audience level from elementary to college, and out-of-school programs that span the extent of NASA science.  It […]
Who would have thought that our children can participate in NASA space and solar system studies directly? Now they can thanks to New NASA science resource called Wavelength. Wavelength site features hundreds of resources organized by topic and audience level from elementary to college, and out-of-school programs that span the extent of NASA science.  It not only lets users find nearly everything they want to know about NASA science, but it also allows them to provide direct feedback to NASA to enhance our products. Seven Washington Academy fifth-graders in Belvidere, IL are doing just that.  Although the young scientists aren’t quite ready for NASA yet, they’re helping gather research for it. Based on the information they gather, the students will propose a question to NASA — for example, was there ever ice on Mars? Then, the space agency will use the visible wavelength camera aboard the Mars Odyssey spacecraft in orbit around the red planet to take photos that can help the young scholars answer their original question. The students will use Skype to present their findings to NASA scientists, who will place data into a database for experts to use. Aside from researching Mars, the process allows students to think independently and learn how to collaborate to solve problems.  This real-world application motivates students to question all theories and dive into studies themselves. There are even resources that I can explore with my pre-school age daughter Alice.  You can find them here. THANKS, NASA! For access to NASA Wavelength, visit: http://nasawavelength.org For information on NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, visit: http://science.nasa.gov/ For information about NASA education programs, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/education


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California space law boosts business, not safety

Private cargo-carrying spacecraft? No problem, but put people on commercial flights and things get messy. Just as NASA set the date for SpaceX’s first official trip to the International Space Station, the firm’s home state of California passed a law lightening company responsibility for the safety of future passengers. No private space firm yet sends crewed flights […]
Private cargo-carrying spacecraft? No problem, but put people on commercial flights and things get messy. Just as NASA set the date for SpaceX’s first official trip to the International Space Station, the firm’s home state of California passed a law lightening company responsibility for the safety of future passengers. No private space firm yet sends crewed flights to space, but that is the plan. The new law treats spaceflight rather like sky-diving, requiring future travellers to give “informed consent”. They agree not to sue the company they fly with if they’re injured or killed in the process. California is the last of the states hosting major contenders in the commercial space race to pass such a law, trailing Virginia, home to Orbital Sciences, New Mexico (Virgin Galactic), and Texas (Blue Origin), which have already done so. The laws may make a state more attractive to space businesses, but without statistics on the safety of commercial flights, travellers sign away their right to sue blindly. However, space tourists may not care: Virgin Galactic, which plans to launch its first crewed flight in 2013, has a roster of passengers who have signed consent agreements. What is your opinion?
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Planet Mars is a piece of art! Who would have thought?

The otherworldly beauty of the surface of Mars has been captivating us for nearly for decades.  The images below provide insights into the history, climate and geology of our nearest planet. See more of the stunning Mar’s images here.
The otherworldly beauty of the surface of Mars has been captivating us for nearly for decades.  The images below provide insights into the history, climate and geology of our nearest planet.
Taken by Mars Exploration Rover
See more of the stunning Mar’s images here.
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NASA repositions Mars spacecraft for direct information to earth

THE National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) NASA’s Mars Odyssey spacecraft has successfully adjusted its orbital location to be in a better position to provide prompt confirmation of the August landing of the Curiosity rover. NASA is the agency of the United States government that is responsible for the nation’s civilian space programme and for […]
THE National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) NASA’s Mars Odyssey spacecraft has successfully adjusted its orbital location to be in a better position to provide prompt confirmation of the August landing of the Curiosity rover. NASA is the agency of the United States government that is responsible for the nation’s civilian space programme and for aeronautics and aerospace research. NASA in a statement made available to The Guardian from Washington yesterday said the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) spacecraft carrying Curiosity “can send limited information directly to Earth as it enters Mars’ atmosphere.” Before the landing, Earth will set below the Martian horizon from the descending spacecraft’s perspective, ending that direct route of communication. Odyssey will help to speed up the indirect communication process. Meanwhile, for several days this month, Greenland’s surface ice cover melted over a larger area than at any time in more than 30 years of satellite observations. Nearly the entire ice cover of Greenland, from its thin, low-lying coastal edges to its two-mile-thick centre, experienced some degree of melting at its surface, according to measurements from three independent satellites analyzed by NASA and university scientists. On average in the summer, about half of the surface of Greenland’s ice sheet naturally melts. At high elevations, most of that melt water quickly refreezes in place. Near the coast, some of the melt water is retained by the ice sheet and the rest is lost to the ocean. But this year the extent of ice melting at or near the surface jumped dramatically. According to satellite data, an estimated 97 percent of the ice sheet surface thawed at some point in mid-July.


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Do You Know the Key Differences between Gimballing and Strapdown Intertial Navigation Systems?

Video Clip: Click to Watch Maybe You Should Find Your Way to ATI’s Strapdown and Integrated Navigation Systems Course In this highly structured 4-day short course – specifically tailored to the needs of busy engineers, scientists, managers, and aerospace professionals – Thomas S. Logsdon will provide you with new insights into the modern guidance, navigation, and […]
Strapdown Algorithm Design for Strapdown Inertial Navigation Systems
Video Clip: Click to Watch
Maybe You Should Find Your Way to ATI’s Strapdown and Integrated Navigation Systems Course
In this highly structured 4-day short course – specifically tailored to the needs of busy engineers, scientists, managers, and aerospace professionals – Thomas S. Logsdon will provide you with new insights into the modern guidance, navigation, and control techniques now being perfected at key research centers around the globe
The various topics are illustrated with powerful analogies, full-color sketches, block diagrams, simple one-page derivations highlighting their salient features, and numerical examples that employ inputs from today’s battlefield rockets, orbiting satellites, and deep-space missions. These lessons are carefully laid out to help you design and implement practical performance-optimal missions and test procedures
Why not take a short course? ATI short courses are less than a week long and are designed to help you keep your professional knowledge up-to-date. Our courses provide a practical overview of space and defense technologies which provide a strong foundation for an understanding the issues that must be confronted in the use, regulation and development of complex systems. What You Will Learn • What are the key differences between gimballing and strapdown Intertial Navigation Systems? • How are transfer alignment operations being carried out on modern battlefields? • How sensitive are today’s solid state accelerometers and how are they currently being designed? • What is a covariance matrix and how can it be used in evaluating the performance capabilities of Integrated GPS/INS Navigation Systems? • How do the Paveway IV smart bombs differ from their predecessors? • What are their key performance capabilities in practical battlefield situations? • What is the deep space network and how does it handle its demanding missions? Course Outline, Samplers, and Notes Our short courses are designed for individuals involved in planning, designing, building, launching, and operating space and defense systems. Determine for yourself the value of this course before you sign up. Click here for the sample Course video on YouTube You will receive a full set of detailed notes at the beginning of the class for future reference and you can add notes and more detail based on the in-class interaction. After attending the course you will also receive a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information. About the Applied Techinolgy Institute (ATI) Since 1984, the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has provided leading-edge public courses and onsite technical training to DoD and NASA personnel, as well as contractors. Whether you are a busy engineer, a technical expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of complex systems in a short time. You will become aware of the basic vocabulary essential to interact meaningfully with your colleagues. If you or your team is in need of more technical training, then boost your career with the knowledge needed to provide better, faster, and cheaper solutions for sophisticated DoD and NASA systems. Our mission here at ATI is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses. About the Instructors ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology. Thomas S. Logsdon has accumulated more than 30 years experience with the Naval Ordinance Laboratory, McDonnell Douglas, Lockheed Martin, Boeing Aerospace, and Rockwell International. His research projects and consulting assignments have included the Tartar and Talos shipboard missiles, Project Skylab, and various deep space interplanetary probes and missions. Mr. Logsdon has also worked extensively on the Navstar GPS, including military applications, constellation design and coverage studies. He has taught and lectured in 31 different countries on six continents and he has written and published 1.7 million words, including 29 technical books. His textbooks include Striking It Rich in Space, Understanding the Navstar, Mobile Communication Satellites, and Orbital Mechanics: Theory and Applications. Dr. Walter R. Dyer is a graduate of UCLA, with a Ph.D. degree in Control Systems Engineering and Applied Mathematics. He has over thirty years of industry, government and academic experience in the analysis and design of tactical and strategic missiles. His experience includes Standard Missile, Stinger, AMRAAM, HARM, MX, Small ICBM, and ballistic missile defense. He is currently a Senior Staff Member at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory and was formerly the Chief Technologist at the Missile Defense Agency in Washington, DC. He has authored numerous industry and government reports and published prominent papers on missile technology. He has also taught university courses in engineering at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. Dates and Locations For the dates and locations of all of these short courses, please see below: Sep 24-27, 2012 Columbia, MD Jan 21-24, 2013 Cape Canaveral, FL
Sincerely, The ATI Courses Team P.S Call today for registration at 410-956-8805 or 888-501-2100 or access our website at www.ATIcourses.com. For general questions please email us at ATI@ATIcourses.com
 


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Under President Obama, the PUBLIC Sector is Doing Fine

Typical Agile Project Management Process Video Clip: Click to Watch Do You Know How to Satisfy the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Requirements (Circular A-11) while Applying an Agile Execution Approach? If you answered NO, Then you should take our Agile Projects in the Government Environment Course In this powerful two-day course, you’ll grasp the […]
Typical Agile Project Management Process
Typical Agile Project Management Process
Video Clip: Click to Watch
Do You Know How to Satisfy the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Requirements (Circular A-11) while Applying an Agile Execution Approach? If you answered NO, Then you should take our Agile Projects in the Government Environment Course
In this powerful two-day course, you’ll grasp the concepts, principles, and structure of Agile development and how these are being applied in the unique federal environment. A common misconception is that Agility means lack of order or discipline, but that’s incorrect. It requires strong discipline. You must have a solid foundation of practices and procedures in order to successfully adapt Agile in the Government environment, and you must also learn to follow those practices correctly while tying them to pre-defined, rigid quality goals. This workshop gives you the foundation of knowledge and experience you need in order to be successful on your next federal project. Define principles and highlight advantages and disadvantages of Agile development and how to map them to federal guidelines for IT procurement, development and delivery. Get firsthand experience organizing and participating in an Agile team. Put the concepts you learn to practice instantly in the classroom project. Understand and learn how to take advantage of the opportunities for Agile, while applying them within current government project process requirements. Specifically, you will • Consistently deliver better products that will enable your customer’s success • Reduce the risk of project failure, missed deadlines, scope overrun or exceeded budgets • Establish, develop, empower, nurture and protect high-performing teams • Identify and eliminate waste from processes • Map government project language to Agile language simply and effectively • Foster collaboration, even with teams that are distributed geographically and organizationally • Clearly understand how EVM and Agile can be integrated • Understand the structure of Agile processes that breed success in the federal environment • Embrace ever-changing requirements Who Should Attend Because this is an immersion course and the intent is to engage in the practices every Agile team will employ, this course is recommended for all team members responsible for delivering outstanding software. That includes, but is not limited to, the following roles: • Business Analyst • Technical Analyst • Project Manager • Software Engineer/Programmer • Development Manager • Product Manager • Product Analyst • Tester • QA Engineer • Documentation Specialist The Agile Boot Camp is a perfect place for cross functional “teams” to become familiar with Agile methods and learn the basics together. It’s also a wonderful springboard for team building & learning. Bring your project detail to work on in class. About the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) Since 1984, the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has provided leading-edge public courses and onsite technical training to DoD and NASA personnel, as well as contractors. Whether you are a busy engineer, a technical expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of complex systems in a short time. You will become aware of the basic vocabulary essential to interact meaningfully with your colleagues. If you or your team is in need of more technical training, then boost your career with the knowledge needed to provide better, faster, and cheaper solutions for sophisticated DoD and NASA systems. What You Will Learn • Consistently deliver better products that will enable your customer’s success • Reduce the risk of project failure, missed deadlines, scope overrun or exceeded budgets • Establish, develop, empower, nurture and protect high-performing teams • Identify and eliminate waste from processes • Map government project language to Agile language simply and effectively • Foster collaboration, even with teams that are distributed geographically and organizationally • Clearly understand how EVM and Agile can be integrated • Understand the structure of Agile processes that breed success in the federal environment • Embrace ever-changing requirements for your customer’s competitive advantage Why not take a short course? ATI short courses are less than a week long and are designed to help you keep your professional knowledge up-to-date. Our courses provide a practical overview of space and defense technologies which provide a strong foundation for an understanding the issues that must be confronted in the use, regulation and development of complex systems. Dates and Locations For the dates and locations of these short courses, please see below: Jul 19-20, 2012 Baltimore, MD Aug 9-10, 2012 Washington, DC Sep 13-14, 2012 Herndon, VA Oct 18-19, 2012 Columbia, MD Sincerely, The ATI Courses Team P.S Call today for registration at 410-956-8805 or 888-501-2100 or access our website at www.ATIcourses.com. For general questions please email us at ATI@ATIcourses.com


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Get Grounded with an Introduction to Ground System Elements and Technologies from ATI

Video Clip: Click to Watch ATI’S GROUND SYSTEMS DESIGN & OPERATION COURSE This course provides a practical introduction to all aspects of ground system design and operation. Starting with basic communications principles, an understanding is developed of ground system architectures and system design issues. The function of major ground system elements is explained, leading to a […]
Video Clip: Click to Watch
This course provides a practical introduction to all aspects of ground system design and operation. Starting with basic communications principles, an understanding is developed of ground system architectures and system design issues. The function of major ground system elements is explained, leading to a discussion of day-to-day operations. The course concludes with a discussion of current trends in Ground System design and operations. This course is intended for engineers, technical managers, and scientists who are interested in acquiring a working understanding of ground systems as an introduction to the field or to help broaden their overall understanding of space mission systems and mission operations. It is also ideal for technical professionals who need to use, manage, operate, or purchase a ground system. Since 1984, the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has provided leading-edge public courses and onsite technical training to DoD and NASA personnel, as well as contractors. Whether you are a busy engineer, a technical expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of complex systems in a short time. You will become aware of the basic vocabulary essential to interact meaningfully with your colleagues. If you or your team is in need of more technical training, then boost your career with the knowledge needed to provide better, faster, and cheaper solutions for sophisticated DoD and NASA systems. Why not take a short course? ATI short courses are less than a week long and are designed to help you keep your professional knowledge up-to-date. Our courses provide a practical overview of space and defense technologies which provide a strong foundation for an understanding the issues that must be confronted in the use, regulation and development of complex systems. What You Will Learn • The fundamentals of ground system design, architecture and technology • Cost and performance tradeoffs in the spacecraft-to-ground communications link • Cost and performance tradeoffs in the design and implementation of a ground system • The capabilities and limitations of the various modulation types (FM, PSK, QPSK) • The fundamentals of ranging and orbit determination for orbit maintenance • Basic day-to-day operations practices and procedures for typical ground systems • Current trends and recent experiences in cost and schedule constrained operations Course Outline, Sampler, and Notes Our short courses are designed for individuals involved in planning, designing, building, launching, and operating space and defense systems. Determine for yourself the value of this course before you sign up. See Slide Samples You will receive a full set of detailed notes at the beginning of the class for future reference and you can add notes and more detail based on the in-class interaction. After attending the course you will also receive a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information. About ATI and the Instructors Our mission here at ATI is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses. ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology. Steve Gemeny is Principal Program Engineer. Formerly Senior Member of the Professional Staff at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory where he served as Ground Station Lead for the TIMED mission to explore Earth’s atmosphere and Lead Ground System Engineer on the New Horizons mission to explore Pluto by 2020. Prior to joining the Applied Physics Laboratory, Mr. Gemeny held numerous engineering and technical sales positions with Orbital Sciences Corporation, Mobile TeleSystems Inc. and COMSAT Corporation beginning in 1980. Mr. Gemeny is an experienced professional in the field of Ground Station and Ground System design in both the commercial world and on NASA Science missions with a wealth of practical knowledge spanning nearly three decades. Mr. Gemeny delivers his experiences and knowledge to his students with an informative and entertaining presentation style. Date and Location For the date and location of this short course, please see below: Sep 10-12, 2012 Albuquerque, NM


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ATI’s Fiber Optic Communication Systems Engineering Course

Can You Perform Cost Analysis or Design Fiber Optic Systems? This three-day course investigates the basic aspects of digital and analog fiber-optic communication systems. Topics include sources and receivers, optical fibers and their propagation characteristics, and optical fiber systems. The principles of operation and properties of optoelectronic components, as well as signal guiding characteristics of […]
Can You Perform Cost Analysis or Design Fiber Optic Systems?
This three-day course investigates the basic aspects of digital and analog fiber-optic communication systems. Topics include sources and receivers, optical fibers and their propagation characteristics, and optical fiber systems. The principles of operation and properties of optoelectronic components, as well as signal guiding characteristics of glass fibers are discussed. System design issues include both analog and digital point-to-point optical links and fiber-optic networks. From this course you will obtain the knowledge needed to perform basic fiber-optic communication systems engineering calculations, identify system tradeoffs, and apply this knowledge to modern fiber optic systems. This will enable you to evaluate real systems, communicate effectively with colleagues, and understand the most recent literature in the field of fiber-optic communications. Since 1984, the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has provided leading-edge public courses and onsite technical training. Whether you are a busy engineer, a technical expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of complex systems in a short time. You will become aware of the basic vocabulary essential to interact meaningfully with your colleagues. If you or your team is in need of more technical training, then boost your career with the knowledge needed to provide better, faster, and cheaper solutions for these sophisticated systems. Why not take a short course????????????????? ATI short courses are less than a week long and are designed to help you keep your professional knowledge up-to-date. Our courses provide a practical overview of space and defense technologies which provide a strong foundation for an understanding the issues that must be confronted in the use, regulation and development of complex systems. What You Will Learn: • What are the basic elements in analog and digital fiber optic communication systems including fiber-optic components and basic coding schemes? • How fiber properties such as loss, dispersion and non-linearity impact system performance. • How systems are compensated for loss, dispersion and non-linearity. • How a fiber-optic amplifier works and it’s impact on system performance. • How to maximize fiber bandwidth through wavelength division multiplexing. • How is the fiber-optic link budget calculated? • What are typical characteristics of real fiber-optic systems including CATV, gigabit Ethernet, POF data links, RF-antenna remoting systems, long-haul telecommunication links.

ATI Fundamentals of Passive and Active Sonar Short Course

Video Clip: Click to Watch Do You know All There Is to Know About All the Major System Components in a SONAR System? This four-day course is designed for (SOund Navigation And Ranging) SONAR systems engineers, combat systems engineers, undersea warfare professionals, and managers who wish to enhance their understanding of passive and active SONAR or […]
Video Clip: Click to Watch
Do You know All There Is to Know About All the Major System Components in a SONAR System?
This four-day course is designed for (SOund Navigation And Ranging) SONAR systems engineers, combat systems engineers, undersea warfare professionals, and managers who wish to enhance their understanding of passive and active SONAR or become familiar with the “big picture” if they work outside of either discipline. Each topic is presented by instructors with substantial experience at sea. Presentations are illustrated by worked numerical examples using simulated or experimental data describing actual undersea acoustic situations and geometries. Visualization of transmitted waveforms, target interactions, and detector responses is emphasized
Since 1984, the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has provided leading-edge public courses and onsite technical training. Whether you are a busy engineer, a technical expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of complex systems in a short time. You will become aware of the basic vocabulary essential to interact meaningfully with your colleagues. If you or your team is in need of more technical training, then boost your career with the knowledge needed to provide better, faster, and cheaper solutions for sophisticated systems
What You Will Learn: • The differences between various types of SONAR used on naval platforms today • The fundamental principles governing these systems’ operation • How these systems’ data are used to conduct passive and active operations • How to avoid previous mistakes revealed when systems were taken to sea • Signal acquisition and target motion analysis for passive systems • Waveform and receiver design for active systems • The major cost drivers for undersea acoustic systems Course Outline, Samplers, and Notes Our short courses are designed for individuals involved in planning, designing, building, launching, and operating space and defense systems. Determine for yourself the value of our courses before you sign up. See our samples (See Slide Samples) on some of our courses. Or check out the new ATI channel on YouTube. You will receive a full set of detailed notes at the beginning of the class for future reference and you can add notes and more detail based on the in-class interaction. After completing the course you will also receive a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information. About ATI and the Instructors Our mission here at ATI is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses. ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology. Dr. Harold “Bud” Vincent, Research Associate Professor of Ocean Engineering at the University of Rhode Island and President of DBV Technology, LLC is a U.S. Naval officer qualified in submarine warfare and salvage diving. He has over twenty years of undersea systems experience working in industry, academia, and government (military and civilian). He served on active duty on fast attack and ballistic missile submarines, worked at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center, and conducted advanced R&D in the defense industry. Dr. Vincent received the M.S. and Ph.D in Ocean Engineering (Underwater Acoustics) from the University of Rhode Island. His teaching and research encompasses underwater acoustic systems, communications, signal processing, ocean instrumentation, and navigation. He has been awarded four patents for undersea systems and algorithms. Dr. Duncan Sheldon has over twenty-five years’ experience in the field of active sonar signal processing. At Navy undersea warfare laboratories (New London, CT, and Newport, RI) he directed a multiyear research program and developed new active sonar waveforms and receivers for ASW and mine warfare. This work included collaboration with U.S. and international sea tests. His experience includes real-time direction at sea of surface sonar assets during ‘free-play’ NATO ASW exercises. He was a Principal Scientist at the NATO Undersea Research Centre at La Spezia, Italy. He received his Ph.D. from MIT in 1969 and has published articles on waveform and receiver design in the U.S. Navy Journal of Underwater Acoustics. Date and Location For the date and location of this short course, please see below: Aug 13-16, 2012 Newport, RI Sincerely, The ATI Courses Team P.S Call today for registration at 410-956-8805 or 888-501-2100 or access our website at www.ATIcourses.com. For general questions please email us at ATI@ATIcourses.com or Join, Link, Follow or Share with us at: Join us on Facebook Link to us on LinkedIn Follow us on Twitter Share with us on Slideshare P.P.S. What Happens at ATI does NOT Stay at ATI because our training helps you and your organization remain competitive in this changing world. Please feel free to call Mr. Jenkins personally to discuss your requirements and objectives. He will be glad to explain in detail what ATI can do for you, what it will cost, and what you can expect in results and future performance.

Agile Boot Camp: Practitioner’s Real-World Solutions

Video Clip: Click to Watch Practitioner’s Workshop to Pragmatic Real-World Adoption Iteration Planning, Product Roadmap and Backlog, Estimating Practices, User Story Development and Iteration Execution Presented by the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) While not a silver bullet, Agile Methodologies are quickly becoming the most practical way to create outstanding software. Scrum, Extreme Programming, Lean, Dynamic Systems […]
Agile is a wonderful springboard for team building & learning
Video Clip: Click to Watch
Presented by the Applied Technology Institute (ATI)
While not a silver bullet, Agile Methodologies are quickly becoming the most practical way to create outstanding software. Scrum, Extreme Programming, Lean, Dynamic Systems Development Method, Feature Driven Development and other methods each have their strengths. While there are significant similarities that have brought them together under the Agile umbrella, each method brings unique strengths that can be utilized for your team success. Rarely do organizations adopt one methodology in its pure form. Rather success is achieved by combining the best practices, creating a hybrid approach. The only way to Agile success is practice. Agile is an art more than a science. The art of Agile must be practiced and finely tuned over multiple iterations. In this three-day Agile Boot Camp you will put the knowledge, skills, tools and techniques taught to work. The classroom will be broken up into Agile teams and your expert instructor will drive each team through the Agile process from Vision down to Daily planning and execution. Your instructor will answer questions with real world experience, as all of our instructors have Agile experience “in the trenches.” This three-day class is set up in pods/teams. Each team looks like a real-world development unit in Agile with Project Manager/Scrum Master, Business Analyst, Tester and Development. The teams will work through the Agile process including Iteration planning, Product road mapping and backlogging, estimating, user story development iteration execution, and retrospectives by working off of real work scenarios. Specifically, you will: • Practice how to be and develop a self-organized team • Create and communicate a Product Vision • Understand your customer and develop customer roles and personas • Initiate the requirements process by developing user stories and your product backlog • Put together product themes from your user stories and establish a desired product roadmap • Conduct story point estimating to determine effort needed for user stories to ultimately determine iteration(s) length • Take into consideration assumed team velocity with story point estimates and user story priorities to come up with you release plan • Engage the planning and execution of your iteration(s) • Conduct retrospectives after each iteration • Run a course retrospective to enable an individual plan of execution on how to conduct Agile in your environment Who Should Attend? Because this is an immersion course and the intent is to engage in the practices every Agile team will employ, this course is recommended for all team members responsible for delivering outstanding software. That includes, but is not limited to, the following roles:
Business Analyst, Technical Analyst, Project Manager Software Engineer/Programmer, Development Manager, Product Manager Product Analyst, Tester, QA Engineer, Documentation Specialist
What You Will Learn • Practice and maintain a regular cadence when delivering working software each iteration • Follow the team approach; start as a team, finish as a team • Gain knowledge and understanding of Agile principles with context on why they are so important for each team • Embrace planning from Vision down to Daily level, recognizing the value of continuous planning over following a plan • Build a backlog of prioritized stories that provides emergent requirements for analysis that also fosters customer engagement and understanding • Engage in more effective estimating (story points) and become more accurate by being less precise • Pull together Agile release plans that connect you back to business expectations – including hard date commitments and fixed price models • Apply Agile testing strategies based on unit and acceptance testing, which creates a bottom up confirmation that your software works • Avoid the top mistakes made when rolling out Agile practices and how to craft an adoption strategy that will work in your organizational culture Dates and Locations For the dates and locations of these short courses, please see below: 5/2-4/2012, San Diego, CA 5/9-11/2012, Philadelphia, PA 5/14-16/2023, Phoenix, AZ 5/16-18/2012, Washington, DC 5/23-25/2012, Houston, TX 6/6-8/2012, Cleveland, OH 6/13-15/2012, Chicago, IL 6/18-20/2012, Columbia, MD 6/25-27/2012, Baltimore, MD 6/27-29/2012, Kansas City, MO 7/23-25/2012, Boston, MA 7/30-1/2012, Reston, VA 8/8-10/2012, San Diego, CA 8/27-29/2012, St Louis, MO The Agile Boot Camp is a perfect place for cross functional “teams” to become familiar with Agile methods and learn the basics together. It’s also a wonderful springboard for team building & learning. Bring your project detail to work on in class.

Computational Electromagnetics (CEM): New Course from ATI

Video Clip: Click to Watch With this course you will become more of an electromagnetic expert This three-day course teaches the basics of Computational Electromagnetics (CEM) with application examples. Fundamental concepts in the solution of EM radiation and scattering problems are presented. Emphasis is on applying computational methods to practical applications. Students will be able to […]
Maxwell’s Equations in Vector Form
Video Clip: Click to Watch
With this course you will become more of an electromagnetic expert
This three-day course teaches the basics of Computational Electromagnetics (CEM) with application examples. Fundamental concepts in the solution of EM radiation and scattering problems are presented. Emphasis is on applying computational methods to practical applications. Students will be able to identify the most relevant CEM method for various applications, avoid common user pitfalls, understand model validation and correctly interpret results. Students are encouraged to bring their laptop to work examples using the provided FEKO Lite code. You will also learn the importance of model development and meshing, post- processing for scientific visualization and presentation of results. COMPUTATIONAL ELECTROMAGNETICS What You Will Learn: • A review of electromagnetics and antennas with modern applications. • An overview of popular CEM methods with commercial codes as examples • Hands-on experience with FEKO Lite to demonstrate modeling guidelines and common pitfalls. • An understanding of the latest developments in CEM methods and High Performance Computing. Course Outline, Samplers, and Notes Determine for yourself the value of this course before you sign up. See Slide Samples. Participants will receive a complete set of notes, a copy of FEKO and textbook for future reference. You can add notes and more detail based on the in-class interaction. After completion, all students receive a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information. About ATI and the Instructors Our mission here at ATI is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses. ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology. Dr. Keefe Coburn is a senior design engineer with the U.S. Army Research Laboratory in Adelphi MD. He has a Bachelor’s degree in Physics from the VA Polytechnic Institute with Masters and Doctoral Degrees from the George Washington University. In his job at the Army Research Lab, he applies CEM tools for antenna design, system integration and system performance analysis. He teaches graduate courses at the Catholic University of America in antenna and remote sensing. He is a member of the IEEE, the Applied Computational Electromagnetics Society, the Union of Radio Scientists and Sigma Xi. He serves on the Configuration Control Board for the Army developed GEMACS code and the ACES Board of Directors. Dates and Locations For the dates and locations of this short course, please see below: May 16-18, 2012 in Columbia, MD Sincerely, The ATI Courses Team P.S Call today for registration at 410-956-8805 or 888-501-2100 or access our website at www.ATIcourses.com. For general questions please email us at ATI@ATIcourses.com or Join, Link, Follow or Share with us at: Join us on Facebook Link to us on LinkedIn Follow us on Twitter Share with us on Slideshare P.P.S. What Happens at ATI does NOT Stay at ATI because our training helps you and your organization remain competitive in this changing world. Please feel free to call Mr. Jenkins personally to discuss your requirements and objectives. He will be glad to explain in detail what ATI can do for you, what it will cost, and what you can expect in results and future performance.